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Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin), located in Washington, D.C., is a nonprofit (501(c)(3)) organization promoting global vaccine development, availability, and use. Through its work, Sabin hopes to reduce human suffering by preventing the spread of vaccine-preventable, communicable disease in humans through herd immunity, and also hopes to mitigate the poverty caused by these diseases.

Sabin Vaccine Institute
Sabinlogo-highres.jpg
Named afterAlbert B. Sabin
Established1993; 26 years ago (1993)
Founders
TypeCharitable organization
Purposevaccination and disease prevention
HeadquartersWashington, D.C.
Coordinates38°54′01″N 77°02′46″W / 38.9002964°N 77.0460199°W / 38.9002964; -77.0460199Coordinates: 38°54′01″N 77°02′46″W / 38.9002964°N 77.0460199°W / 38.9002964; -77.0460199
Amy Finan
Websitewww.sabin.org

Contents

BackgroundEdit

Founded in 1993[1][2] in honor of its eponym, Albert B. Sabin, creator of the oral polio vaccine, Sabin works to reduce "human suffering from vaccine-preventable and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs)."[3] The organization endeavors to reach its goal via its three main programs: Sabin Vaccine Development, the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases, and Vaccine Advocacy and Education.[4] Through its Product Development Partnership (PDP), Sabin has worked with organizations such as King Saud University,[5] Texas Children's Hospital Center,[6] International Vaccine Institute,[7] and George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences[8] toward its goals, with funding and support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation,[8][9] the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases,[10] the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs,[11] the Brazilian Ministry of Health[11] and other benefactors.

Vaccine development and researchEdit

In 2012, Sabin partnered with International Vaccine Institute to combine their research, development, and promotion efforts in Asia, Africa, and the Americas.[7] Sabin is currently working on multiple vaccines for humans[3] including vaccines for Hookworm infection (Na-GST-1, Na-APR-1),[11][8][12][13] Schistosomiasis (Sm-TSP-2),[14][15][16][17] Chagas disease (Tc24, TSA-1),[18][6][19] Leishmaniasis (Ld-NH36, PdSP15),[20][21][22] Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)/Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) (Pan-β-CoVax),[23][24][25] Soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH),[26][27] and Onchocerciasis (Ov-103, Ov-RAL-2).[28][29][30][31][28]

Neglected tropical diseasesEdit

In 2006, Sabin co-founded the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases in order "to raise the awareness, political will and funding necessary to control and eliminate the most common NTDs."[32] Through its work on NTDs, Sabin hopes to reduce poverty caused by these diseases as many of them have been shown to adversely affect "childhood cognitive development among the poor, thereby reinforcing poverty."[33]

Advocacy and educationEdit

Sabin works with experts and organizations from around the world to advance knowledge of both infectious diseases and the vaccines that can prevent them. Through the International Association of Immunization Managers (IAIM) Network, Sabin arranges international forums to improve the success rates of immunization programs.[4] Sabin serves as the Secretariat for the Coalition against Typhoid whose mission is to raise awareness of Typhoid and Salmonellosis.[34]

Board of directorsEdit

  • Axel Hoos (Chairman)
  • Amy Finan (Ex Officio Trustee)
  • Peter L. Thoren (Vice Chairman)
  • Wendy Commins Holman
  • Kenneth Kelley
  • Paul Maddon
  • Michael W. Marine
  • Regina Rabinovich
  • Philip K. Russell (past Chairman)
  • Heloisa Sabin (In Memoriam of Founding Member and Honorary Trustee)
  • H. R. Shepherd (In Memoriam of the Founding Chairman)[35]

