Sam Groth

(Redirected from Samuel Groth)

Samuel Groth OLY, MP[2] (born 19 October 1987) is an Australian politician and a former professional tennis player. Sitting as a member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, Groth represents the Liberal Party in the seat of Nepean. He is also the Shadow Minister for Youth and Shadow Minister for Tourism, Sport and Events since December 2022.

Sam Groth
Stakhovsky & Groth (19646610795) (cropped).jpg
Shadow Minister for Tourism, Sport and Events
Assumed office
8 December 2022
LeaderJohn Pesutto
Preceded byCindy McLeish
Shadow Minister for Youth
Assumed office
8 December 2022
LeaderJohn Pesutto
Preceded byPosition established[a]
Member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly for Nepean
Assumed office
26 November 2022
Preceded byChris Brayne
Personal details
Born
Samuel Groth

(1987-10-19) 19 October 1987 (age 35)[1]
Narrandera, New South Wales, Australia[1]
Political partyLiberal (since 2021)
Spouse(s)
(m. 2009⁠–⁠2011)

Brittany Boys
(m. 2018)
Children2
Residence(s)Blairgowrie, Victoria, Australia

Tennis career
Country (sports) Australia
Height1.94 m (6 ft 4 in)[1]
Turned pro2006
Retired2018
PlaysRight-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money$1,950,436
Singles
Career record38–62
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 53 (10 August 2015)
Grand Slam singles results
Australian Open3R (2015)
French Open1R (2015, 2016)
Wimbledon3R (2015)
US Open2R (2014, 2015)
Doubles
Career record69–59
Career titles2
Highest rankingNo. 24 (2 February 2015)
Grand Slam doubles results
Australian OpenQF (2017, 2018)
French OpenSF (2014)
Wimbledon3R (2016, 2017)
US Open3R (2016)
Grand Slam mixed doubles results
Australian OpenSF (2017)
Team competitions
Davis CupSF (2015, 2017)
Last updated on: 9 August 2021.

His highest ATP singles ranking was World No. 53, which he reached in August 2015. His career high in doubles was World No. 24, reached in February 2015. Groth's best singles result was a semi-final appearance at the 2014 Hall of Fame Tennis Championships. He hit the fastest serve on record at 263 km/h (163.4 mph) in 2012 at the ATP Challenger in Busan. Prior to his political career, he worked for the Nine Network's tennis broadcasts and as a host on Postcards.

Tennis careerEdit

 
Groth in 2010

JuniorsEdit

Groth and Andrew Kennaugh of Great Britain lost in the finals of the 2005 Wimbledon boys' doubles championship to Jesse Levine and Michael Shabaz 6–4, 6–1.[3]

2007–2013: Fastest serve on recordEdit

Groth beat Mark Philippoussis in a 2007 match; Philippoussis subsequently focused on the seniors tour. Groth qualified for the ATP event in Nottingham where he defeated Britain's Jamie Baker 7–6, 6–3 in the first round. He lost his second round match to seeded Gilles Simon 7–6(7–1), 4–6, 4–6.

At the 2009 Australian Open he set a record for the fastest serve by a male player (232 km/h). He lost in the qualification to Wimbledon 2009 to Jesse Levine 4–6, 7–6, 5–7.[4]

In 2012, in an ATP Challenger in Busan, Groth hit the fastest serve on record with a 163.4 mph (263 km/h) ace, but lost the match to Uladzimir Ignatik, 4–6, 3–6.[5]

In November 2013, he reached the final of the Champaign Challenger, eventually losing in 3 sets to Tennys Sandgren 6–3, 3–6, 6–7. However, by reaching the final there, and the semi final of Toyota Challenger the following week, his ranking improved to a career high of #173.

2014Edit

In 2014, Groth was awarded a wild card into the main draw at the Brisbane International, where he made the quarter finals. This is his first ATP World Tour quarter final appearance.

On 8 January, Groth was awarded a wild card into the 2014 Australian Open,[6] but lost in round one to 28th seed, Vasek Pospisil in straight sets.

In March, Groth qualified for Indian Wells Masters, but lost in round 1 to Mikhail Kukushkin, 4–7 in the third set tie-break.

