Salem Red Sox

The Salem Red Sox are a Minor League Baseball affiliate of the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB), based in Salem, an independent city adjacent to Roanoke, Virginia.[a] The team competes at the Low-A level in the Low-A East league. Home games are played at Haley Toyota Field at Salem Memorial Ballpark, a 6,300-seat facility opened in 1995.

Salem Red Sox
Founded in 1955
Salem, Virginia
Salem Sox.PNG Salem Sox cap.PNG
Team logo Cap insignia
Minor league affiliations
ClassLow-A (2021–present)
Previous classes
  • Class A-Advanced (1990–2020)
  • Class A (1968–1989)
  • Rookie (1963–1967)
  • Class D (1955, 1957–1962)
LeagueLow-A East (2021–present)
DivisionNorth Division
Previous leagues
Carolina League (1968–2020)
Appalachian League (1955, 1957–1967)
Major league affiliations
TeamBoston Red Sox (2009–present)
Previous teams
Minor league titles
League titles (7)
  • 1955
  • 1965
  • 1972
  • 1974
  • 1987
  • 2001
  • 2013
Division titles (13)
  • 1968
  • 1969
  • 1972
  • 1974
  • 1981
  • 1987
  • 1988
  • 2006
  • 2009
  • 2013
  • 2016
  • 2019
  • 2021
Team data
NameSalem Red Sox (2009–present)
Previous names
  • Salem Avalanche (1995–2008)
  • Salem Buccaneers (1987–1994)
  • Salem Redbirds (1981–1986)
  • Salem Pirates (1972–1980)
  • Salem Rebels (1955, 1957–1971)
MascotMuggsy (1997–present)
Misty (2004–present)
Big Mo (2005–2008)
The Baseball Nut (1995–1996)
Long Ball Silver (1987–1994)
BallparkSalem Memorial Ballpark (1995–present)
Previous parks
Kiwanis Field (1955, 1957–1994)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Fenway Sports Group
General ManagerAllen Lawrence
ManagerLuke Montz
Exterior of Salem Memorial Ballpark in 2017

The team first played in 1955, and then from 1957 to 1967, in the Appalachian League, initially at the now-defunct Class D level and then at the Rookie level starting in 1963. From 1968 through 2020, the team competed in the Carolina League, initially Class A and then Class A-Advanced starting in 1990.

Prior to adopting the Red Sox name in 2009, the team was known as the Salem Avalanche from 1995 through 2008, when it was affiliated with the Colorado Rockies (1995–2002) and Houston Astros (2003–2008). Prior to 1995, the franchise played under several other names and affiliations.

HistoryEdit

The franchise debuted in 1955 and was initially known as the Salem Rebels, an affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates.

The franchise was owned from 1986 until 2006 by Kelvin Bowles, a cable television executive and scout in Major League Baseball. Bowles, who scouted for the Boston Red Sox from 2002 to 2005, bought the team when it was in danger of moving from Salem. In 2006, the team was sold to a pair of businessmen from Atlanta who also owned the Fort Wayne Wizards. In December 2007, this group sold the team to Fenway Sports Group, a subsidiary of the Boston Red Sox ownership group, preparing the team for an affiliation change after its Player Development Contract with the Houston Astros ended in 2008. As such, the Salem Red Sox are owned by the same parent company that manages Liverpool F.C. and the Boston Red Sox.

In 2006, Salem Memorial Ballpark hosted the All Star Game between the Carolina League and California League.

Since switching affiliation to Boston in 2009, the team has claimed four division titles (2009, 2013, 2016, 2019), has made five playoff appearances (each division title season, plus 2014 as a wild card), and has won one league championship (2013). League and divisional titles are commemorated on the press box and sky boxes overlooking the Haley Toyota Field Grandstand.

In conjunction with Major League Baseball's restructuring of Minor League Baseball in 2021, the team moved from being the Red Sox' Class A-Advanced affiliate to being their Low-A affiliate, and became a member of the Low-A East league; in a corresponding move, the Greenville Drive moved from Class A to High-A.[2][3] At the time of the restructuring, the website Ballpark Digest speculated that the Red Sox could look to move the Salem franchise to Lowell, Massachusetts in time for the 2022 season.[4] In May 2021, Rick White, president of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball, announced that Salem, along with Staten Island, New York, was "on board for 2022" as an expansion franchise location, further fueling speculation that Salem would lose their affiliation status to Lowell.[5][6]

Location and rivalry gamesEdit

While the team is located in a relatively small city (population circa 25,000) when compared to other teams of its classification, the Red Sox are strongly identified with the Roanoke Valley as a whole, drawing fans from neighboring cities and counties within the roughly 300,000-person metropolitan area. The connection with neighboring Roanoke was emphasized during the 2017 Carolina League All-Star Classic, hosted by Salem, that was represented by a logo featuring the iconic Mill Mountain Star. Salem is also located in the Blue Ridge Mountains, which are featured prominently on the team's logo and are clearly visible over Haley Toyota Field's outfield walls. This mountain view includes the aforementioned star, visible on clear nights over the left field wall.

