Open main menu

Saxony state election, 2014

A state election was held on 31 August 2014 in the state of Saxony in Germany, as required by the state constitution. Minister-President Stanislaw Tillich sought to retain power.

Saxony state election, 2014

← 2009 31 August 2014 2019 →

All 126 seats of the Landtag of Saxony
64 seats needed for a majority
Turnout49.2%
  First party Second party Third party
  SACHSEN CDU 13.06.20130123 - Portrait.jpg Rico Gebhardt Landtag Sachsen by Stepro IMG 1841 LR50.jpg Martin Dulig 2014 BZ.jpg
Leader Stanislaw Tillich Rico Gebhardt Martin Dulig
Party CDU Left SPD
Last election 58 seats, 40.2% 29 seats, 20.6% 14 seats, 10.4%
Seats won 59 27 18
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease2 Increase4
Popular vote 645,344 309,568 202,374
Percentage 39.4% 18.9% 12.4%
Swing Decrease 0.8% Decrease1.7% Increase2.0%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Frauke-Petry-20130820.jpg Antje Hermenau by Stepro IMG 1455 LR50.jpg
Leader Frauke Petry Antje Hermenau
Volkmar Zschocke
Holger Szymanski
Party AfD Green NPD
Last election Did not contest 9 seats, 6.4% 8 seats, 5.6%
Seats won 14 8 0
Seat change Increase14 Decrease1 Decrease 8
Popular vote 159,547 93,852 81,060
Percentage 9.7% 5.7% 4.95%
Swing Increase9.7% Decrease0.7% Decrease 0.6%

  Seventh party
  HolgerZastrow.jpg
Leader Holger Zastrow
Party FDP
Last election 14 seats, 10.0%
Seats won 0
Seat change Decrease14
Popular vote 61,847
Percentage 3.8%
Swing Decrease 6.2%

Sachsen Landtagswahlkarte 2014.svg

Minister-President before election

Stanislaw Tillich
CDU

Minister-President after election

Stanislaw Tillich
CDU

Contents

BackgroundEdit

After the previous state election in 2009, the CDU emerged as the largest party and formed a coalition with the FDP, ending their coalition with the SPD. Thus, before the 2014 election, the Saxony state government was the only government nationwide that involved the FDP. Due to the national decline in support for the FDP, a continuation of this coalition seemed unlikely as it was uncertain whether the FDP would reach the 5% threshold necessary to gain seats.

The largest opposition party in Saxony was the Left Party. One possible outcome, according to the polls, would have been a coalition between the Left, the SPD and the Greens; however this option was rejected by both the SPD and the Greens before the election.

For the SPD, the state election in Saxony was the second electoral test after the European elections since being involved (from 2013) at the federal level as junior partners in the coalition government. Polls show that the public perceived the work of the SPD in government as positive. Issues that have been worked on by the government were primarily election promises of the SPD. Despite this, all polls suggested that the SPD would be heading for another third-place finish. In Saxony, the SPD's election campaign was highly tailored to their leading candidate, Martin Dulig, who also involved his family in the campaign. Dulig was also supported by former chancellor Schröder.

The AfD was hoping to gain its first representation in a state parliament in Saxony after the party had achieved its strongest results nationwide in both the federal elections and European elections in Saxony.[1] In the European elections, the party in Saxony received over 10% of the vote, compared to 7% nationwide.

In 2004, the far-right NPD secured their best ever result at a state election in Saxony. Since then, polls and election results have trended downwards with most polls suggesting the party would not cross the 5% threshold.

The Pirate Party achieved 1.9% of the vote in the previous state election. Despite early polling showing its support up to as much as 9% in Saxony, the party has since lost support and was averaging around just 2% in surveys.

Coalition talks before electionEdit

Polls suggested that the CDU would again be the largest party. The Minister-President Stanislaw Tillich (CDU) was therefore expected to lead coalition negotiations. In addition to the SPD, the Greens hoped for a coalition with the CDU, but a "black-green" coalition was considered unlikely because the Greens oppose coal mining in Saxony.[2]

Prior to the election, Tillich could imagine a coalition with the FDP, the SPD, the Greens and the AfD. For Carsten Linnemann, the chairman of the CDU/CSU-Business Association, a coalition with the Greens was a viable alternative if the FDP did not obtain any seats.[3] Even a coalition with the AfD was not ruled out by Tillich, although the federal head of the CDU had previously spoken out against it.[4]

The Left was unlikely to overtake the CDU, according to polls. The party wanted to form a coalition with the SPD in particular. The SPD, however, were skeptical towards such an alliance.[5] The NPD was not considered in the debate on coalitions with other parties.