On 17 March, Groth entered and won the Rimouski Challenger in Canada. This was his first Challenger tour title. Two weeks later, he made the final of the León Challenger, but lost to #1 seed, Rajeev Ram. This gave him a new career high ranking of 136.

At the 2014 French Open, Groth made it to the last round of qualifying, but lost to Simone Bolelli 4–6, 2–6. This was his best French Open result to date. He partnered Andrey Golubev in the Men's doubles, where they made it to the semi final. This increased his doubles ranking to a career high of #41. In June, Groth made the final of the 2014 Aegon Nottingham Challenge but lost to compatriot Nick Kyrgios 6–7(3–7), 6–7(7–9). Groth made his Wimbledon debut after winning his way through qualifying, but lost in round 1 to Alexandr Dolgopolov in three sets. In July. Groth entered the Hall of Fame Tennis Championships, where he reached his maiden ATP semi-final, defeating defending champion Nicolas Mahut in the quarter finals. This achievement saw him break into the top 100 rankings for the first time.[7]

In August, Groth won his first Grand Slam match, defeating Albert Ramos-Viñolas 6–3, 7–6(7–5), 6–3 in the 2014 US Open. In the second round, he was defeated by Roger Federer in straight sets 4–6, 4–6, 4–6.

2015: BreakthroughEdit

Groth started the 2015 season at the 2015 Brisbane International, where he was awarded a wild card into the main draw. He defeated defending champion Lleyton Hewitt in round one, and then Łukasz Kubot in the second round before losing to eventual finalist Milos Raonic in the quarter finals 6–7(5–7), 6–3, 6–7(2–7). At the Australian Open, Groth defeated Filip Krajinović in round one, Thanasi Kokkinakis in round two before losing to Bernard Tomic in round 3. This was his best grand slam performance to date. In February, Groth headed to North America and lost in round 2 of Memphis to eventual runner-up Kevin Anderson. Groth lost in round 1 of Delray, Acapulco, Indian Wells and Miami. He then played the 2015 U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships and defeated Víctor Estrella Burgos in the first round. He then played top seed Feliciano López in the second round but lost in straight sets.

Groth then played at the Santaizi Challenger as the 2nd seed. He cruised through to the final where he defeated Konstantin Kravchuk to win the title. His next tournament was the Busan Open where he was again the 2nd seed. He defeated compatriot Alex Bolt in the first round but then lost to Franco Skugor. At the 2015 French Open, Groth led 21st seed Pablo Cuevas by a set in round 1, before losing in 4 sets.

Groth started his grass court season at the Manchester Challenger where he reached the final and defeated compatriot Luke Saville to win the title. He then competed at the ATP 2015 Mercedes Cup where he defeated Sergiy Stakhovsky in the first round. He then scored his first top 20 win by defeating world number 12 Feliciano López to reach the quarter final. At Wimbledon, Groth defeated 31st seed Jack Sock in round 1, compatriot James Duckworth in round 2[8] and set up a round 3 match against Roger Federer. In this 3rd round match, he made the second fastest serve ever at the Wimbledon tournament (147 mph), and was the only player to take a set off of Federer until the final, losing to the 7-time champion 4–6, 4–6, 7–6(7–5), 2–6. Groth then represented Australia at the 2015 Davis Cup Quarterfinals. Australia was down 2–0 to Kazakhstan when Groth played the doubles rubber with Lleyton Hewitt. The pair won in straight sets to take the tie to 2–1. Groth then replaced Nick Kyrgios to play Mikhail Kukushkin where he defeated him in 4 sets to level the tie at 2–2. Hewitt then won the 5th rubber to ensure Australia a place in the Davis Cup semi-finals. Groth next contested the Bogota Open as the 6th seed where he defeated Guido Pella before losing to former world number 8 Radek Štěpánek in straight sets. He then played in Atlanta and defeated Frances Tiafoe in the first round. He then lost to eventual finalist and fifth seed Marcos Baghdatis in 3 sets. Groth then competed at the 2015 Citi Open and reached his first ATP500 Quarterfinal after defeating Thomaz Bellucci, 9th seeded Viktor Troicki and 7th seeded Feliciano López before losing to eventual champion Kei Nishikori. This was also the first time Groth defeated back to back top 20 players. Groth next played at the 2015 Winston-Salem Open and defeated Jared Donaldson before losing to eventual semi-finalist Steve Johnson. Groth then played at the 2015 US Open, defeating former world number 13 Alexandr Dolgopolov in round 1, but then losing to 26th seed Tommy Robredo in round 2. Groth also played the Men's Doubles with Lleyton Hewitt, losing in the 2nd round.