Haley Toyota Field at Salem Memorial Ballpark is located roughly 2 miles (3.2 km) from downtown Salem and is part of the James E. Taliaferro Sports and Entertainment Complex, which also includes the Salem Civic Center and Salem Football Stadium (former location of the annual Stagg Bowl). The Red Sox share their stadium with the NCAA Division III Roanoke Maroons and have previously hosted the "Hokie-Smokey Classic" baseball series between the Tennessee Volunteers and the nearby Virginia Tech Hokies.

Given the teams' close proximity, their long-time histories in the league, and both competing in the Carolina League's North Division, Salem's chief rival is the Lynchburg Hillcats. The regular matchups of these teams, known as the "460 Series", named for U.S. Route 460 which connects the cities, has occasionally feature day/night doubleheaders during which two games will be split between the two cities over the course of the same day.

Season-by-season recordsEdit

Note that while records in the below table are for entire seasons, the Carolina League played a split-season schedule starting in 1970. Thus, a team may have earned a division title by finishing first in either half of the season, despite not having the best overall record for the entire season. Alternately, a team may have had the best overall record for the entire season, but did not finish first in either half of the season, thus did not earn a division title.

Season Nickname Affiliation Record (win %) Finish Manager Playoffs (games) Attendance Ref.
1955 Rebels Pittsburgh 84–38 (.689) 1st of 8 Jack Crosswhite defeated Kingsport Cherokees (2–0)
no contest vs. Johnson City Cardinals[b]
31,213 [9]
1956 no team
1957 Rebels Pittsburgh 38–30 (.559) 3rd of 6 Lamar Dorton none held 18,007 [10]
1958 Rebels Pittsburgh 42–29 (.592) 3rd of 6 Lamar Dorton none held 21,351 [11]
1959 Rebels Pittsburgh 38–29 (.567) 2nd of 6 Lamar Dorton none held 36,128 [12]
1960 Rebels San Francisco 28–39 (.418) 6th of 6 Jodie Phipps none held 38,929 [13]
1961 Rebels San Francisco 31–35 (.470) 7th of 8 Jodie Phipps none held 34,125 [14]
1962 Rebels San Francisco 31–39 (.443) 5th of 6 Alex Cosmidis none held 40,913 [15]
1963 Rebels San Francisco 36–34 (.514) 2nd of 6 Alex Cosmidis none held 34,061 [16]
1964 Rebels Pittsburgh 30–41 (.423) 3rd of 4 George Detore none held 36,184 [17][8]: 527 
1965 Rebels Pittsburgh 43–27 (.614) 1st of 6 George Detore (champions, no playoff) 44,254 [18][19]
1966 Rebels Pittsburgh 25–43 (.368) 5th of 5 George Detore none held 34,884 [20][8]: 535 
1967 Rebels Pittsburgh 28–38 (.424) 5th of 6 Bob Pritchard none held 34,822 [21][8]: 539 
1968 Rebels Pittsburgh 85–55 (.607) 1st of 6 (West) Don Hoak lost to Lynchburg White Sox (0–1) 64,532 [22]
1969 Rebels Pittsburgh 78–66 (.542) 1st of 5 (West) Chuck Hiller defeated High Point-Thomasville Royals (2–0)
lost to Burlington Senators (0–2)
63,248 [23]
1970 Rebels Pittsburgh 60–80 (.429) 7th of 8 Billy Klaus did not qualify 50,076 [24]
1971 Rebels Pittsburgh 65–71 (.478) 6th of 8 Tim Murtaugh did not qualify 37,872 [25]
1972 Pirates Pittsburgh 79–58 (.577) 1st of 6[c] Tim Murtaugh defeated Burlington Rangers (2–1) 43,910 [26]
1973 Pirates Pittsburgh 66–72 (.478) 5th of 6 Steve Demeter did not qualify 45,915 [27]
1974 Pirates Pittsburgh 87–50 (.635) 1st of 6[d] Johnny Lipon (champions, no playoff) 41,379 [28]
1975 Pirates Pittsburgh 74–66 (.529) 3rd of 4 Johnny Lipon did not qualify 39,007 [29]
1976 Pirates Pittsburgh 68–69 (.496) 3rd of 4 Steve Demeter did not qualify 30,387 [30]
1977 Pirates Pittsburgh 66–72 (.478) 3rd of 4 Steve Demeter did not qualify 32,744 [31]
1978 Pirates Pittsburgh 72–63 (.533) 3rd of 6 Jim Mahoney did not qualify 51,096 [32]
1979 Pirates Pittsburgh 54–82 (.397) 6th of 6 Jim Mahoney did not qualify 43,036 [33]
1980 Pirates Pittsburgh 79–60 (.568) 2nd of 4 (Virginia) Johnny Lipon did not qualify 102,456 [34]
1981 Redbirds San Diego 66–74 (.471) 3rd of 4 (North)[e] Glenn Ezell lost to Hagerstown Suns (0–1) 72,125 [35]
1982 Redbirds San Diego 39–101 (.279) 4th of 4 (North) Jim Zerilla did not qualify 47,202 [36]