Gold medal awardEdit

First awarded in 1994, the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal is presented by Sabin each year to one or more persons who have made a major contribution to the field of vaccinology or related fields. The award is given in honor of the work of Albert B. Sabin.[36] Past recipients of the award include Samuel L. Katz (2003), Joseph L. Melnick (1996), and Ruth S. Nussenzweig (2008).[37]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "In Memoriam: Heloisa Sabin". Sabin. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  2. ^ "The Legacy of Albert B. Sabin". Sabin. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  3. ^ a b "SABIN Vaccine Institute". Michelson Medical Research Foundation. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Immunization Manager Network". Sabin. Retrieved 2 September 2017.
  5. ^ "Sabin PDP, King Saud University Sign Project Agreement to Build Vaccine Research and Development Capacity in Saudi Arabia". U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Saudi Arabia. 16 November 2015. Archived from the original on 9 September 2017. Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  6. ^ a b "Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development awarded grant to develop therapeutic vaccine for chagas disease". Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation. 17 July 2015. Archived from the original on 28 July 2016. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  7. ^ a b "IVI and Sabin Vaccine Institute Form a Strategic Alliance to Develop Vaccines for the World's Poor". International Vaccine Institute. 18 July 2012. Archived from the original on 6 September 2017. Retrieved 6 September 2017.
  8. ^ a b c "Hookworm Vaccine Research". Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Archived from the original on 11 September 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  9. ^ "Sabin Vaccine Colloquium". Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Archived from the original on 20 September 2015. Retrieved 20 September 2017.
  10. ^ Dipali Pathak (30 August 2016). "Grant to develop chikungunya virus vaccine awarded". Baylor College of Medicine. Archived from the original on 20 May 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2017.
  11. ^ a b c Hotez, Peter J.; Diemert, David; Bacon, Kristina M.; Beaumier, Coreen; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brooker, Simon; Couto, Artur Roberto; da Silva Freire, Marcos; Homma, Akira; Lee, Bruce Y.; Loukas, Alex; Loblack, Marva; Morel, Carlos Medicis; Oliveira, Rodrigo Correa; Russell, Philip K. (18 April 2013). "The Human Hookworm Vaccine". Vaccine. 31 (Suppl 2): B227–B232. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.11.034. ISSN 0264-410X. PMC 3988917.
  12. ^ "Status of Vaccine Research and Development of Vaccines for Human Hookworm Infection" (PDF). World Health Organization. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 August 2017. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  13. ^ "Study of Co-administered Na-APR-1 (M74) and Na-GST-1 in Gabonese Children - Full Text View". clinicaltrials.gov. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  14. ^ Tebeje, Biniam Mathewos; Harvie, Marina; You, Hong; Loukas, Alex; McManus, Donald P. (30 September 2016). "Schistosomiasis vaccines: where do we stand?". Parasites & Vectors. 9: 528. doi:10.1186/s13071-016-1799-4. ISSN 1756-3305. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  15. ^ Merrifield, Maureen; Hotez, Peter J.; Beaumier, Coreen M.; Gillespie, Portia; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Bottazzi, Maria Elena (3 June 2016). "Advancing a vaccine to prevent human schistosomiasis". Vaccine. 34 (26): 2988–2991. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.079. ISSN 1873-2518. PMID 27036511.
  16. ^ "A Phase I Study of the Safety, Reactogenicity, and Immunogenicity of Sm-TSP-2/Alhydrogel® With or Without GLA-AF for Intestinal Schistosomiasis in Healthy Adults - Full Text View". ClinicalTrials.gov. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  17. ^ "A Phase Ib Study of the Safety, Reactogenicity, and Immunogenicity of Sm-TSP-2/Alhydrogel® With or Without AP 10-701 for Intestinal Schistosomiasis in Healthy Exposed Adults - Full Text View". ClinicalTrials.gov. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  18. ^ Beaumier, Coreen M.; Gillespie, Portia M.; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Hotez, Peter J.; Bottazzi, Maria Elena (3 June 2016). "Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for Chagas disease". Vaccine. 34 (26): 2996–3000. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.03.074. ISSN 1873-2518. PMID 27026146.
