Samuel L. Stanley

Samuel L. Stanley Jr. (born January 11, 1954) is an American educator, biomedical researcher and the president of Michigan State University. He formerly served as the president of Stony Brook University.[1][2][3] Stanley is married to Ellen Li, a practicing gastroenterologist and active researcher.

Samuel L. Stanley Jr.
Portrait-samuel-l-stanley-2020.png
21st President of Michigan State University
Assumed office
August 1, 2019
Preceded bySatish Udpa (acting)
Lou Anna Simon
5th President of Stony Brook University
In office
July 1, 2009 – July 31, 2019
Preceded byShirley Strum Kenny
Succeeded byMichael A. Bernstein (interim)
Maurie D. McInnis
Personal details
Born
Samuel Leonard Stanley Jr.

(1954-01-11)January 11, 1954
Seattle, Washington, U.S.
SpouseEllen Li
Children4
Alma materUniversity of Chicago
Harvard University
Washington University in St. Louis
Scientific career
FieldsBiological Sciences, medicine, pathogenesis, genomics
Institutions

On May 28, 2019, Stanley was named president of Michigan State University,[4] officially assuming his position on August 1.[5]

On May 12, 2009, Stanley was named the fifth president of Stony Brook University, a position he formally assumed on July 1, 2009, making him the first physician to serve as Stony Brook University's president.[6] Stanley is one of the founding directors of the Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research.[1][2]

Early life and educationEdit

Samuel L. Stanley Jr. attended Winston Churchill High School, a National Blue Ribbon School, located in Potomac, Maryland and graduated in 1972. He then attended The College of the University of Chicago where he graduated with honors in Biological Sciences in 1976 and was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa in the same year.[1][2][3][7] As an Albert Schweitzer fellow of Harvard Medical School, Stanley received his MD specializing in Internal Medicine in 1980.[1][8]

CareerEdit

He served as a medical intern at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1980 and 1981 and stayed to complete his residency in Internal Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.[1] He was appointed as an associate member of the American College of Physicians.[1] During his time at Mass General, Stanley met colleague and future wife, Dr. Ellen Li, who was concurrently completing her residency in internal medicine.[9]

Between 1983 and 1984, Stanley was a fellow in infectious diseases at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.[1][2][10][11] While there, he was a Pfizer Postdoctoral Fellow in microbiology and immunology.[1] He became a professor in the department of medicine, and served in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Department of Molecular Microbiology. Stanley also served as director of the National Institutes of Health-funded Midwest Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research. In 2006, he was named vice-chancellor for research at Washington University.[7]

President of Stony Brook UniversityEdit

On May 12, 2009, Stanley was named the fifth president of Stony Brook University, a position he formally assumed on July 1, 2009, making him the first physician to serve as Stony Brook University's president.[12]

Stanley's tenure at Stony Brook was marked by enhancing the faculty, boosting minority and low-income student enrollment, raising academic success rates, and increasing research funding and the university's endowment level.[13] Stony Brook University saw its largest donation in school and State University of New York history when mathematician Jim Simons gifted $150 million to the school.[14] In 2012, Stanley and his wife announced the establishment of the Ellen Li and Samuel S. Stanley Jr. Endowed Scholarship in the Stony Brook University School of Medicine.[15] He also associated the university with the United Nations HeForShe program and committed the university to addressing gender equity issues.[16]

Upon Stanley's arrival, Stoney Brook faced a $13 million budget deficit which grew to $21 million and led to a hiring freeze in December 2009 and closure of the 81-acre campus in Southampton in 2010.[17][18] Students brought suit to the university over the closure, resulting in a settlement which included a public apology by Stanley and an agreement to maintain an environmental degree program the students were enrolled in.[19] By 2017, Stony Brook's budget deficit grew to $35 million which led to development of a budget plan which included controversial cuts to the university's humanities funding.[20][21][22][23][24]

According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, Stanley's salary was $690,040 during the 2014–15 school year and ranked the 25th-highest amongst public university executives in the United States; from 2009 to 2012, the Stony Brook Foundation awarded Stanley $250,000 in addition to his base salary.[25]