2016: Loss of formEdit

Groth commenced the 2016 season with a wild card into Brisbane International. He lost to Chung Hyeon in round one. He also lost in round one at the Sydney International to Federico Delbonis. At the Australian Open, Groth defeated Adrian Mannarino before losing to number 2 seed Andy Murray in the second round. Groth partnered Lleyton Hewitt in the men's double at the Australian Open. They made the third round. Groth then had a first round to Frances Tiafoe loss at a Dallas Challenger. Groth had another first round loss to Illya Marchenko at the Memphis Open. Groth lost in the first round to Noah Rubin in the Delray Beach International Tennis Championships. Groth also lost in the first round in Acapulco to Dmitry Tursunov. Groth played for Australia in Davis Cup World Group losing his singles match to John Isner in straight sets. He had a first round loss at the first Masters 1000 of the year at Indian Wells to Leonardo Mayer. Groth then defeated Victor Estrella Burgos at the Miami but he lost to Dominic Thiem in the second round. Groth played a number of Challenger tournaments across Asia with little success. At the 2016 French Open, Groth lost in round 1 to 9-time champion Rafael Nadal. At 2016 Wimbledon, Groth lost in round 1 to Kei Nishikori. Groth had a last minute call-up to represent Australia at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, but lost in the first round to Belgium’s David Goffin. Groth played across North America with limited success on the singles ATP World Tour, but won his second doubles title in Newport before returning to the Challenger Circuit, winning his 4th single title in Las Vegas. Groth ended 2016 with a ranking of 185.

2017Edit

Groth commenced the 2017 with a wild card into the 2017 Brisbane International, where he defeated Pierre-Hugues Herbert before losing to Dominic Thiem in round 2. Groth reached the quarter final of the 2017 Canberra Challenger, losing to eventual champion Dudi Sela. Groth lost in round 1 of the 2017 Australian Open to Steve Darcis, but paired with Chris Guccione to reach the quarter final of the doubles, losing to eventual champions Henri Kontinen and John Peers. In February, Groth was selected to play in round 1 the 2017 Davis Cup against Czech Republic, he paired with John Peers to win the doubles taking Australia to an unbeatable 3–0. Groth went to North America but lost in qualifying for Indian Wells Masters and Drummondville Challenger singles but won the doubles at Drummondville. In June, Groth made the semi final of Ilkley Trophy.

2018: RetirementEdit

2018 Australian Open turned out to be Groth's last tournament before retirement. He lost in singles qualifying to Taylor Fritz. He paired with former world no. 1 compatriot Lleyton Hewitt in doubles and reached the quarterfinals. He paired with compatriot Samantha Stosur in mixed doubles.[9]

ATP career finalsEdit

Doubles: 5 (2 titles, 3 runner-ups)Edit

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–1)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (2–2)
Titles by surface
Hard (1–3)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (1–0)
Titles by setting
Outdoor (2–2)
Indoor (0–1)
Result W–L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1–0 Jul 2014 Colombia Open, Colombia 250 Series Hard   Chris Guccione   Nicolás Barrientos
  Juan Sebastián Cabal
7–6(7–5), 6–7(3–7), [11–9]
Loss 1–1 Aug 2014 Washington Open, United States 500 Series Hard   Leander Paes   Jean-Julien Rojer
  Horia Tecău
5–7, 4–6
Loss 1–2 Sep 2014 Shenzhen Open, China 250 Series Hard   Chris Guccione   Jean-Julien Rojer
  Horia Tecău
4–6, 6–7(4–7)
Loss 1–3 Oct 2014 Kremlin Cup, Russia 250 Series Hard (i)   Chris Guccione   František Čermák
  Jiří Veselý
6–7(2–7), 5–7
Win 2–3 Jul 2016 Hall of Fame Tennis Championships, United States 250 Series Grass   Chris Guccione   Jonathan Marray
  Adil Shamasdin
6–4, 6–3

