Scott Edelman (/ˈɛdəlmən/; born 1955) is an American science fiction, fantasy, and horror writer and editor.

Scott Edelman
Scott Edelman at the 2007 World Fantasy Convention
Born1955 (age 68–69)
NationalityAmerican
Area(s)Writer, Editor
www.scottedelman.com Edit this at Wikidata

Career edit

In the 1970s, he worked in American comic books, in particular writing horror comics for both Marvel Comics and DC Comics. For Marvel he created the Scarecrow, and wrote some stories involving Captain America, Captain Marvel, and Omega the Unknown. He edited two issues of Marvel's self-produced fan magazine, FOOM, in the mid-1970s.

Edelman has also written a number of short stories, the Lambda Award-nominated novel The Gift,[1] and written for television, including work for Hanna-Barbera and several episodes of Tales from the Darkside.

He was the founding and only editor of the science fiction magazine Science Fiction Age, which was published by Sovereign Media Co. from 1992 until 2000.[2] He published and edited the semi-professional magazine Last Wave from 1982 to 1985, which was billed as "The Last Best Hope of Speculative Fiction" and published short fiction by Thomas M. Disch, Avram Davidson, and Ian Watson among other established authors. He was the founding editor of Rampage, a magazine covering professional wrestling, and has written unauthorized biographies of wrestlers Chyna and Stone Cold Steve Austin. Other magazines edited by Edelman include Sci-Fi Universe, Sci-Fi Flix, and Satellite Orbit.

In December 1996, while still the editor of Science Fiction Age, Edelman also became editor of Sovereign Media's Sci-Fi Entertainment, the official print magazine of the Sci-Fi Channel. He left Sovereign Media, and his role at Sci-Fi Entertainment (by then renamed SCI FI magazine), in June 2000, but returned to be editor of Sci-Fi Channel's online magazine, Science Fiction Weekly, before transferring back to be editor of SCI FI in February 2002.

Edelman wrote stories that were included in Eden Studios's zombie anthologies edited by James Lowder.[3]: 341 

Awards edit

Awards for Scott Edelman's writing
Year Title Award Result Ref.
1991 The Gift Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Science Fiction/Fantasy Finalist [4]
2007 Almost the Last Story by Almost the Last Man Bram Stoker Award for Best Long Fiction Finalist [5]
2009 The Hunger of Empty Vessels Bram Stoker Award for Best Long Fiction Finalist [6]
2010 What Will Come After Shirley Jackson Award for Single-Author Collection Finalist
2015 Becoming Invisible, Becoming Seen Bram Stoker Award for Best Long Fiction Finalist [7][8]
2016 That Perilous Stuff Bram Stoker Award for Best Long Fiction Finalist [9]
2017 "Faking it Until Forever Comes" Bram Stoker Award for Best Long Fiction Finalist [10][11][12]

Publications edit

Novellas edit

  • The Gift (1990)
  • These Words Are Haunted (2001)
  • What We Still Talk About (2008)
  • The Hunger of Empty Vessels (2009)
  • What Will Come After (2010)
  • "Almost the Last Story by Almost the Last Man" in The Living Dead, edited by John Joseph Adams (2008)
  • Things That Never Happened (2010)
  • Liars, Fakers, and the Dead Who Eat Them, illustrated by Daniele Serra (2017)
  • Tell Me Like You Done Before: And Other Stories Written on the Shoulders of Giants (2018)

Comics edit

  • Captain Marvel #49 (1977)
  • Captain Marvel #50 (1977)
  • Captain Marvel #51 (1977)
  • Captain Marvel #52 (1977)
  • Captain Marvel #53 (1977)
  • Captain Marvel #54 (1978)
  • Captain Marvel #55 (1978)
  • Doorway to Nightmare #5 (1978)
  • Marvel Masterworks: Captain Marvel, Vol. 5 (2014)

Biographies edit

  • Texas Rattlesnake (2000)
  • Warrior Queen: The Totally Unauthorized Story of Joanie Laurer (2000)

References edit

  1. ^ "3rd Annual Lambda Literary Awards". Lambda Literary Foundation. July 13, 1991. Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved July 3, 2013.
  2. ^ "May 2000 issue of Science Fiction Age will be its last". Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (Press release). Sovereign Media Co. 2000-02-11. Archived from the original on 2002-01-10. Retrieved 2023-10-09.
  3. ^ Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. ISBN 978-1-907702- 58-7.
  4. ^ "3rd Annual Lambda Literary Awards". Lambda Literary Foundation. July 13, 1991. Archived from the original on March 29, 2015. Retrieved July 3, 2013.
  5. ^ "2007 Bram Stoker Award Winners & Nominees". The Bram Stoker Awards. Archived from the original on 2022-05-05. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  6. ^ "2009 Bram Stoker Award Winners & Nominees". The Bram Stoker Awards. Archived from the original on 2022-08-09. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  7. ^ "2015 Bram Stoker Award Nominees & Winners". The Bram Stoker Awards. Archived from the original on 2022-08-10. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  8. ^ "2015 Bram Stoker Awards® Winners". Horror Writers Association. 15 May 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-08-23. Retrieved 2017-03-21.
  9. ^ "2016 Bram Stoker Award Winners & Nominees". The Bram Stoker Awards. Archived from the original on 2020-09-27. Retrieved 2020-08-13.
  10. ^ "2017 Bram Stoker Award® Winners & Nominees". The Bram Stoker Awards. Archived from the original on 2022-08-13. Retrieved 2022-06-21.
  11. ^ "2017 Stoker Awards Winners". Locus Online. 2018-03-05. Archived from the original on 2022-07-06. Retrieved 2022-07-06.
  12. ^ "Announcing the 2017 Bram Stoker Awards Winners". Tor.com. 2018-03-05. Archived from the original on 2020-11-28. Retrieved 2022-07-06.

External links edit