In January 2015, Stanley began his term on the NCAA Division I board of directors.[26] On July 19, 2016, Stanley was appointed to the NCAA board of governors.[27] The board adopted a sexual violence policy in 2017 and in 2018 heard recommendations to tie athlete eligibility to behavior, but took no immediate action.[28] Stanley's term expired in 2018 and in 2020 the board expanded the NCAA's sexual violence policy to require student-athletes to annually disclose any investigations or disciplinary matters in their past.[29][30]

President of Michigan State UniversityEdit

Stanley was named president of Michigan State University on May 28, 2019, to succeed Lou Anna Simon, who resigned in the wake of the Larry Nassar scandal, with his tenure officially beginning on August 1.[31] On August 29, 2019, two Michigan State students were charged with false terrorism threats after posting a plan to assassinate Stanley on the Michigan State subreddit.[32]

The new president said early in his tenure that his top priority was to make Michigan State as safe, respectful and welcoming as it can be.[33] Meeting with and listening to members of the university community, including conversations with groups of sexual assault survivors, was a focus of his first months at MSU.[34] Feedback from those survivor sessions was also meant to help develop recommendations to improve the university's handling of sexual assault and formulate a comprehensive plan.[35] Late in 2019, Stanley announced two new institutional planning initiatives, one focused on issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion and the other a comprehensive university strategic planning process.[36][37] He also launched an initiative in late 2019 to investigate development of a campus multicultural center.[38]

Stanley restructured administration of the university's medical, osteopathic and nursing colleges and its clinical services in October 2019 to improve oversight and alignment of health care, education, and research activities.[39] The university broke ground Nov. 18, 2019 on a $19.5 million, gift-funded medical innovation facility next to MSU's $88.1 million Grand Rapids Research Center and close to its College of Human Medicine in downtown Grand Rapids.[40]

Biomedical researchEdit

Stanley was a biomedical researcher.[3] His research interest in immunity from infections led him to publish several articles about the characterization of key proteins and pathways involved in amebic, bacterial and viral infections, blood-borne pathogen risks in hemophilia therapy, and the identification of new strain- specific clones.[1][41] Better defense against infection was a key focus of his research.[7]

In 2008, he worked to create the Midwest Regional Center for Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research, with a $37 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.[7] The center was established with goals of improving biodefense, in reaction to the post-September 11 bioterrorism threat and anthrax attacks.[42] He has also served on the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, the NIH Blue Ribbon Panel on the New England Infectious Diseases Research Laboratory, the NIH National Advisory Allergy & Infectious Diseases Council and committees led by the United States Department of Commerce.[1]