ATP Challenger and ITF Futures finalsEdit

Singles: 22 (11–11)Edit

Legend
ATP Challenger (4–6)
ITF Futures (7–5)
Finals by surface
Hard (7–8)
Clay (1–1)
Grass (2–2)
Carpet (1–0)
Result W–L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Loss 0–1 Oct 2006 Australia F12, Mildura Futures Grass   Alun Jones 6–3, 5–7, 4–6
Loss 0–2 Oct 2007 Australia F7, Gloucester Futures Clay   Miles Armstrong 7–6(8–6), 1–6, 3–6
Win 1–2 Apr 2009 USA F7, Mobile Futures Hard   Jesse Witten 6–2, 3–0 ret.
Loss 1–3 May 2009 Fergana, Uzbekistan Challenger Hard   Lukas Lacko 6–4, 5–7, 6–7(4–7)
Win 2–3 Oct 2010 Turkey F9, Antalya Futures Hard   Radu Albot 6–3, 6–1
Win 3–3 Oct 2010 Turkey F10, Antalya Futures Hard   Artem Smirnov 6–4, 6–2
Loss 3–4 Nov 2010 Australia F12, Traralgon Futures Hard   Amir Weintraub 2–6, 4–6
Win 4–4 Dec 2010 Australia F13, Bendigo Futures Hard   Benjamin Mitchell 7–6(9–7), 6–4
Loss 4–5 Feb 2012 Burnie, Australia Challenger Hard   Danai Udomchoke 6–7(5–7), 3–6
Win 5–5 Mar 2012 Australia F3, Ipswich Futures Clay   Jason Kubler 5–7, 6–3, 6–2
Win 6–5 May 2012 Korea F1, Daegu Futures Hard   Frederik Nielsen 6–7(4–7), 6–4, 6–1
Loss 6–6 May 2012 Korea F2, Changwon Futures Hard   Michal Przysiezny 6–3, 5–7, 3–6
Loss 6–7 Sep 2012 Australia F6, Alice Springs Futures Hard   Matthew Barton 6–7(3–7), 3–6
Win 7–7 Feb 2013 Australia F2, Mildura Futures Grass   Matthew Barton 6–1, 6–4
Loss 7–8 Nov 2013 Champaign-Urbana, United States Challenger Hard   Tennys Sandgren 6–3, 3–6, 6–7(4–7)
Win 8–8 Mar 2014 Rimouski, Canada Challenger Hard   Ante Pavic 7–6(7–3), 6–2
Loss 8–9 Apr 2014 Leon, Mexico Challenger Hard   Rajeev Ram 2–6, 2–6
Loss 8–10 Jun 2014 Nottingham, United Kingdom Challenger Grass   Nick Kyrgios 6–7(3–7), 6–7(7–9)
Loss 8–11 Nov 2014 Knoxville, United States Challenger Hard   Adrian Mannarino 6–3, 6–7(6–8), 4–6
Win 9–11 May 2015 Taipei, Taiwan Challenger Carpet   Konstantin Kravchuk 6–7(5–7), 6–4, 7–6(7–3)
Win 10–11 Jun 2015 Manchester, United Kingdom Challenger Grass   Luke Saville 7–5, 6–1
Win 11–11 Oct 2016 Las Vegas, United States Challenger Hard   Santiago Giraldo 6–7(4–7), 6–4, 7–5