  19. ^ "Chagas". Sabin. Archived from the original on 12 July 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  20. ^ Gillespie, Portia M.; Beaumier, Coreen M.; Strych, Ulrich; Hayward, Tara; Hotez, Peter J.; Bottazzi, Maria Elena (3 June 2016). "Status of vaccine research and development of vaccines for leishmaniasis". Vaccine. 34 (26): 2992–2995. doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.12.071. ISSN 1873-2518. PMID 26973063.
  21. ^ Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Kelleher, Alan; Liu, Zhuyun; Pollet, Jeroen; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Rezende, Wanderson C.; Groen, Mallory Jo; Seid, Christopher A.; Abdeladhim, Maha; Townsend, Shannon; Castro, Waldione de; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Zhan, Bin; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Valenzuela, Jesus G. (9 March 2017). "Structure of SALO, a leishmaniasis vaccine candidate from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis". PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 11 (3): e0005374. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0005374. ISSN 1935-2735. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  22. ^ "Leishmaniasis". Sabin. Archived from the original on 12 July 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  23. ^ Jiang, Shibo; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Du, Lanying; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te Kent; Curti, Elena; Jones, Kathryn; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J (December 2012). "Roadmap to developing a recombinant coronavirus S protein receptor-binding domain vaccine for severe acute respiratory syndrome". Expert Review of Vaccines. 11 (12): 1405–1413. doi:10.1586/erv.12.126. ISSN 1476-0584. PMC 3586247.
  24. ^ Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Du, Lanying; Chag, Shivali M.; Ma, Cuiqing; Tricoche, Nancy; Tao, Xinrong; Seid, Christopher A.; Hudspeth, Elissa M.; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te K.; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J.; Zhan, Bin; Jiang, Shibo (2014). "Yeast-expressed recombinant protein of the receptor-binding domain in SARS-CoV spike protein with deglycosylated forms as a SARS vaccine candidate". Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics. 10 (3): 648–658. ISSN 2164-554X. PMID 24355931.
  25. ^ "SARS/MERS". Sabin. Archived from the original on 12 July 2017. Retrieved 18 September 2017.
  26. ^ Zhan, Bin; Beaumier, Coreen M; Briggs, Neima; Jones, Kathryn M; Keegan, Brian P; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J (2014). "Advancing a multivalent 'Pan-anthelmintic' vaccine against soil-transmitted nematode infections". Expert Review of Vaccines. 13 (3): 321–331. doi:10.1586/14760584.2014.872035. ISSN 1476-0584. PMC 3934375.
  27. ^ "Helminth Vaccine Discovery Program funded by Dr. Gary K. Michelson". Michelson Medical Research Foundation. 27 April 2014. Retrieved 8 September 2017.
  28. ^ a b "Onchocerciasis". Sabin. Archived from the original on 12 July 2017. Retrieved 11 September 2017.
  29. ^ Hotez, Peter J.; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Zhan, Bin; Makepeace, Benjamin L.; Klei, Thomas R.; Abraham, David; Taylor, David W.; Lustigman, Sara (29 January 2015). "The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa—TOVA—Initiative". PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 9 (1): e0003422. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0003422. ISSN 1935-2735. Retrieved 11 September 2017.
  30. ^ "The Partners". The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa Initiative. Archived from the original on 14 February 2017. Retrieved 11 September 2017.
  31. ^ "The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) - A global initiative to advance river blindness vaccine". Edinburgh Infectious Diseases. 27 August 2015. Archived from the original on 11 September 2017. Retrieved 11 September 2017.
  32. ^ "The Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases". Sabin. Archived from the original on 6 September 2017. Retrieved 9 September 2017.
  33. ^ Hotez, Peter J (16 December 2014). "The Medical Biochemistry of Poverty and Neglect". Molecular Medicine. 20 (Suppl 1): S31–S36. doi:10.2119/molmed.2014.00169. ISSN 1076-1551. PMC 4374519.
  34. ^ "Coalition Against Typhoid". Coalition Against Typhoid. Archived from the original on 14 September 2017. Retrieved 14 September 2017.
  35. ^ "Board of Trustees". Sabin. Retrieved 29 August 2017.
  36. ^ "The Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award". Sabin. Archived from the original on 28 August 2017. Retrieved 21 September 2017.
  37. ^ "The Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award". Sabin. Archived from the original on 28 August 2017. Retrieved 4 October 2017.

External linksEdit