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The Scotties Tournament of Hearts (French: Le Tournoi des Cœurs Scotties; commonly referred to as the Scotties) is the annual Canadian women's curling championship, sanctioned by Curling Canada, formerly called the Canadian Curling Association. The winner goes on to represent Canada at the women's world curling championships. Since 1985, the winner also gets to return to the following year's tournament as "Team Canada". It is formally known as the "Canadian Women's Curling Championship".

Scotties Tournament of Hearts
Le Tournoi des Cœurs Scotties
Stohlogo.PNG
Established1961
2020 host cityMoose Jaw, Saskatchewan
2020 arenaMosaic Place
2019 champion Alberta (Chelsea Carey)
Current edition
2019 Scotties Tournament of Hearts

Since 1982, the tournament has been sponsored by Kruger Products, which was formerly known as Scott Paper Limited when it was a Canadian subsidiary of Scott Paper Company. As such, the tournament was formerly known as the Scott Tournament of Hearts; when Kimberly-Clark merged with Scott, the Canadian arm was sold to the Quebec-based Kruger Inc. – while Kruger was granted a license to use several Scott brands in Canada until June 2007, it was given a long-term license to the Scotties brand because Kimberly-Clark already owned Kleenex. As such, the tournament was officially renamed the Scotties Tournament of Hearts in 2007.

Until 2018, the format was a round robin of 12 teams. Starting with the 2015 Scotties Tournament of Hearts there have been more than twelve eligible teams; therefore a pre-qualification tournament was held to trim the field to twelve. In 2018, a new 16-team format was introduced, in which all 14 member associations of Curling Canada field a team in the main draw, alongside the defending champions, and the winner of a play-in game between the two highest-ranked teams on the Canadian Team Ranking System standings that did not win their provincial championship.

At the end of the round-robin, playoffs occur to determine the championship winner. The system used is known as the Page playoff system.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Pre-historyEdit

1913 marked a significant point in women's curling when both the Manitoba Bonspiel and the Ontario Curling Association began holding women's curling events. Other provinces would later add provincial women's championships, but it wasn't until the 1950s that a higher level of women's curling began to occur. At this time there was a Western Canada Women's Championship (sponsored by the T. Eaton Company) but no tournament existed for the eastern provinces. By 1959, Eaton's pulled their sponsorship, giving the organizers of the Western championships an initiative to have a national championship.

In 1960, the Canadian Ladies' Curling Association was created with Dominion Stores Ltd. seeking to sponsor a national championship. That year, an eastern championship occurred so that the winner could play the winner of the western championship. In this event, Ruth Smith and her team from Lacolle, Quebec faced off against Joyce McKee's team from Saskatchewan (consisting of Sylvia Fedoruk, Donna Belding and Muriel Coben) with McKee winning. The game between the two teams was played in Oshawa, Ontario.

The following year a tournament was organized with the same format as the Brier and was held in Ottawa. McKee won again, with a new front end of Barbara MacNevin and Rosa McFee.

Early historyEdit

In 1967, Dominion Stores were unable to reach a compromise with the organizers of the tournament, and their sponsorship fell. The Canadian Ladies' Curling Association ran the tournament by themselves with no main sponsor.

Sylvia Fedoruk, after assuming the presidency of the Canadian Ladies' Curling Association found a title sponsor in the Macdonald Tobacco Company, the same sponsor as the Brier. Their sponsorship began in 1972 with the tournament being called the "Macdonald Lassie" championship, after the company's trademark.

In 1979, under increasing pressure from the anti-tobacco policies of the Canadian Government, the Macdonald Tobacco Company pulled their sponsorship from both the Brier and the Women's championship. The Canadian Ladies' Curling Association ran the tournament without a main sponsor again for the next couple of years. 1979 also marked the first year of the Women's World Curling Championship, where the national champion would play. Also, the 1979 event was the first tournament to feature a playoff. Before then, the championship team was the one with the best round robin record.