Doubles: 40 (30–10)Edit

Legend
ATP Challenger (19–5)
ITF Futures (11–5)
Finals by surface
Hard (21–8)
Clay (2–1)
Grass (5–1)
Carpet (2–0)
Result W–L    Date    Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Win 1–0 Nov 2005 Australia F11, Barmera Futures Grass   Joseph Sirianni   Callum Beale
  Joel Kerley
6–2, 5–7, [10–4]
Loss 1–1 Jul 2006 Great Britain F10, Frinton-on-Sea Futures Grass   Andrew Coelho   Andrew Kennaugh
  Tom Rushby
5–7, 7–6(7–3), 4–6
Loss 1–2 Sep 2006 France F12, Bagneres de Bigorre Futures Hard   Paul Baccanello   Thomas Oger
  Nicolas Tourte
6–2, 3–6, 4–6
Loss 1–3 Mar 2007 Great Britain F6, Sunderland Futures Hard   Andrew Coelho   Jamie Baker
  Aisam Qureshi
3–6, 6–3, 3–6
Win 2–3 May 2007 Algeria F3, Algiers Futures Clay   Edward Seator   Matus Horecny
  Martin Hromec
6–3, 3–6, 6–1
Win 3–3 Jun 2007 Spain F21, Puerto Cruz Futures Carpet   Andrew Coelho   Agustin Boje-Ordonez
  Pablo Martin-Adalia
6–4, 7–6(7–5)
Win 4–3 Sep 2007 France F12, Bagneres de Bigorre Futures Hard   Andrew Coelho   Daniel King-Turner
  Pierrick Ysern
6–4, 4–6, [10–6]
Win 5–3 Oct 2007 Australia F7, Gloucester Futures Clay   Joseph Sirianni   Kaden Hensel
  Adam Hubble
6–4, 6–3
Win 6–3 Dec 2007 Burnie, Australia Challenger Hard   Joseph Sirianni   Nima Roshan
  Jose Statham
6–3, 1–6, [10–4]
Win 7–3 Feb 2008 Australia F1, Mildura Futures Grass   Nathan Healey   Andrew Coelho
  Brydan Klein
6–3, 6–4
Win 8–3 Mar 2008 Australia F3, Perth Futures Hard   Adam Feeney   Matthew Ebden
  Miles Armstrong
5–7, 6–4, [10–7]
Win 9–3 May 2008 New Delhi, India Challenger Hard   Colin Ebelthite   Mohammad Ghareeb
  Illya Marchenko
2–6, 7–6(7–5), [10–8]
Win 10–3 Aug 2009 Campos do Jordao, Brazil Challenger Hard   Josh Goodall   Rogerio Dutra Silva
  Julio Silva
7–6(7–4), 6–3
Win 11–3 Feb 2010 Burnie, Australia Challenger Hard   Matthew Ebden   James Lemke
  Dane Propoggia
6–7(8–10), 7–6(7–4), [10–8]
Win 12–3 Feb 2010 Australia F1, Mildura Futures Grass   Matthew Ebden   Adam Hubble
  Sadik Kadir
6–3, 4–6, [10–4]
Win 13–3 Feb 2010 Australia F2, Berri Futures Grass   Matthew Ebden   Huang Liang-Chi
  Lee Hsin-Han
6–3, 7–6(9–7)
Loss 13–4 Nov 2010 Australia F12, Traralgon Futures Hard   Sebastian Rieschick   Colin Ebelthite
  Adam Feeney
3–6, 6–4, [13–15]
Win 14–4 Feb 2011 Caloundra, Australia Challenger Hard   Matthew Ebden   Pavol Cervenak
  Ivo Klec
6–3, 3–6, [10–1]
Loss 14–5 Mar 2012 Pingguo, China Challenger Hard   Colin Ebelthite   John-Paul Fruttero
  Raven Klaasen
2–6, 4–6