1983 Redbirds San Diego 50–89 (.360) 4th of 4 (North) Steve Smith did not qualify 56,451 [37]
1984 Redbirds Texas 64–74 (.464) 3rd of 4 (North) Bill Stearns did not qualify 61,623 [38]
1985 Redbirds Texas 72–65 (.526) 2nd of 4 (North) Bill Stearns did not qualify 71,788 [39]
1986 Redbirds Texas 45–93 (.326) 4th of 4 (North) Mike Bucci did not qualify 87,047 [40]
1987 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 80–59 (.576) 1st of 4 (North)[f] Steve Demeter defeated Hagerstown Suns (2–0)
defeated Kinston Indians (3–1)
111,661 [41]
1988 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 73–66 (.525) 2nd of 4 (North)[g] Jay Ward lost to Lynchburg Red Sox (1–2) 119,966 [42]
1989 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 63–75 (.457) 4th of 4 (North) Rocky Bridges did not qualify 121,581 [43]
1990 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 55–84 (.396) 4th of 4 (North) Stan Cliburn did not qualify 126,121 [44]
1991 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 63–77 (.450) 3rd of 4 (North) Stan Cliburn did not qualify 131,582 [45]
1992 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 64–76 (.457) 4th of 4 (North) John Wockenfuss did not qualify 159,316 [46]
1993 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 61–79 (.436) 4th of 4 (South) Scott Little did not qualify 145,657 [47]
1994 Buccaneers Pittsburgh 64–75 (.460) 3rd of 4 (South) Trent Jewett did not qualify 153,575 [48]
1995 Avalanche Colorado 68–72 (.486) 3rd of 4 (South) Bill Hayes did not qualify 140,111 [49]
1996 Avalanche Colorado 62–76 (.449) 4th of 4 (South) Bill McGuire did not qualify 173,703 [50]
1997 Avalanche Colorado 63–75 (.457) 2nd of 4 (South) Bill McGuire did not qualify 188,023 [51]
1998 Avalanche Colorado 62–78 (.443) 3rd of 4 (South) Jay Loviglio did not qualify 189,069 [52]
1999 Avalanche Colorado 69–69 (.500) 3rd of 4 (South) Ron Gideon did not qualify 206,012 [53]
2000 Avalanche Colorado 73–67 (.521) 2nd of 4 (South) Alan Cockrell did not qualify 200,863 [54]
2001 Avalanche Colorado 70–68 (.507) 3rd of 4 (South)[h] Dave Collins defeated Kinston Indians (2–1)
defeated Frederick Keys (3–2)
203,375 [56]
2002 Avalanche Colorado 74–66 (.529) 3rd of 4 (South) Stu Cole did not qualify 196,347 [57]
2003 Avalanche Houston 73–65 (.529) 1st of 4 (South)[i] John Massarelli did not qualify 175,155 [58]
2004 Avalanche Houston 65–74 (.468) 4th of 4 (South) Russ Nixon did not qualify 224,991 [59]
2005 Avalanche Houston 67–74 (.475) 3rd of 4 (South) Iván DeJesús did not qualify 255,225 [60]
2006 Avalanche Houston 76–61 (.555) 2nd of 4 (South)[j] Jim Pankovits lost to Kinston Indians (0–2) 237,724 [61]
2007 Avalanche Houston 79–60 (.568) 2nd (South)[k] Jim Pankovits defeated Kinston Indians (2–1)
lost to Frederick Keys (1–3)
258,469 [63]
2008 Avalanche Houston 56–84 (.400) 4th (South) Jim Pankovits did not qualify 235,823 [64]
2009 Red Sox Boston 67–72 (.482) 2nd (South)[l] Chad Epperson defeated Winston-Salem Dash (3–0)
lost to Lynchburg Hillcats (0–3)
231,186 [66]
2010 Red Sox Boston 73–65 (.529) 2nd (South) Kevin Boles did not qualify 211,527 [67]
2011 Red Sox Boston 64–75 (.460) 4th (South) Bruce Crabbe did not qualify 226,337 [68]
2012 Red Sox Boston 68–69 (.496) 3rd (South) Billy McMillon did not qualify 178,730 [69]
2013 Red Sox Boston 76–64 (.543) 2nd (South)[m] Billy McMillon defeated Myrtle Beach Pelicans (2–0)
defeated Potomac Nationals (3–0)
172,293 [71]
2014 Red Sox Boston 68–68 (.500) 2nd (South)[n] Carlos Febles lost to Myrtle Beach Pelicans (1–2) 220,782 [73]
2015 Red Sox Boston 66–73 (.475) 4th (South) Carlos Febles did not qualify 228,120 [74]
2016 Red Sox Boston 87–52 (.626) 1st (South)[o] Joe Oliver lost to Myrtle Beach Pelicans (1–2) 200,478 [77]
2017 Red Sox Boston 87–52 (.626) 2nd (North) Joe Oliver did not qualify 215,244 [78]
2018 Red Sox Boston 63–75 (.457) 5th (North) Joe Oliver did not qualify 192,621 [79]
2019 Red Sox Boston 67–70 (.489) 3rd (North)[p] Corey Wimberly lost to Wilmington Blue Rocks (2–3) 171,866 [81]
2020 Red Sox Boston season canceled, COVID-19 pandemic Corey Wimberly  
2021 Red Sox Boston 71–49 (.592) 1st (North)[q] Luke Montz did not qualify  

