Salih ibn Ali

Salih ibn Ali ibn Abdallah ibn al-Abbas (Arabic: صالح بن علي بن عبدالله بن العباس‎) (711–769 CE) was a member of the Banu Abbas who served as general and governor in Syria and Egypt.

Abu al-Fadl

Salih ibn Ali
صالح بن علي
Abbasid Governor of Egypt
In office
750–751
Monarchal-Saffah
Preceded byAbd al-Malik ibn Marwan ibn Musa ibn Nusayr
(Umayyad governor)
Succeeded byAbu Awn Abd al-Malik ibn Yazid
Abbasid Governor of Egypt
In office
753–755
Monarchal-Saffah,
al-Mansur
Preceded byAbu Awn Abd al-Malik ibn Yazid
Succeeded byAbu Awn Abd al-Malīk ibn Yazīd
Abbasid Governor of al-Sham (Syria)
In office
754 – 754
(Less than a year)
Monarchal-Saffah,
al-Mansur
Preceded byAbdallah ibn Ali al-Hashimi
Succeeded byAbd al-Wahhab ibn Ibrahim ibn Muhammad al-Abbasi (754–764)
Personal details
Born711 CE
Umayyad Caliphate
Died769 CE
al-Sham, Abbasid Caliphate
Cause of deathillness
RelationsAbbasid dynasty
ChildrenAl-Fadl ibn Salih,
Ibrahim ibn Salih,
Isma'il ibn Salih,
Abd al-Malik ibn Salih
FatherAli ibn Abdallah ibn al-Abbas al-Hashimi
RelativesAbdallah ibn Ali (brother)
Military career
AllegianceAbbasid Caliphate
Service/branchAbbasid Army
RankGeneral
Battles/warsArab–Byzantine wars

LifeEdit

Salih and his brother Abdallah were among the van of the Abbasid forces which overthrew the Umayyads in 750. The brothers besieged and took the Caliphate's capital, Damascus, and then pursued the last Umayyad caliph, Marwan II, to Egypt where he was captured and killed.[1][2]

Salih was named as the first Abbasid governor of Egypt on 9 August 750. He kept the post for less than a year, being named governor of the Jund Filastin (Palestine) in March 751. In this capacity, he sent Sa'id ibn Abdallah in the first raiding expedition of the Abbasid era against Byzantine Anatolia.[1] On 8 October 753 he was appointed again as governor of Egypt, a post he held until 21 February 755.[1] At the death of the Caliph al-Saffah, Salih's nephew, in 754, Salih's brother Abdallah launched a revolt in Syria against the new Caliph al-Mansur, claiming to have been named by the dying Saffah as his successor. Salih refused to join his brother's revolt and even led troops into Syria to help suppress it. He clashed with and defeated Abdallah's governor of Palestine, al-Hakam ibn Da'ban, while Abdallah was defeated by Abu Muslim and forced to submit to Mansur.[3]

Despite Abdallah's rebellion, Salih and his family were established as the paramount Abbasid potentates in Syria, a position they held for the next half-century, as Salih's sons al-Fadl, Ibrahim and Abd al-Malik all held governorships in Syria and Egypt.[1][4] Salih also appropriated most of the Umayyad dynasty's extensive properties in the area for himself. In addition, he played an important role in the strengthening of the Abbasid-Byzantine frontier, the thughur, re-occupying and rebuilding the former Byzantine cities of Melitene (Malatya), Germanikeia (Mar'ash) and Mopsuestia (al-Massisa). He died in Syria in 769.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Grohmann & Kennedy (1995), p. 985
  2. ^ Cobb (2001), p. 27
  3. ^ Cobb (2001), pp. 23–27
  4. ^ Cobb (2001), pp. 27–28

SourcesEdit

  • Cobb, Paul M. (2001). White banners: contention in ‘Abbāsid Syria, 750–880. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. ISBN 0-7914-4880-0.
  • Grohmann, Adolph & Kennedy, Hugh (1995). "Ṣāliḥ b. ʿAlī". In Bosworth, C. E.; van Donzel, E.; Heinrichs, W. P. & Lecomte, G. (eds.). The Encyclopaedia of Islam, New Edition, Volume VIII: Ned–Sam. Leiden: E. J. Brill. p. 985. ISBN 978-90-04-09834-3.
Preceded by
Abu Awn Abd al-Malik ibn Yazid
Governor of Egypt
753–755
Succeeded by
Abu Awn Abd al-Malik ibn Yazid
Preceded by
Abd al-Malik ibn Marwan
(as Umayyad Governor)
Governor of Egypt
750–751
Succeeded by
Abu Awn Abd al-Malik ibn Yazid