Win 15–5 May 2012 Korea F1, Daegu Futures Hard   Adam Hubble   Hong Chung
  Suk-Young Jeong
6–1, 6–4
Loss 15–6 Jul 2012 Wuhan, China Challenger Hard   Adam Feeney   Sonchat Ratiwatana
  Sanchai Ratiwatana
4–6, 6–2, [8–10]
Loss 15–7 Sep 2012 Australia F6, Alice Springs Futures Hard   Michael Venus   Adam Feeney
  Nick Lindahl
6–4, 2–6, [8–10]
Win 16–7 Jan 2013 Noumea, New Caledonia Challenger Hard   Toshihide Matsui   Artem Sitak
  Jose Statham
7–6(8–6), 1–6, [10–4]
Win 17–7 Feb 2013 West Lakes, Australia Challenger Hard   Matt Reid   James Duckworth
  Greg Jones
6–2, 6–4
Win 18–7 Feb 2013 Australia F2, Mildura Futures Grass   John-Patrick Smith   Colin Ebelthite
  Ruan Roelofse
6–3, 6–4
Win 19–7 Mar 2013 Rimouski, Canada Challenger Hard   John-Patrick Smith   Philipp Marx
  Florin Mergea
7–6(7–5), 7–6(9–7)
Loss 19–8 Apr 2013 Guadalajara, Mexico Challenger Hard   John-Patrick Smith   Marin Draganja
  Mate Pavic
7–5, 2–6, [11–13]
Loss 19–9 May 2013 Anning, China Challenger Clay   John-Patrick Smith   Victor Baluda
  Dino Marcan
7–6(7–5), 4–6, [7–10]
Win 20–9 May 2013 Kunming, China Challenger Hard   John-Patrick Smith   Yasutaka Uchiyama
  Go Soeda
6–4, 6–1
Win 21–9 Nov 2013 Knoxville, United States Challenger Hard   John-Patrick Smith   Carsten Ball
  Peter Polansky
6–7(6–8), 6–2, [10–7]
Win 22–9 Feb 2014 Dallas, United States Challenger Hard   Chris Guccione   Ryan Harrison
  Mark Knowles
6–4, 6–2
Win 23–9 Apr 2014 Leon, Mexico Challenger Hard   Chris Guccione   Marcus Daniell
  Artem Sitak
6–3, 6–4
Win 24–9 Apr 2014 Shenzhen, China Challenger Hard   Chris Guccione   Dominik Meffert
  Tim Pütz
6–3, 7–6(7–5)
Win 25–9 May 2014 Taipei, Taiwan Challenger Carpet   Chris Guccione   Austin Krajicek
  John-Patrick Smith
6–4, 5–7, [10–8]
Win 26–9 May 2014 Gimcheon, South Korea Challenger Hard   Chris Guccione   Austin Krajicek
  John-Patrick Smith
6–7(5–7), 5–7, [10–4]
Loss 26–10 Apr 2016 Leon, Mexico Challenger Hard   Leander Paes   Santiago Gonzalez
  Mate Pavic
4–6, 6–3, [11–13]
Win 27–10 May 2016 Busan, South Korea Challenger Hard   Leander Paes   Sonchat Ratiwatana
  Sanchai Ratiwatana
4–6, 6–1, [10–7]
Win 28–10 Oct 2016 Stockton, United States Challenger Hard   Brian Baker   Matt Reid
  John-Patrick Smith
6–2, 4–6, [10–2]
Win 29–10 Nov 2016 Charlottesville, United States Challenger Hard   Brian Baker   Brydan Klein
  Ruan Roelofse
6–3, 6–3
Win 30–10 Mar 2017 Drummondville, Canada Challenger Hard   Adil Shamasdin   Matt Reid
  John-Patrick Smith
6–2, 2–6, [10–8]

