Sarah Tarlow

Sarah Tarlow is a British archaeologist and academic. As Professor of Historical archaeology at the University of Leicester, Tarlow is best known for her work on the archaeology of death and burial. In 2012, Tarlow was awarded the Chair in Archaeology at the University of Leicester.

Sarah Tarlow
Born1967 (age 52–53)
NationalityUnited Kingdom
OccupationArchaeologist, academic
Academic background
Education
Academic work
DisciplineHistorical archaeology
Institutions
Notable worksThe Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial

BiographyEdit

Sarah Tarlow was born in 1967. She obtained a BA in 1989 from Sheffield University, a MPhil (1990) and a PhD (1995) from Cambridge University.[1] Tarlow taught at the University of Wales, Lampeter from 1995 to 2000. In 2000, she became a lecturer in Historical archaeology at the University of Leicester, and in 2006 was promoted to Senior Lecturer. In 2012, Tarlow was awarded the Chair in Archaeology.[1][2]

Tarlow's research focuses on the Historical archaeology of Great Britain and Northern Europe. She has published several books, journals and edited anthologies on the archaeology of death and burial, including the Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial (Oxford Handbooks). Tarlow also studies the archaeology of emotion and issues of archaeological ethics.[2]

From 2011—2016, Tarlow directed the large-scale research project, Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse, funded by the Wellcome Trust. The study focused on the period between the sixteenth century and the twentieth century, and investigated the management, treatment and uses of the criminal corpse in Britain. The project's overall goal was an examination and discussion of the "changing ideas of self and person as they relate to the body".[2][3]

Selected PublicationsEdit

JournalsEdit

  • Tarlow, Sarah (2016). "Curious afterlives: the enduring appeal of the criminal corpse". Mortality (Abingdon, England). 21 (3): 210–228. doi:10.1080/13576275.2016.1181328. PMC 4917903. PMID 27366110..
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2014). "The Technology of the Gibbet". International Journal of Historical Archaeology. 18 (4): 668–699. doi:10.1007/s10761-014-0275-0. PMC 4372825. PMID 25834380. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2000). "Emotion in Archaeology". Current Anthropology. 41 (5): 713–746. doi:10.1086/317404.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2000). "Landscapes of memory: the nineteenth century garden cemetery". European Journal of Archaeology. 3 (2): 217–239. doi:10.1179/eja.2000.3.2.217. Retrieved 26 November 2018.

BooksEdit

  • Tarlow, Sarah; Battell Lowman, Emma (2018). Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse. Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife. Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2017). The Golden and Ghoulish Age of the Gibbet in Britain. Palgrave Historical Studies in the Criminal Corpse and its Afterlife). Palgrave MacMillan.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2015). The Archaeology of Death in Post-medieval Europe. Sciendo. ISBN 978-3110439724.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2013). Ritual, Belief and the Dead in Early Modern Britain and Ireland. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1107667983.
  • Tarlow, Sarah; Nilsson, Liv, eds. (2013). The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial (Oxford Handbooks). Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0199569069.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (2007). The Archaeology of Improvement: Britain 1750-1850. Cambridge University Press.
  • Tarlow, Sarah (1999). Bereavement and Commemoration, An Archaeology of Mortality. Wiley-Blackwell. ISBN 978-0631206149.
  • Tarlow, Sarah; West, Susie (1999). Familiar Past?: Archaeologies of Later Historical Britain. Routledge. ISBN 978-0415188050.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Tarlow, Sarah (2000). "Emotion in Archaeology1". Current Anthropology. 41 (5): 713–746. doi:10.1086/317404.
  2. ^ a b c "Dr. Sarah Tarlow". University of Leicester. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  3. ^ "The Powerful Corpse: Dr. Sarah Tarlow on England's Criminal Corpses". Atlas Obscura. Retrieved 26 November 2018.

External linksEdit