Saatli Mosque

Saatli Mosque (Azerbaijani: Saatlı məscidi) is a mosque located in Shusha, Azerbaijan it was under control of Armenian forces since the Capture of Shusha on May 8, 1992 until the city’s recapture by Azerbaijan on 8 November 2020.[1][2][3]

Saatli Mosque
Շուշիի Գյովհար Աղայի ներքին մզկիթ 02.JPG
The mosque in 2013
Religion
AffiliationIslam
Location
LocationShusha, Azerbaijan
Geographic coordinates39°45′46″N 46°45′04″E / 39.76278°N 46.75107°E / 39.76278; 46.75107Coordinates: 39°45′46″N 46°45′04″E / 39.76278°N 46.75107°E / 39.76278; 46.75107
Architecture
Architect(s)Karbalayi Safikhan Karabakhi
StyleIslamic architecture
Completed1883
Minaret(s)2 (one completely destroyed during occupation)

HistoryEdit

Saatli Mosque was built in 1883 in the same name neighbourhood of Shusha. Saatli is one of the upper neighbourhoods of Shusha established in the 19th century.[4] Being another produce of prominent Azerbaijani architect Karbalayi Safikhan Karabakhi, the mosque and its minarets follow the design of earlier mosques of Shusha, Yukhari Govhar Agha Mosque, Ashaghi Govhar Agha Mosque and the Agdam Mosque in Agdam. Saatli Mosque is considered one of the final masterpieces of Karbalayi Safikhan Karabakhi, built with two minarets.[5] The mosque has a three-naved prayer hall and brick minaret with especially patterned decoration specific to architecture of Karabakh.[4][6] Saatli Mosque has been renovated in 1980's. After the occupation in May 1992, it remains in ruins.[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Plants Genetic Resources in Central Asia and Caucasus". Retrieved 20 July 2010.
  2. ^ "Shusha State Historical & Architectural Reserve". Archived from the original on 4 October 2010. Retrieved 3 August 2010.
  3. ^ "Şuşa qalalar şəhəri, muzeylər məskəni idi". Retrieved 5 August 2010.
  4. ^ a b "Karabakh Foundation". Archived from the original on 4 October 2010. Retrieved 4 August 2010.
  5. ^ "The Wonders of Azerbaijan". Retrieved 3 August 2010.
  6. ^ "Saatli Mosque (Azerbaijan)". Archived from the original on 26 July 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2010.
  7. ^ "Karabakh monuments". Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2010.

External linksEdit