Junior Grand Slam finalsEdit

Doubles: 1 (1 runner-up)Edit

Result Year Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 2005 Wimbledon Grass   Andrew Kennaugh   Jesse Levine
  Michael Shabaz
4–6, 1–6

Performance timelinesEdit

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# P# DNQ A Z# PO G S B NMS NTI P NH
(W) winner; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (P#) preliminary round; (DNQ) did not qualify; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (S) silver or (B) bronze Olympic/Paralympic medal; (NMS) not a Masters tournament; (NTI) not a Tier I tournament; (P) postponed; (NH) not held; (SR) strike rate (events won / competed); (W–L) win–loss record.
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

SinglesEdit

Tournament 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 SR W–L Win %
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A A Q2 1R Q1 Q1 A Q1 1R 3R 2R 1R Q1 0 / 5 3–5 38%
French Open A A A A A A A Q1 Q3 1R 1R Q1 A 0 / 2 0–2 0%
Wimbledon A A A Q1 A A A Q2 1R 3R 1R Q1 A 0 / 3 2–3 0%
US Open A A Q2 Q1 A A A Q1 2R 2R Q1 Q1 A 0 / 2 2–2 50%
Win–loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–3 5–4 1–3 0–1 0–0 0 / 12 7–12 37%
National representation
Summer Olympics NH A Not Held A Not Held 1R NH 0 / 1 0–1 0%
Davis Cup A A A A A A A A PO SF 1R SF A 0 / 2 2–4 33%
ATP World Tour Masters 1000
Indian Wells A A A A A Q1 A A 1R 1R 1R Q1 A 0 / 3 0–3 0%
Miami A A A A A A A A A 1R 2R A A 0 / 2 1–2 33%
Canada Masters A A A A A A A A A A Q1 A A 0 / 0 0–0  – 
Shanghai Masters Not Held A A A A A 1R A A A A 0 / 1 0–1 0%
Win–loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–2 0–2 1–2 0–0 0–0 0 / 6 1–6 14%
Career statistics
Titles / Finals 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0
Overall win–loss 0–0 0–0 1–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–3 10–13 19–22 4–16 2–5 0–0 0 / 62 38–62 38%
Year-end ranking 681 341 265 270 293 575 211 183 81 60 181 248 Prize Money $1,950,436

DoublesEdit

Tournament 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 SR W–L
Grand Slam tournaments
Australian Open A A 1R 1R 1R 2R A 2R 1R 3R 3R QF QF 0 / 10 12–10
French Open A A A A A A A A SF 1R 1R 3R A 0 / 4 6–4
Wimbledon A A A A A A A 2R 1R 1R 3R 3R A 0 / 5 5–5
US Open A A A A A A A A 2R 2R 3R 1R A 0 / 4 4–4
Win–loss 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–1 1–1 0–0 2–2 5–4 3–4 6–4 7–4 3–1 0 / 23 27–23
National representation
Summer Olympics NH A Not Held A Not Held A NH 0 / 0 0–0
Davis Cup A A A A A A A A PO SF 1R SF A 0 / 2 3–3
Win–loss 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–2 1–0 1–1 0–0 0 / 2 3–3
Career statistics
Titles / Finals 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 1 / 4 0 / 0 1 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 2 / 5
Overall win–loss 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–1 2–2 0–0 4–3 24–13 8–20 15–9 13–8 3–1 69–59
Year-end ranking 438 296 287 400 223 204 308 79 31 131 49 80 54%

Political careerEdit

Electoral performance (Pre-selection)
Year(s) Electorate Candidates Votes
2022[b] Nepean   Sam Groth 74
  David Burgess 33
Elizabeth Miller 4

On 22 February 2022, Groth, a member of the Liberal Party since 2021,[10] won pre-selection for the Liberal Party in the marginal Labor-held electorate of Nepean,[11] the electorate in which Groth resides.[12] This would allow Groth to contest the electorate for the party in the upcoming Victorian election (November 2022). Groth had told Sky News Australia he was frustrated with the COVID-related lockdowns in Victoria.[13] Groth won the three-candidate contest with seventy-four votes (67%), compared with runner-up David Burgess' thirty-three, and former Bentleigh MP Elizabeth Miller with four.[11] He had the backing of former Victorian Premier Jeff Kennett, Federal Treasurer at the time, Josh Frydenberg, state MP for Brighton James Newbury and former Nepean MP Martin Dixon.[10]

2022 Victorian electionEdit

Electoral term
Years Electorate Term
2022–2026 Nepean   60th

Contesting a former safe Liberal seat, and one of the most marginal Labor-held seats at the previous election (2018), Groth stood a good chance of regaining the seat for the party. Speaking before the election, Groth stated of his possibility to win the seat: “It's been extremely positive. I'm confident, if we are to have any chance tonight of the Liberal Party and the Coalition getting into government in this state, Nepean is the one that has to turn.”[14]

Groth claimed victory of Nepean the night of the election.[14][15] After the election, Groth was appointed as Shadow Minister for Youth and Shadow Minister for Tourism, Sport and Events in the Pesutto shadow ministry.[16]

Personal lifeEdit

Groth was born in Narrandera, New South Wales, and grew up in the Riverina area of southern New South Wales. Groth is an avid supporter of the Sydney Swans in the Australian Football League.[1] He was also a member of Vermont Football Club reserve squad during a hiatus from tennis in 2011.[17]

In January 2019 Groth received the OLY post-nominal title at the Brisbane International tournament.[18]

Between 2009 and 2011, Groth was married to fellow Australian tennis player Jarmila Wolfe.