Stanley is also the recipient of awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Scholar Award in Molecular Parasitology and the Distinguished Service Teaching Award from Washington University.[7] Stanley is currently the owner of 3 patents.[1] He also serves as an ambassador for the Paul G. Rogers Society for Global Health Research and has received an honorary doctorate degree in Science from Konkuk University in South Korea.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k http://www.stonybrook.edu/pres/cv.html=all About the President: Curriculum Vitae.
  2. ^ a b c d e http://www.stonybrook.edu/pres/bio.html= all Stony Brook University: Office of the President: Biography
  3. ^ a b c http://investing.businessweek.com/research/stocks/private/person.asp?personId=129279542&privcapId=6184496&previousCapId=6184496&previousTitle=State%20University%20of%20New%20York%20at%20Stony%20Brook=all Company Overview of State University of New York at Stony Brook- People.
  4. ^ "MSU names medical doctor, current Stony Brook University president as new president". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  5. ^ "President-designee Samuel L. Stanley Jr., M.D. | Presidential Search | Michigan State University". msu.edu. Retrieved May 31, 2019.
  6. ^ http://www.americaeast.com/ViewArticle.dbml?DB_OEM_ID=14000&ATCLID=3737095=all Samuel Stanley Selected New President at Stony Brook University
  7. ^ a b c d e http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/6557.aspx=all Vice-Chancellor of Research at Washington University
  8. ^ http://hms.harvard.edu/alumni-search?LastName=stanley&FirstName=samuel&GradYear=1980&id=DC0eXHkBaUdudBxhNUR6KDsNMB8jEAJjVSYAcyh-GwF1ZQAb= all HMS- Alumni
  9. ^ http://www.stonybrookphysicians.com/doctor/LI_MD_ELLEN_2884.asp= all Stony Brook Physicians- Ellen LI, M.D., PhD
  10. ^ http://www.healthgrades.com/physician/dr-samuel-stanley-xmtsj/education=all Dr. Samuel Stanley- Education
  11. ^ http://www.stonybrook.edu/pres/lady.html=all About the President: First Lady
  12. ^ "Stanley named president of SUNY Stony Brook | The Source | Washington University in St. Louis". The Source. May 6, 2009.
  13. ^ "Students call him 'Super Stanley': Michigan State's new president a soft-spoken leader who listens". MLive. Archived from the original on August 19, 2019. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  14. ^ Pérez-Peña, Richard (December 13, 2011). "Stony Brook University to Get $150 Million Gift". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  15. ^ "President Stanley, Dr. Li Pledge to Equal Class of 2019 Senior Class Legacy Gifts |". SBU News. November 13, 2018. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  16. ^ ""We Are HeForShe": Stony Brook University Commits to Take Action for Gender Equality". Stoney Brook University. Archived from the original on October 22, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  17. ^ "Dr. Samuel L. Stanley Jr.: Stony Brook University's Post-Recession President". The Statesman. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  18. ^ "Facing Cuts, Stony Brook Will Close Programs". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  19. ^ "SBU prez to apologize for campus closure". Newsday. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  20. ^ "SBU students protest potential liberal arts cuts". Newsday. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  21. ^ "SBU: Admissions suspended to close $1.5M gap". Newsday. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  22. ^ Willis, Adam (August 23, 2019). "Bureaucrats Put the Squeeze on College Newspapers". The Atlantic. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  23. ^ Liebson, Rebecca (December 4, 2017). "42 distinguished professors voice concerns about SBU administration". The Statesman. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  24. ^ "President Stanley's plan to address $35 million deficit draws ire of faculty". The Statesman. Archived from the original on October 24, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  25. ^ Kilgallen, Michaela (July 20, 2016). "Stanley among highest paid public university presidents". The Statesman. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  26. ^ "President Stanley Appointed to NCAA Division I Board of Directors |". SBU News. January 15, 2015. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  27. ^ "President Stanley Appointed to Highest Governance Body in NCAA |". SBU News. July 19, 2016. Retrieved March 26, 2020.
  28. ^ "Board adopts sexual violence policy". NCAA. Archived from the original on November 18, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  29. ^ "NCAA Board of Governors Policy on Campus Sexual Violence". NCAA. Archived from the original on September 21, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  30. ^ "NCAA adjusts sexual violence policy, requires disclosure". EPSN. Archived from the original on May 26, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  31. ^ Jesse, David. "MSU names medical doctor, current Stony Brook University president as new president". Detroit Free Press. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  32. ^ "MSU student charged with false terror threat to go to trial". The State News. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  33. ^ "Oct. 25, 2019 report to the MSU Board of Trustees". Michigan State University. Archived from the original on August 21, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  34. ^ "MSU President meets with sexual assault survivors". WLNS. Archived from the original on October 5, 2019. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  35. ^ "Relationship Violence and Sexual Misconduct Plan". Michigan State University. Archived from the original on August 21, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  36. ^ "Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Plan". Michigan State University. Archived from the original on October 22, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  37. ^ "MSU Strategic Plan". Michigan State University. Archived from the original on September 19, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  38. ^ "Plans for a new MSU multicultural center could come by December". Lansing State Journal. Retrieved December 6, 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  39. ^ "Three human health colleges align under new structure". Michigan State University. Archived from the original on December 2, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  40. ^ "MSU to leverage public-private partnership for new Grand Rapids facility". MiBiz. Archived from the original on May 9, 2020. Retrieved December 6, 2020.
  41. ^ https://www.researchgate.net/researcher/12788669_Samuel_Stanley=all ResearchGate Profile: Samuel S. Stanley
  42. ^ http://mrce.wustl.edu/index.php?page=about=all About the MRCE

External linksEdit