Tournament of HeartsEdit

Robin Wilson, a member of the 1979 championship team, and a former employee of Scott Paper led an effort to get the company to sponsor the championships. It was successful, and in 1982 the first Scott Tournament of Hearts was held.

The Scott Tournament of Hearts would last 25 years, and saw the likes of many great teams. The first Tournament of Hearts was won by Colleen Jones and her Nova Scotia team. It would take her 17 years to win another, but she would cap it off with another four championships for a grand total of six championships. In 2018, Colleen Jones' feat of six championships was equaled by Manitoba's Jennifer Jones. Other great curlers at the Hearts have been Chris More and Connie Laliberte of Manitoba, Heather Houston, Marilyn Bodogh and Rachel Homan of Ontario, Vera Pezer and Sandra Schmirler of Saskatchewan, Cathy Borst, Shannon Kleibrink and Chelsea Carey of Alberta and Lindsay Sparkes and Kelly Scott of British Columbia.

The new sponsorship made the tournament popular when it began to be televised. Today, TSN covers the entire tournament. CBC had covered the semi-finals and the finals up until the 2007–08 season. In 2013, Sportsnet and City began to offer coverage of the finals of the provincial playdowns in Manitoba, Ontario, and Alberta as well.

As a Tournament of Hearts tradition, the members of the winning team receive gold rings in the four-heart design of the Tournament of Hearts logo, set with a .25-carat diamond. The runners-up receive the same rings, with rubies instead of diamonds, and the third-place team receives gold rings set with emeralds.[1]

Past championsEdit

Diamond D ChampionshipEdit

Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Host
1961  Saskatchewan Joyce McKee, Sylvia Fedoruk, Barbara MacNevin, Rosa McFee Ottawa, Ontario
1962   British Columbia Ina Hansen, Ada Callas, Isabel Leith, May Shaw Regina, Saskatchewan
1963   New Brunswick Mabel DeWare, Harriet Stratton, Forbis Stevenson, Marjorie Fraser Saint John, New Brunswick
1964   British Columbia Ina Hansen, Ada Callas, Isabel Leith, May Shaw Edmonton, Alberta
1965   Manitoba Peggy Casselman, Val Taylor, Pat MacDonald, Pat Scott Halifax, Nova Scotia
1966  Alberta Gail Lee, Hazel Jamison, Sharon Harrington, June Coyle Vancouver, British Columbia
1967   Manitoba Betty Duguid, Joan Ingram, Larie Bradawaski, Dot Rose Montreal, Quebec

Canadian Ladies Curling Association ChampionshipEdit

Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Host
1968  Alberta Hazel Jamison, Gail Lee, Jackie Spencer, June Coyle Winnipeg, Manitoba
1969   Saskatchewan Joyce McKee, Vera Pezer, Lenore Morrison, Jennifer Falk Fort William, Ontario
1970   Saskatchewan Dorenda Schoenhals, Cheryl Stirton, Linda Burnham, Joan Anderson Calgary, Alberta
1971   Saskatchewan Vera Pezer, Sheila Rowan, Joyce McKee, Lenore Morrison St. John's, Newfoundland

Macdonald Lassies ChampionshipEdit

Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Host
1972   Saskatchewan Vera Pezer, Sheila Rowan, Joyce McKee, Lenore Morrison Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1973   Saskatchewan Vera Pezer, Sheila Rowan, Joyce McKee, Lenore Morrison Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
1974   Saskatchewan Emily Farnham, Linda Saunders, Pat McBeath, Donna Collins Victoria, British Columbia
1975   Quebec Lee Tobin, Marilyn McNeil, Michelle Garneau, Laurie Ross Moncton, New Brunswick
1976   British Columbia Lindsay Davie, Dawn Knowles, Robin Klassen, Lorraine Bowles Winnipeg, Manitoba
1977   Alberta Myrna McQuarrie, Rita Tarnava, Barb Davis, Jane Rempel Halifax, Nova Scotia
1978   Manitoba Cathy Pidzarko, Chris Pidzarko, Iris Armstrong, Patti Vanderkerckhove Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Finalist Locale Finalist Team Host
1979   British Columbia Lindsay Sparkes, Dawn Knowles, Robin Wilson, Lorraine Bowles   Manitoba Chris Pidzarko, Rose Tanasichuk, Iris Armstrong, Patti Vande Mount Royal, Quebec

