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Secretary of State for War and the Colonies

The Secretary of State for War and the Colonies was a British cabinet-level position responsible for the army and the British colonies (other than India). The Department was created in 1801. In 1854 it was split into the separate offices of Secretary of State for War and Secretary of State for the Colonies. The Secretary was supported by an Under-Secretary of State for War and the Colonies.

Secretary of State for War and the Colonies
Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom (HM Government).svg
StyleThe Right Honourable [Note 1]
Member ofCabinet · Privy Council · Parliament
AppointerMonarch of the United Kingdom
based on advice of the Prime Minister
Term lengthAt Her Majesty's pleasure
Formation17 March 1801
First holderThe Lord Hobart
Final holderThe Duke of Newcastle
Abolished10 June 1854
SuccessionSecretary of State for War · Secretary of State for the Colonies
DeputyUnder-Secretary of State for War and the Colonies

List of Secretaries of State for War and the Colonies (1801–1854)Edit

Secretary of State for War and the Colonies
Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Party Ministry Monarch
(Reign)
  Robert Hobart
Baron Hobart

(1760–1816)
17 March
1801
12 May
1804
Tory Addington George III
 
(1760–1820)
[Note 2]
  John Pratt
2nd Earl Camden

(1759–1840)
14 May
1804
10 July
1805
Tory Pitt II
  Robert Stewart
Viscount Castlereagh

MP for Boroughbridge
(1769–1822)
10 July
1805
5 February
1806
Tory
  William Windham
MP for New Romney
(1750–1810)
5 February
1806
25 March
1807
Whig All the Talents
(WhigTory)
  Robert Stewart
Viscount Castlereagh

MP for Plympton Erle
(1769–1822)
25 March
1807
1 November
1809
Tory Portland II
  Robert Jenkinson
2nd Earl of Liverpool

(1770–1828)
1 November
1809
11 June
1812
Tory Perceval
  Henry Bathurst
3rd Earl Bathurst

(1762–1832)
11 June
1812
30 April
1827
Tory Liverpool
George IV
 
(1820–1830)
  F. J. Robinson
1st Viscount Goderich

(1782–1859)
30 April
1827
3 September
1827
Tory Canning
(CanningiteWhig)
  William Huskisson
MP for Liverpool
(1770–1830)
3 September
1827
30 May
1828
Tory Goderich
(CanningiteWhig)
  Sir George Murray
MP for Perthshire
(1772–1846)
30 May
1828
22 November
1830
Tory Wellington–Peel
William IV
 
(1830–1837)
  F. J. Robinson
1st Viscount Goderich

(1782–1859)
22 November
1830
3 April
1833
Whig Grey
  Edward Smith-Stanley
MP for North Lancashire
(1799–1869)
3 April
1833
5 June
1834
Whig
  Thomas Spring Rice
MP for Cambridge
(1790–1866)
5 June
1834
14 November
1834
Whig Melbourne I
  Arthur Wellesley
1st Duke of Wellington

(1769–1852)
17 November
1834
9 December
1834
Tory Wellington Caretaker
  George Hamilton-Gordon
4th Earl of Aberdeen

(1784–1860)
20 December
1834
8 April
1835
Conservative Peel I
  Charles Grant
1st Baron Glenelg

(1778–1866)
18 April
1835
20 February
1839
Whig Melbourne II
Victoria
 
(1837–1901)
  Constantine Phipps
1st Marquess of Normanby

(1797–1863)
20 February
1839
30 August
1839
Whig
  Lord John Russell
MP for Stroud
(1792–1878)
30 August
1839
30 August
1841
Whig
  Edward Smith-Stanley
Baron Stanley of Bickerstaffe

(1799–1869) [Note 3]
3 September
1841
23 December
1845
Conservative Peel II
  William Ewart Gladstone
(1809–1898) [Note 4]
23 December
1845
27 June
1846
Conservative
  Henry Grey
3rd Earl Grey

(1802–1894)
6 July
1846
21 February
1852
Whig Russell I
  Sir John Pakington
Bt
MP for Droitwich
(1799–1880)
27 February
1852
17 December
1852
Conservative Who? Who?
  Henry Pelham-Clinton
5th Duke of Newcastle

(1811–1864)
28 December
1852
10 June
1854
Peelite Aberdeen
(PeeliteWhig)
Notes
  1. ^ Typical style for members of the Privy Council and peers ranked below Marquess. For peers of the rank Marquess The Most Honourable; for peers of the rank Duke His Grace.
  2. ^ The Prince of Wales served as Prince Regent from 5 February 1811.
  3. ^ MP for North Lancashire until 1844; thereafter summoned to Parliament through a writ in acceleration in respect of his father's title, Baron Stanley of Bickerstaffe.
  4. ^ On appointment to office a ministerial by-election was triggered in the Newark-upon-Trent constituency that Gladstone had represented since 1832. Gladstone did not contest the seat, and was not returned to Parliament until the 1847 general election.