Opinion pollsEdit

Pollster Date CDU Left SPD FDP Greens NPD Pirates AfD Others
FGW 21.08.2014 39% 20% 15% 3% 6% 5% 7% 5%
uniQma 18.08.2014 42% 18% 13% 3% 6% 4% 1% 6% 7%
IM Field 09.08.2014 43% 20% 14% 3% 7% 3% 5% 5%
INSA 09.08.2014 40% 19% 14% 5% 5% 4% 6% 6%
dimap 10.07.2014 42% 21% 13% 4% 7% 3% 7% 3%
Forsa 20.06.2014 42% 18% 15% 3% 6% 3% 8% 5%
uniQma 13.06.2014 45% 16% 13% 3% 6% 3% 2% 7% 5%
dimap 30.04.2014 43% 18% 16% 4% 6% 4% 6% 3%
dimap 29.03.2014 45% 17% 15% 4% 6% 4% 6% 3%
INSA 08.03.2014 43% 22% 15% 2% 5% 1% 7% 2%
uniQma 02.01.2014 49% 15% 17% 2% 6% 1% 2% 6% 2%
dimap 20.08.2013 45% 14% 14% 5% 11% 3% 3% 5%
Emnid 09.04.2013 43% 19% 16% 5% 7% 4% 4% 2%
TNS Infratest 08.09.2012 41% 19% 16% 4% 7% 3% 7% 3%
dimap 05.09.2012 44% 15% 16% 5% 8% 2% 4% 6%
Emnid 15.03.2012 43% 18% 14% 2% 10% 2% 9%
IfM Leipzig 16.10.2011 44% 17% 12% 2% 11% 3% 8%
dimap 24.08.2011 43% 19% 12% 6% 11% 5% 4%
aproxima 28.06.2011 42% 21% 15% 6% 8% 3% 5%
aproxima 24.08.2010 42% 23% 16% 5% 7% 4% 3%
IfM Leipzig 14.06.2010 40% 20% 16% 6% 12% 3% 3%
2009 results 30.08.2009 40.2% 20.6% 10.4% 10.0% 6.4% 5.6% 1.9% 4.9%

ResultsEdit

e • d Summary of the 31 August 2014 Landtag of Saxony elections results
< 2009     Next >
Party Popular vote Seats
Votes % +/– Seats +/–
Christian Democratic Union
Christlich Demokratische Union Deutschlands – CDU
645,344 39.4  0.8 59  1
Left
Die Linke
309,568 18.9  1.7 27  2
Social Democratic Party of Germany
Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands – SPD
202,374 12.4  2.0 18  4
Alternative for Germany
Alternative für Deutschland – AfD
159,547 9.7  9.7 14  14
Alliance '90/The Greens
Bündnis 90/Die Grünen
93,852 5.7  0.7 8  1
National Democratic Party of Germany
Nationaldemokratische Partei Deutschlands – NPD
81,060 5.0
(4.95)
 0.6 0  8
Free Democratic Party
Freie Demokratische Partei – FDP
61,847 3.8  6.2 0  14
Other parties 83,776 5.1  1.7 0  
Valid votes 1,637,364 98.7  0.5
Invalid votes 22,281 1.3  0.5
Totals and voter turnout 1,659,645 49.2  3.0 126  6
Electorate 3,375,734 100.00
Source: Wahlrecht.de

Government formationEdit

The CDU was obliged to seek new coalition partners, as their previous partner, the FDP failed to win any seats.[6] Tillich ruled out a coalition with the AfD.[7]

The CDU held exploratory talks with the Greens and the SPD. The talks between the CDU and the Greens ended without results; the Greens claimed that education policy and energy policy were the sticking points. Antje Hermenau, the Greens' lead candidate, then resigned on 20 September.[8]

Coalition talks started on 19 September between the CDU and the SPD. On 9 November 2014 the SPD announced that 82,2 % of its members had voted for the coalition agreement between the CDU and SPD.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Reinbold, Fabian (7 August 2014). "Radtour mit der AfD in Sachsen: Viel Deutschland, wenig Alternativen". Spiegel Online (in German). Retrieved 2017-09-25.
  2. ^ Sirleschtov, Antje (16 August 2014). "Tillich schließt Koalitionsgespräche mit AfD nicht aus". Der Tagesspiegel Online (in German). ISSN 1865-2263. Retrieved 2017-09-25.
  3. ^ "Unions-Mittelstandschef Linnemann offen für Schwarz-Grün". Focus Online (in German). 2 August 2014. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  4. ^ "Bundes-CDU untersagt Bündnis mit AfD". Tagesschau. 26 August 2014. Archived from the original on 27 August 2014. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  5. ^ Machowecz, Martin (10 July 2014). "Rot-rote Koalition: Gehen die zusammen?". Zeit Online (in German). Archived from the original on 23 February 2017. Retrieved 25 September 2017.
  6. ^ "German anti-euro party enters state parliament in Saxony elections". Deutsche Welle. 31 August 2014. Retrieved 2017-09-25.
  7. ^ Brown, Stephen; Breidthardt, Annika (31 August 2014). "Merkel's conservatives set to hold Saxony, eurosceptics make breakthrough". Reuters U.K. Retrieved 2017-09-25.
  8. ^ "Sächsische Grüne verlieren ihr Aushängeschild". stern (in German). 20 September 2014. Retrieved 2017-09-25.
  9. ^ "Mitgliedervotum". SPD Sachsen (in German). 7 October 2014. Retrieved 2017-09-25.

External linksEdit