Source: [8]

Notable former playersEdit

At least two inductees to the National Baseball Hall of Fame played for Salem; Orlando Cepeda, who played 26 games for the Rebels in 1955,[82] and Larry Walker, who played two rehabilitation games with the Avalanche in 1996.[83]

Tim Murtaugh was a player, manager, and player-manager for Salem; he played 38 games for the 1965 Rebels, he managed the 1971 Rebels, and he appeared in 10 games while managing the 1972 Pirates.[84]

Mario Mendoza played 136 games for Salem in 1972, registering a .221 batting average,[85] slightly above the Mendoza Line that is named for him.

Daisuke Matsuzaka made a rehabilitation start for Salem in September 2009, in a Carolina League playoff game against the Winston-Salem Dash,[86] and later made a regular-season rehabilitation start for Salem in 2012.[87]

For notable players who made appearances with Salem, see:

Club recordsEdit

  • Batting: .370 – Oswaldo Olivares, 1977
  • Hits: 208 – Oswaldo Olivares, 1977
  • Doubles: 43 – Garrett Atkins, 2001
  • Triples: 17 – David Arrington, 1968
  • Home Runs: 34 – Gerald Davis, 1981
  • Total Bases: 280 – Oswaldo Olivares, 1977
  • Runs Batted In: 103 – Gerald Davis, 1981
  • Stolen Bases: 84 – Miguel Diloné, 1975
  • Wins: 16 – Jim Minshall 1972
  • Losses: 15 – Frank Brosious, 1983; James McKee, 1970
  • Strikeouts: 186 – Ed Whitson, 1976; Doug Bair, 1972
  • Walks: 127 – Benjamin Willbank, 1978
  • Innings Pitched: 203 – Ed Whitson, 1976
  • Earned Run Average: 2.11 – Josh Kalinowski, 1999
  • Saves: 27 – Travis Thompson, 1999

Media informationEdit

Team mascotsEdit

 
Mugsy

Lefty and Righty, the team's newest mascots; two person-sized red socks, each wearing a Boston Red Sox hat; one has an "L" on its back, the other has an "R".