Canadian Ladies Curling Association ChampionshipEdit

Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Finalist Locale Finalist Team Host
1980   Saskatchewan Marj Mitchell, Nancy Kerr, Shirley McKendry, Wendy Leach   Nova Scotia Colleen Jones, Sally Jane Saunders, Margaret Knickle, Barbara Jones Edmonton, Alberta
1981   Alberta Susan Seitz, Judy Erickson, Myrna McKay, Betty McCracken   Newfoundland Sue Anne Bartlett, Patricia Dwyer, Joyce Nichols, Jo Ann Bepperling St. John's, Newfoundland

Scott Tournament of HeartsEdit

Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Finalist Locale Finalist Team Host
1982   Nova Scotia Colleen Jones, Kay Smith, Monica Jones, Barbara Jones-Gordon   Manitoba Dorothy Rose, Lynne Andrews, Kim Crass, Shannon Burns Regina, Saskatchewan
1983   Nova Scotia Penny LaRocque, Sharon Horne, Cathy Caudle, Pam Sanford   Alberta Cathy Shaw, Christine Jurgenson, Sandra Rippel, Penny Ryan Prince George, British Columbia
1984   Manitoba Connie Laliberte, Chris More, Corinne Peters, Janet Arnott   Nova Scotia Colleen Jones, Wendy Currie, Monica Jones, Barbara Jones-Gordon Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
1985   British Columbia Linda Moore, Lindsay Sparkes, Debbie Jones, Laurie Carney   Newfoundland Sue Anne Bartlett, Patricia Dwyer, Margaret Knickle, Debra Herbert Winnipeg, Manitoba
1986   Ontario Marilyn Darte, Kathy McEdwards, Chris Jurgenson, Jan Augustyn   Canada Linda Moore, Lindsay Sparkes, Debbie Jones, Laurie Carney London, Ontario
1987   British Columbia Pat Sanders, Louise Herlinveaux, Georgina Hawkes, Deb Massullo   Manitoba Kathie Ellwood, Cathy Treloar, Laurie Ellwood, Sandra Asham Lethbridge, Alberta
1988   Ontario Heather Houston, Lorraine Lang, Diane Adams, Tracy Kennedy   Canada Pat Sanders, Louise Herlinveaux, Georgina Hawkes, Deb Massullo Fredericton, New Brunswick
1989   Canada Heather Houston, Lorraine Lang, Diane Adams, Tracy Kennedy   Manitoba Chris More, Karen Purdy, Lori Zeller, Kristin Kuruluk Kelowna, British Columbia
1990   Ontario Alison Goring, Kristin Turcotte, Andrea Lawes, Cheryl McPherson   Nova Scotia Heather Rankin, Beth Rankin, Judith Power, Suzanne Green Ottawa, Ontario
1991   British Columbia Julie Sutton, Jodie Sutton, Melissa Soligo, Karri Willms   New Brunswick Heidi Hanlon, Kathy Floyd, Sheri Stewart, Mary Harding Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
1992   Manitoba Connie Laliberte, Laurie Allen, Cathy Gauthier, Janet Arnott   Canada Julie Sutton, Jodi Sutton, Melissa Soligo, Karri Willms Halifax, Nova Scotia