Groth married long-time partner Brittany Boys in 2018. Boys, a Melburnian, was an amateur women's tennis player and competed at the university level for the University of Richmond in the United States.[19] Groth and Boys have two young children, twins Mason and Parker, born in April 2021.[20][21] Groth lives with his family in Blairgowrie, Victoria.[22][23]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Matthew Bach in the previous shadow cabinet held the position of: “Shadow Minister for Youth Affairs”.
  2. ^ To determine the Liberal candidate that will run for the seat.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Sam Groth". tennis.com.au. Tennis Australia. Retrieved 30 May 2015.
  2. ^ "Tennis stars honoured with OLY". World Olympians Association. 1 January 2019.
  3. ^ "University of Miami Online High School Student Wins Junior Doubles at Wimbledon," ereleases.com, 12 July 2005, Retrieved 15 July 2009
  4. ^ "USTA: Find a Tennis Tournament & Play Tennis Near You".
  5. ^ "Aussie smashes tennis serve speed record". The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 May 2012. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  6. ^ "Eight Aussie wildcards announced for Australian Open". ABC News. 7 January 2014.
  7. ^ "GROTH UPSETS DEFENDING CHAMPION IN NEWPORT, MEETS KARLOVIC IN SFS". ATP World Tour. 10 July 2014. Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  8. ^ "Wimbledon: Sam Groth beats James Duckworth, Casey Dellacqua beats Elina Svitolina". ABC News. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 3 July 2015. Retrieved 3 July 2015.
  9. ^ Schlink, Leo (10 January 2018). "Sam Groth plays his last singles match in loss to Taylor Fritz in Australian Open qualifying". News.com.au — Australia's Leading News Site. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  10. ^ a b Brook, Stephen; Hutchinson, Samantha (22 February 2022). "Sam Groth hopes to ace Nepean preselection". The Age.
  11. ^ a b Sakkal, Paul (22 February 2022). "Tennis player turned commentator Sam Groth wins Liberal candidacy". The Age.
  12. ^ Sakkal, Paul; Morgan, Cassandra (14 December 2021). "Tennis player Sam Groth weighs up running as Liberal in state election". The Age.
  13. ^ "Former tennis star wins Liberal preselection". Sky News Australia. 23 February 2022.
  14. ^ a b Sciberras, Allanah (26 November 2022). "Former tennis star Sam Groth wins Nepean in Victoria election". Nine News. Retrieved 27 November 2022.
  15. ^ "Sky News Australia calls a Liberal gain for Nepean". Sky News Australia. 26 November 2022. Retrieved 27 November 2022.
  16. ^ "A renewed Liberals and Nationals team putting Victorians first". Liberal Victoria. 19 December 2022. Retrieved 27 December 2022.
  17. ^ "Solid Groth's back on the ball". 21 May 2013.
  18. ^ "ITF Tennis - ABOUT - Articles - Tennis stars honoured with OLY in Brisbane". www.itftennis.com. Archived from the original on 6 January 2019.
  19. ^ "2016–17 Women's Tennis Roster". richmondspiders.com. University of Richmond.
  20. ^ Scott, Jonathan (18 April 2021). "Sam and Brittany Groth Welcome Twin Boys". tennis.com.
  21. ^ "Sam and Brittany Groth welcomed their twin boys on Saturday". The Herald Sun. 11 April 2021.
  22. ^ Sam Groth [@SamGrothTennis] (1 February 2022). "Sam Groth – State Seat of Nepean" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  23. ^ Hales, Holly (15 December 2021). "Former Aussie tennis star Sam Groth weighs up shock career switch". news.com.au. Retrieved 6 November 2022.

External linksEdit

Parliament of Victoria
Preceded by Member for Nepean
2022–present
Incumbent
Records
Preceded by Fastest serve world record holder
12 May 2012 – present
Succeeded by
Incumbent