Mugsy, a St. Bernard mascot who made his rookie debut in professional baseball in 1997 with the Avalanche. According to the team's website, Mugsy descended from the passing Hale-Bopp comet that raced across the Roanoke Valley sky on April 4, 1997.

Misty, a female saint bernard mascot who joined the team in 2005.

Big Mo, the Salem Avalanche's Kid's Club mascot; a giant abominable snowman.

The Baseball Nut, the Avalanche's first mascot, which resembled an almond. While the idea was original, the Baseball Nut proved to be unpopular. Lacking a cute or friendly appearance, the mascot intimidated children and was an object of derision by adult fans. Mugsy was developed as a replacement.

RosterEdit

Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

  • 22 Jacinto Arredondo
  • 16 Bradley Blalock
  • 34 Jordan DiValerio
  • 35 Shane Drohan
  • 29 Wilkelman Gonzalez
  • 14 Robert Kwiakowski
  • 31 Chih-Jung Liu
  • 23 Cole Milam
  • 37 Alexander Montero
  • 10 Wyatt Olds
  •  6 Aaron Perry  
  •  2 Jorge Rodriguez  
  • 12 Devon Roedahl
  •  5 Yasel Santana
  • 28 Joey Stock
  • 45 Miguel Suero
  • 46 Jacob Webb

Catchers

  • 39 Jonathan Diaz
  • 21 Jose Garcia
  • 17 Nathan Hickey  
  • 21 Alan Marrero ~

Infielders

Outfielders

  • 11 Nick Decker
  • 27 Gilberto Jimenez
  •  8 Eduardo Lopez  
  • 38 Angel Maita


Manager

Coaches

60-day injured list

  • -- Brock Bell

  7-day injured list
* On Boston Red Sox 40-man roster
~ Development list
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
± Taxi squad
† Temporarily inactive list
Roster updated September 12, 2021
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Low-A East
Boston Red Sox minor league players

