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Seneca Lake State Park

Seneca Lake State Park is a 141-acre (0.57 km2) state park located in Seneca County, New York in the United States.[5] The park is at the north end of Seneca Lake, one of the Finger Lakes. The park is south of and between Geneva and Waterloo.

Seneca Lake State Park
Seneca Pk.jpg
Seneca Lake State Park marina
Seneca Lake State Park is located in New York
Seneca Lake State Park
Location of Seneca Lake State Park within New York State
Type State park
Location 1 Lakefront Drive
Geneva, New York[1]
Nearest city Geneva, New York
Coordinates 42°52′23″N 76°56′46″W / 42.873°N 76.946°W / 42.873; -76.946Coordinates: 42°52′23″N 76°56′46″W / 42.873°N 76.946°W / 42.873; -76.946
Area 141 acres (0.57 km2)[2]
Created 1957 (1957)[3]
Operated by New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
Visitors 144,200 (in 2014)[4]
Open All year
Website Seneca Lake State Park

Contents

DescriptionEdit

Seneca Lake State Park offers a beach, picnic tables, biking, boat launches, fishing and ice fishing. A "Sprayground" water park, as well as an adjacent traditional playground, are available for children ages 4 to 12. Two marinas with a total of 216 slips are also available at the park.[1]

HistoryEdit

The park began as a municipal park developed by the city of Geneva in 1922. The park was opened as Seneca Lake State Park in 1957 after the city transferred the land to the state of New York. The park's "Sprayground" was opened in 2002.[3]

2005 cryptosporidiosis outbreakEdit

On August 1, 2005, the park closed its "Sprayground" water park after the parasite Cryptosporidium was discovered in the tanks supplying the attraction. By September 1 of that year, over 3,800 people had reported symptoms of cryptosporidiosis, a gastrointestinal illness caused by the parasite.[6] After laboratory analysis, 425 cases were confirmed and a total of 1,374 probable cases were considered to have originated from the park.[7] The incident led to the passage of increased regulations regarding sanitation procedures at water parks in New York State.[8]

The Sprayground reopened on August 26, 2006, following an upgrade of its filtration and disinfection facilities which included the incorporation of an ultraviolet unit donated by ITT/Wedeco.[9] A $5 million class-action lawsuit brought against New York State was settled in 2014, with damages being awarded to as many as 2,500 victims of the outbreak.[10][11]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Seneca Lake State Park". NYS Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  2. ^ Hutton, Frank Zinn (1972). Soil Survey of Seneca County, New York. U.S. Soil Conservation Service. p. 1. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "State Parks Opens New Recreational Facilities In Finger Lakes". NYS Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation. July 30, 2002. Archived from the original on May 24, 2006. Retrieved October 29, 2016. 
  4. ^ "State Park Annual Attendance Figures by Facility: Beginning 2003". Data.ny.gov. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Seneca Lake State Park". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  6. ^ "State Health Department Issues Precautions Schools Should Take to Prevent Spread of Gastrointestinal Illness". New York State Health Department. September 1, 2005. Retrieved December 1, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Water Play Areas & Interactive Fountains - Outbreaks Associated with Water Play Areas / Interactive Fountains". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. May 8, 2013. Retrieved December 2, 2015. 
  8. ^ "State Health Department Issues Precautions to Protect the Public Health at Water Spray Park Attractions". New York State Health Department. May 26, 2006. Retrieved December 2, 2015. 
  9. ^ Ithaca Journal, 2006-08-26[dead link]
  10. ^ "State settles with victims of outbreak". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. September 30, 2014. Retrieved December 2, 2015. 
  11. ^ Shaw, David L. (September 24, 2014). "Settlement of spray park lawsuit in the works". Finger Lakes Times. Retrieved December 2, 2015. 

External linksEdit