1993   Saskatchewan Sandra Peterson, Jan Betker, Joan McCusker, Marcia Gudereit   Manitoba Maureen Bonar, Lois Fowler, Allyson Bell, Rhonda Fowler Brandon, Manitoba
1994   Canada Sandra Peterson, Jan Betker, Joan McCusker, Marcia Gudereit   Manitoba Connie Laliberte, Karen Purdy, Cathy Gauthier, Janet Arnott Waterloo, Ontario
1995   Manitoba Connie Laliberte, Cathy Overton, Cathy Gauthier, Janet Arnott   Alberta Cathy Borst, Maureen Brown, Deanne Shields, Kate Horne Calgary, Alberta
1996   Ontario Marilyn Bodogh, Kim Gellard, Corie Beveridge, Jane Hooper Perroud   Alberta Cheryl Kullman, Karen Ruus, Barb Sherrington, Judy Pendergast Thunder Bay, Ontario
1997   Saskatchewan Sandra Schmirler, Jan Betker, Joan McCusker, Marcia Gudereit   Ontario Alison Goring, Lori Eddy, Kim Moore, Mary Bowman Vancouver, British Columbia
1998   Alberta Cathy Borst, Heather Godberson, Brenda Bohmer, Kate Horne   Ontario Anne Merklinger, Theresa Breen, Patti McKnight, Audrey Frey Regina, Saskatchewan
1999   Nova Scotia Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt   Canada Cathy Borst, Heather Godberson, Brenda Bohmer, Kate Horne Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
2000   British Columbia Kelley Law, Julie Skinner, Georgina Wheatcroft, Diane Nelson   Ontario Anne Merklinger, Theresa Breen, Patti McKnight, Audrey Frey Prince George, British Columbia
2001   Nova Scotia Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt   Canada Kelley Law, Julie Skinner, Georgina Wheatcroft, Diane Nelson Sudbury, Ontario
2002   Canada Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt   Saskatchewan Sherry Anderson, Kim Hodson, Sandra Mulroney, Donna Gignac Brandon, Manitoba
2003   Canada Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Waye, Nancy Delahunt   Newfoundland and Labrador Cathy Cunningham, Peg Goss, Kathy Kerr, Heather Martin Kitchener, Ontario
2004   Canada Colleen Jones, Kim Kelly, Mary-Anne Arsenault, Nancy Delahunt   Quebec Marie-France Larouche, Karo Gagnon, Annie Lemay, Véronique Grégoire Red Deer, Alberta
2005   Manitoba Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Cathy Gauthier   Ontario Jenn Hanna, Pascale Letendre, Dawn Askin, Stephanie Hanna St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador
2006   British Columbia Kelly Scott, Jeanna Schraeder, Sasha Carter, Renee Simons   Canada Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Georgina Wheatcroft London, Ontario