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Salem is 677 miles (1,090 km) from Fenway Park in Boston.[1]
  2. ^ In 1955, Salem and the Johnson City Cardinals were declared league co-champions when the final playoff series was canceled due to rain.[7][8]: 485 
  3. ^ In 1972, Salem finished first in the 2nd half of the split-season.[8]: 558 
  4. ^ In 1974, Salem finished first in both halves of the split-season.[8]: 566 
  5. ^ In 1981, Salem finished first in the 2nd half of the split-season.[8]: 596 
  6. ^ In 1987, Salem finished first in the 2nd half of the split-season.[8]: 620 
  7. ^ In 1988, Salem finished first in the 1st half of the split-season.[8]: 624 
  8. ^ In 2001, the Kinston Indians finished first in both halves of the split-season; Salem qualified as a wild card by finishing second in the 2nd half of the split-season.[55]
  9. ^ In 2003, Salem did not win either half of the split-season, despite finishing with the best overall record in their division.[8]: 707 
  10. ^ In 2006, Salem finished first in the 2nd half of the split-season.[8]: 725 
  11. ^ In 2007, the Kinston Indians finished first in both halves of the split-season; Salem qualified as a wild card by finishing second in the 2nd half of the split-season.[62]
  12. ^ In 2009, the Winston-Salem Dash won the 1st half of the split-season, while for the 2nd half of the split-season, Salem and Winston-Salem tied for first place; both teams advanced to the playoffs.[65]
  13. ^ In 2013, Salem finished first in the 2nd half of the split-season.[70]
  14. ^ In 2014, the Myrtle Beach Pelicans finished first in both halves of the split-season; Salem qualified as a wild card by finishing second in the 2nd half of the split-season.[72]
  15. ^ In 2016, Salem finished first in the 1st half of the split-season.[75][76]
  16. ^ In 2019, Salem finished first in the 2nd half of the split-season.[80]
  17. ^ In 2021, Salem finished first in their division, but did not qualify for the postseason. The league did not play a split season, and only the top two teams with the best overall records, regardless of division, advanced to the playoffs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "MLB affiliate overview: American League East". MiLB.com. February 12, 2021. Retrieved February 15, 2021.
  2. ^ Mayo, Jonathan (February 12, 2021). "MLB Announces New Minors Teams, Leagues". Major League Baseball. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  3. ^ Collins, Matt (December 9, 2020). "Red Sox to reportedly keep all four full-season affiliates, leaving Lowell without affilation". overthemonster.com. Retrieved December 11, 2020.
  4. ^ Reichard, Kevin (December 10, 2020). "Red Sox: We'll fight to keep baseball in Lowell". Ballpark Digest. August Publications.
  5. ^ Gross, Mike (May 25, 2021). "Despite roster shortfall, Barnstormers, Atlantic League can't wait to get started". Lancaster Online. Retrieved August 31, 2021.
  6. ^ "Atlantic League president says Island "is close" to getting a franchise in 2022". Staten Island Advance. June 5, 2021.
  7. ^ "Appy Playoffs Are Cancelled Due To Rain". Bristol Herald Courier. Bristol, Tennessee. AP. September 4, 1955. p. C1. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l The Encyclopedia of Minor League Baseball. Lloyd Johnson & Miles Wolff, editors (Third ed.). Baseball America. 2007. ISBN 1932391177.CS1 maint: others (link)
  9. ^ "1955 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  10. ^ "1957 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  11. ^ "1958 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  12. ^ "1959 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  13. ^ "1960 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  14. ^ "1961 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  15. ^ "1962 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  16. ^ "1963 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  17. ^ "1964 Salem Rebels Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com.
  18. ^ "1965 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  19. ^ "1965 Salem Rebels Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com.
  20. ^ "1966 Salem Rebels Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com.
  21. ^ "1967 Salem Rebels Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com.
  22. ^ "1968 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  23. ^ "1969 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  24. ^ "1970 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  25. ^ "1971 Salem Rebels minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  26. ^ "1972 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  27. ^ "1973 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  28. ^ "1974 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  29. ^ "1975 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  30. ^ "1976 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  31. ^ "1977 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  32. ^ "1978 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  33. ^ "1979 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  34. ^ "1980 Salem Pirates minor league baseball Roster on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  35. ^ "1981 Salem Redbirds minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  36. ^ "1982 Salem Redbirds minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  37. ^ "1983 Salem Redbirds minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  38. ^ "1984 Salem Redbirds minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  39. ^ "1985 Salem Redbirds minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  40. ^ "1986 Salem Redbirds minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  41. ^ "1987 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  42. ^ "1988 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  43. ^ "1989 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  44. ^ "1990 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  45. ^ "1991 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  46. ^ "1992 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  47. ^ "1993 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  48. ^ "1994 Salem Buccaneers minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  49. ^ "1995 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  50. ^ "1996 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  51. ^ "1997 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  52. ^ "1998 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  53. ^ "1999 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  54. ^ "2000 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  55. ^ Tresolini, Kevin (September 3, 2001). "Rocks forced to do it all again". The News Journal. Wilmington, Delaware. p. C1. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  56. ^ "2001 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  57. ^ "2002 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  58. ^ "2003 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  59. ^ "2004 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  60. ^ "2005 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  61. ^ "2006 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  62. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". The Evening Sun. Hanover, Pennsylvania. September 4, 2007. p. B-3. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  63. ^ "2007 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  64. ^ "2008 Salem Avalanche minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  65. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". The News Journal. Wilmington, Delaware. September 8, 2009. p. C5. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  66. ^ "2009 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  67. ^ "2010 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  68. ^ "2011 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  69. ^ "2012 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  70. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". Rocky Mount Telegram. Rocky Mount, North Carolina. September 3, 2013. p. 3B. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  71. ^ "2013 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  72. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". The News & Observer. Raleigh, North Carolina. September 3, 2014. p. C5. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  73. ^ "2014 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  74. ^ "2015 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  75. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". The Sun News. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. June 24, 2016. p. B6. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  76. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". The Sun News. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. September 7, 2016. p. B5. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  77. ^ "2016 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  78. ^ "2017 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  79. ^ "2018 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  80. ^ "Carolina League (standings)". The News Journal. Wilmington, Delaware. September 6, 2019. p. B6. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  81. ^ "2019 Salem Red Sox minor league baseball Statistics on StatsCrew.com". StatsCrew.com.
  82. ^ "Orlando Cepeda Minor & Mexican Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 4, 2019.
  83. ^ "Larry Walker Minor Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  84. ^ "Tim Murtaugh Minor & Winter Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 16, 2021.
  85. ^ "Mario Mendoza Minor & Mexican Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 17, 2021.
  86. ^ Kilgore, Adam (September 11, 2009). "Dice-K On A Roll". Hartford Courant. Hartford, Connecticut. p. B-5. Retrieved February 17, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  87. ^ "Daisuke Matsuzaka Japanese, Minor & Winter Leagues Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved February 17, 2021.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit