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The Sarnia Sting are a junior ice hockey team based in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. They are one of the 20 teams that make up the Ontario Hockey League. They play out of the Progressive Auto Sales Arena[4] (formerly the Sarnia Sports and Entertainment Centre).

Sarnia Sting
Sarnia Sting logo (2016).svg
CitySarnia, Ontario
LeagueOntario Hockey League
ConferenceWestern
DivisionWest
Founded1994 (1994)–95
Home arenaProgressive Auto Sales Arena
(capacity: 5,300)
ColoursBlack, white and gold
              
Owner(s)Derian Hatcher
David Legwand[1]
General managerNick Sinclair[2]
Head coachDerian Hatcher[3]
Affiliate(s)Sarnia Legionnaires
Strathroy Rockets
Websitewww.sarniasting.com
Franchise history
1969–1992Cornwall Royals
1992–1994Newmarket Royals
1994–presentSarnia Sting

On January 22, 2015, now retired NHL forward David Legwand, who played for the Ottawa Senators at the time, and retired NHL defenseman Derian Hatcher entered an agreement to purchase the Sarnia Sting.[5] The transfer of ownership was approved by the OHL Board of Governors and completed on March 4, 2015.[6]

Contents

HistoryEdit

 
Sting vs. Spitfires - January 2012

The franchise was granted in 1969 as one of the inaugural teams of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. At the time, the team was located in Cornwall, Ontario and known as the Cornwall Royals. During the team's tenure in the QMJHL the Royals won the Memorial Cup in 1972, 1980, and in 1981.[citation needed]

For the 1981–82 season, the team transferred to the Ontario Hockey League. In 1992, the franchise moved again to Newmarket, Ontario to play as the Newmarket Royals.[citation needed]

In 1994, the team was bought by the Ciccarelli brothers and moved to Sarnia, Ontario. Robert Ciccarelli, voted OHL Executive of the Year in 1999–2000,[7] was the team's president and governor until January 2015, when the team was sold to its current owners, former NHL defenseman Derian Hatcher and former NHL forward David Legwand.[8]

In 2018, Dan Carcillo made accusations of hazing during the 2002–03 OHL season.[9] League commissioner David Branch responded with sanctions against the Sting.[10] The club implemented changes in its routines to avoid further incidents.[11]

ChampionshipsEdit

The Sarnia Sting are in quest of their first J. Ross Robertson Cup and first Memorial Cup. The 1996–97 season was the closest the team came to the OHL Championship, but lost in the quarter-finals to Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 3. The lone title so far came in the 2003–04 season, when the team won the OHL West Division, winning the Bumbacco Trophy, but were later eliminated in the first round of the playoffs. The Sarnia Sting won their second West Division title in 2016. They beat the Guelph Storm 7-1 to clinch the division. That was their first division title in 12 years. On Saturday March 19, 2016 the Sarnia Sting broke a franchise record from 2002-2003 capturing 41 wins and 91 points to end the 2015-2016 OHL season.

CoachesEdit

List of Coaches

Multiple seasons in parentheses.

PlayersEdit

Award winnersEdit

Retired numbersEdit

On January 12, 2018, the Sarnia Sting officially retired the first number in franchise history, Steven Stamkos' number 91. There are also banners in honour of Shawn Burr and Kerry Fraser. Banners that were once hung, but have since been taken down, include the ones of Aaron Brand and Peter Sarno who both won OHL scoring titles, Trevor Letowski, who all participated at IIHF World U20 Championships in 1997, and Danny Fritsche who won gold with the United States men's national junior ice hockey team in 2004.

NHL alumniEdit

Yearly resultsEdit

Regular seasonEdit

Legend: OT = Overtime loss, SL = Shootout loss

Season Games Won Lost Tied OT SL Points Pct % Goals
For
Goals
Against
Standing
1994–95 66 24 37 5 - - 53 0.402 250 292 3rd Western
1995–96 66 39 23 4 - - 82 0.621 330 276 2nd Western
1996–97 66 35 24 7 - - 77 0.583 286 251 2nd Western
1997–98 66 32 21 13 - - 77 0.583 253 227 3rd Western
1998–99 68 37 25 6 - - 80 0.588 279 216 2nd West
1999–2000 68 33 27 8 - - 74 0.544 211 189 3rd West
2000–01 68 28 31 7 2 - 65 0.463 235 244 3rd West
2001–02 68 27 29 5 7 - 66 0.434 236 260 4th West
2002–03 68 41 19 7 1 - 90 0.654 234 223 2nd West
2003–04 68 37 23 4 4 - 82 0.574 220 210 1st West
2004–05 68 16 41 6 5 - 43 0.316 156 228 5th West
2005–06 68 17 46 - 2 3 39 0.287 197 295 5th West
2006–07 68 34 24 - 5 5 78 0.574 270 241 4th West
2007–08 68 37 29 - 2 0 76 0.559 251 229 3rd West
2008–09 68 35 26 - 4 3 77 0.566 216 210 4th West
2009–10 68 17 46 - 3 2 39 0.287 184 295 5th West
2010–11 68 25 36 - 5 2 57 0.419 243 321 4th West
2011–12 68 34 27 - 2 5 75 0.551 243 235 2nd West
2012–13 68 35 28 - 1 4 75 0.551 247 254 3rd West
2013–14 68 17 44 - 2 5 41 0.301 211 341 5th West
2014–15 68 29 32 - 4 3 65 0.478 232 263 3rd West
2015–16 68 42 19 - 5 2 91 0.669 254 192 1st West
2016–17 68 31 30 - 6 1 69 0.507 257 277 4th West
2017–18 68 46 17 - 4 1 97 0.713 299 213 2nd West
2018–19 68 28 33 - 5 2 63 0.463 271 300 3rd West
Total 1,692 776 737 72 69 38 1,731 0.512 6,065 6,282 2 Division Titles

PlayoffsEdit

  • 1994–95 Lost to Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 0 in division quarter-finals.
  • 1995–96 Defeated S.S. Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 0 in division quarter-finals.
    Lost to Peterborough Petes 4 games to 2 in quarter-finals.
  • 1996–97 Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 1 in division quarter-finals.
    Lost to Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 3 in quarter-finals.
  • 1997–98 Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 1 in division quarter-finals.
  • 1998–99 Lost to London Knights 4 games to 2 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 1999–00 Lost to Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 3 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2000–01 Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 0 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2001–02 Lost to Erie Otters 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2002–03 Lost to Guelph Storm 4 games to 2 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2003–04 Lost to Erie Otters 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2004–05 DNQ
  • 2005–06 DNQ
  • 2006–07 Lost to Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 0 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2007–08 Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
    Lost to Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 0 in conference semi-finals.
  • 2008–09 Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2009-10 DNQ
  • 2010-11 DNQ
  • 2011–12 Lost to Saginaw Spirit 4 games to 2 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2012–13 Lost to Plymouth Whalers 4 games to 0 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2013-14 DNQ
  • 2014–15 Lost to Erie Otters 4 games to 1 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2015–16 Lost to Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 4 games to 3 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2016–17 Lost to Erie Otters 4 games to 0 in conference quarter-finals.
  • 2017–18 Defeated Windsor Spitfires 4 games to 2 in conference quarter-finals.
    Lost to Kitchener Rangers 4 games to 2 in conference semi-finals.
  • 2018–19 Lost to Saginaw Spirit 4 games to 0 in conference quarter-finals.

Jerseys and logosEdit

 
The original Sarnia Sting jersey logo

The original Sarnia Sting jersey (worn from 1994/95 - 1998/99) showed a bee playing hockey with its stinger poised. The team's colours were black, white and silver. An alternate jersey (worn from 1997/98 - 1998/99) had a yellow background and a bee holding a stick about the Sarnia name on the chest.

The current jerseys include a white jersey with a bee in the center and a black jersey with "Sarnia" written across the front. During the first half of the season, the team wears the white uniform at home while during the second half of the season they wear the black uniform at home.

During the 2012 offseason the team held a contest to design the team's alternate jersey for the season. The new jersey is yellow with black and white stripes down the arm. The logo is round and includes a picture of the Blue Water Bridge in the background with a bee in the center. Around the bridges and the bee it is inscribed "Sarnia Sting" on top and "Hockey Club" on the bottom.

ArenasEdit

Relocation from Newmarket, Ontario in 1994 was made on the promise that a new arena would be built in Sarnia. In the meantime the team played their first four seasons at Sarnia Arena located in the downtown area.

In 1998–99 the Sting played their first season at their new home, The Sarnia Sports and Entertainment Centre (now known as the Progressive Auto Sales Arena). It's a more modern facility with private boxes and many other amenities. The new building also hosted the Ontario Hockey League All Star Game in 1999, and the RE/Max Canada-Russia Challenge in 2004.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sting Office". Sarnia Sting. Retrieved 2 December 2016.
  2. ^ "Nick Sinclair – General Manager". Sarnia Sting. Retrieved 2 December 2016.
  3. ^ "Hockey Operations". Sarnia Sting. Retrieved 2 December 2016.
  4. ^ Simpson, Barbara (8 August 2016). "Council endorses Progressive deal". Sarnia Observer. Retrieved 10 August 2016.
  5. ^ Bridge, Terry (22 January 2015). "Sarnia Sting sold to new owners". Sarnia Observer. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  6. ^ Ricks, Matt (4 March 2015). "Legwand and Hatcher, New Owners of Sarnia Sting". Retrieved 11 April 2017.
  7. ^ "OHL Recognizes Karmanos and Ciccarelli". Ontario Hockey League. 13 August 2015. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  8. ^ "Sarnia Sting sold to Derian Hatcher and David Legwand". Sarnia Observer. Postmedia Network. 22 January 2015. Retrieved 8 December 2016.
  9. ^ https://www.cbc.ca/sports/hockey/nhl/carcillo-hazing-hockey-ohl-1.4920922
  10. ^ https://www.cbc.ca/sports/hockey/nhl/david-branch-daniel-carcillo-ohl-sarnia-sting-haze-1.4926593
  11. ^ https://www.cambridgetimes.ca/community-story/9060342-former-cambridge-hockey-player-fortunate-to-miss-hazing-in-sarnia/

External linksEdit