Scotties Tournament of HeartsEdit

Tournament Winning Locale Winning Team Finalist Locale Finalist Team Host
2007   Canada Kelly Scott, Jeanna Schraeder, Sasha Carter, Renee Simons   Saskatchewan Jan Betker, Lana Vey, Nancy Inglis, Marcia Gudereit Lethbridge, Alberta
2008   Manitoba Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin   Alberta Shannon Kleibrink, Amy Nixon, Bronwen Saunders, Chelsey Bell Regina, Saskatchewan
2009   Canada Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin   British Columbia Marla Mallett, Grace MacInnes, Diane Gushulak, Jacalyn Brown Victoria, British Columbia
2010   Canada Jennifer Jones, Cathy Overton-Clapham, Jill Officer, Dawn Askin   Prince Edward Island Erin Carmody, Geri-Lynn Ramsay, Kathy O'Rourke, Tricia Affleck Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Tournament Gold Silver Bronze Host
Locale Team Locale Team Locale Team
2011   Saskatchewan Amber Holland
Kim Schneider
Tammy Schneider
Heather Kalenchuk
  Canada Jennifer Jones
Kaitlyn Lawes
Jill Officer
Dawn Askin
  Nova Scotia Heather Smith-Dacey
Danielle Parsons
Blisse Comstock
Teri Lake
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
2012   Alberta Heather Nedohin
Beth Iskiw
Jessica Mair
Laine Peters
  British Columbia Kelly Scott
Sasha Carter
Dailene Sivertson
Jacquie Armstrong
  Manitoba Jennifer Jones
Kaitlyn Lawes
Jill Officer
Dawn Askin
Red Deer, Alberta
2013   Ontario Rachel Homan
Emma Miskew
Alison Kreviazuk
Lisa Weagle
  Manitoba Jennifer Jones
Kaitlyn Lawes
Jill Officer
Dawn Askin
  British Columbia Kelly Scott
Jeanna Schraeder
Sasha Carter
Sarah Wazney
Kingston, Ontario
2014   Canada Rachel Homan
Emma Miskew
Alison Kreviazuk
Lisa Weagle
  Alberta Val Sweeting
Joanne Courtney
Dana Ferguson
Rachelle Pidherny
  Manitoba Chelsea Carey
Kristy McDonald
Kristen Foster
Lindsay Titheridge
Montreal, Quebec
2015   Manitoba Jennifer Jones
Kaitlyn Lawes
Jill Officer
Dawn McEwen
  Alberta Val Sweeting
Lori Olson-Johns
Dana Ferguson
Rachelle Brown
  Canada Rachel Homan
Emma Miskew
Joanne Courtney
Lisa Weagle
Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
2016   Alberta Chelsea Carey
Amy Nixon
Jocelyn Peterman
Laine Peters
  Northern Ontario Krista McCarville
Kendra Lilly
Ashley Sippala
Sarah Potts
  Canada Jennifer Jones
Kaitlyn Lawes
Jill Officer
Dawn McEwen
Grande Prairie, Alberta
2017   Ontario Rachel Homan
Emma Miskew
Joanne Courtney
Lisa Weagle
  Manitoba Michelle Englot
Kate Cameron
Leslie Wilson-Westcott
Raunora Westcott
  Canada Chelsea Carey
Amy Nixon
Jocelyn Peterman
Laine Peters
St. Catharines, Ontario
2018   Manitoba Jennifer Jones
Shannon Birchard
Jill Officer
Dawn McEwen
  Wild Card Kerri Einarson
Selena Kaatz
Liz Fyfe
Kristin MacCuish
  Nova Scotia Mary-Anne Arsenault
Christina Black
Jenn Baxter
Jennifer Crouse
Penticton, British Columbia
2019   Alberta Chelsea Carey
Sarah Wilkes
Dana Ferguson
Rachelle Brown
  Ontario Rachel Homan
Emma Miskew
Joanne Courtney
Lisa Weagle
  Saskatchewan Robyn Silvernagle
Stefanie Lawton
Jessie Hunkin
Kara Thevenot
Sydney, Nova Scotia
2020 Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan[2]

Top 3 finishes tableEdit

As of the 2019 Scotties Tournament of Hearts

Province / Locale 1st 2nd 3rd Total
  Saskatchewan 11 6 8 25
  Manitoba 10 12 8 30
  British Columbia 9 8 10 27
  Canada 9 7 7 23
  Alberta 8 10 4 22
  Ontario 6 7 13 26
  Nova Scotia 4 3 6 13
  Quebec 1 2 3 6
  New Brunswick 1 2 1 4
  Newfoundland and Labrador 0 3 3 6
  Prince Edward Island 0 2 2 4
  Northern Ontario 0 1 0 1
 Wild Card 0 1 0 1
  Yukon/Northwest Territories 0 0 1 1
  Northwest Territories
  Nunavut
  Yukon

Award winnersEdit

Sandra Schmirler Most Valuable Player AwardEdit

The Sandra Schmirler Most Valuable Player Award is awarded by the media to the most valuable player during the playoffs at the Scotties Tournament of Hearts. The 2019 winner was Chelsea Carey of Alberta.[3]

Shot of the Week AwardEdit

The Shot of the Week Award is presented by the organizing committee to the player who makes the most outstanding shot during the tournament. The award has not been presented since 2013.

Marj Mitchell Sportsmanship AwardEdit

The Marj Mitchell Sportsmanship Award is awarded annually to the most sportsmanlike curler at the Tournament of Hearts every year. The award has been presented since 1982, and has been named in Mitchell's honour since 1998. In 2019, the Marj Mitchell Sportsmanship Award was presented to Sarah Potts of Northern Ontario.[4]

Joan Mead Builder AwardEdit

The Joan Mead Builder Award goes to someone in the curling community that significantly contributes to the growth and development of women's curling in Canada. It has been awarded annually since 2001.

Winners

All-Star teamsEdit

2019[12]

First Team

Second Team

2018[13]

First Team

Second Team

2017[10]

First Team

Second Team

2016[14]

First Team

Second Team

2015

First Team

Second Team

2014[8]

First Team

Second Team

2013[7]

First Team

Second Team

2012[15]

First Team

Second Team

2011

First Team

Second Team

2010

First Team

Second Team

2009

First Team

Second Team

2008

First Team

Second Team

2007

First Team

Second Team

2006

First Team

Second Team

2005

First Team

Second Team

2004

First Team

Second Team

2003

First Team

Second Team

2002

First Team

Second Team

2001

First Team

Second Team

2000

First Team

Second Team

1999

First Team

Second Team

1998

First Team

Second Team

1997

First Team

Second Team

1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
1982

Ford Hot ShotsEdit

RecordsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "History of the Scotties » Curling Canada: 2016 Scotties Tournament of Hearts 2". www.curling.ca. Retrieved 2018-08-16.
  2. ^ Staff writer (October 25, 2018). "Scotties headed back to Moose Jaw in 2020". Regina Leader-Post. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  3. ^ Strong, Gregory (February 24, 2019). "Alberta's Carey beats Ontario's Homan to win Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Winnipeg Free Press. The Canadian Press. Retrieved February 25, 2019.
  4. ^ Chronicle-Journal Staff; The Canadian Press (February 23, 2019). "McCarville bows out of Scotties". The Chronicle-Journal. Thunder Bay. The Canadian Press. Retrieved February 24, 2019.
  5. ^ "Saskatchewan's Amber Holland named MVP". Canadian Curling Association. 28 February 2011.
  6. ^ "Heather Nedohin named MVP at 2012 Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Canadian Curling Association. 26 February 2012.
  7. ^ a b "All-Star teams announced at 2013 Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Canadian Curling Association. 23 February 2013. Retrieved 23 February 2013.
  8. ^ a b Mills, Jean (2014-02-09). "Scotties All-Stars, Sportsmanship and Builder Award winners announced - 2014 Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Curling.ca. Retrieved 2014-02-27.
  9. ^ "Scotties awards presented to Howard, Sonnenberg". Canadian Curling Association. 27 February 2016. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  10. ^ a b Cameron, Al (February 24, 2017). "Award winners, all-stars announced at 2017 Scotties". Curling Canada. Retrieved February 25, 2017.
  11. ^ Granger, Grant (27 January 2018). "Team Einarson scores historic Scotties wild-card win". Curling Canada. Retrieved 28 January 2018.
  12. ^ a b Jahns, Kyle (February 24, 2019). "Award winners and all-stars announced at Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Curling Canada. Retrieved February 24, 2019.
  13. ^ McCormick, Murray (4 February 2018). "Jones back on top, capturing Scotties women's curling championship". Toronto Sun. Postmedia News. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
  14. ^ "All-stars announced at 2016 Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Canadian Curling Association. 26 February 2016. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  15. ^ "All Stars and Sportsmanship Winner Declared at 2012 Scotties Tournament of Hearts". Canadian Curling Association. 25 February 2012.
  16. ^ 2018 Scotties Media Guide

External links and sourcesEdit