Roy Dutton

Air Commodore Roy Gilbert Dutton, CBE, DSO, DFC & Bar (2 March 1917 – 14 September 1988) was a Royal Air Force officer and decorated flying ace. He flew Hurricanes during the Second World War and was credited with 19 confirmed aerial victories.[1][2]

Roy Gilbert Dutton
Born(1917-03-02)2 March 1917
Hatton, British Ceylon
Died14 September 1988(1988-09-14) (aged 71)
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Air Force
Years of service1936–1970
RankAir Commodore
Commands heldRAF Waterbeach (1955–58)
RAF Seaton Snook (1954–55)
No. 46 Squadron RAF (1946)
No. 525 Squadron RAF (1945–46)
No. 512 Squadron RAF (1945)
No. 19 Squadron RAF (1941)
No. 452 Squadron RAAF (1941)
Battles/warsSecond World War
AwardsCommander of the Order of the British Empire
Distinguished Service Order
Distinguished Flying Cross & Bar
Mentioned in Despatches

Early lifeEdit

Dutton was born on 2 March 1917 in Hatton, British Ceylon. He was educated in England.[2]

Military careerEdit

On 24 August 1936, Dutton was commissioned into the Royal Air Force as an acting pilot officer (on probation).[3] On 29 June 1937, his commission was confirmed and he was regraded to pilot officer.[4] On 29 January 1939, he was promoted to flying officer.[5]

On 18 May 1940, he shot down two Heinkel He 111s while on patrol over Belgium. The following day, on 19 May, he shot down an additional Heinkel He 111 while flying west of Arras, northern France.[2][6] He was promoted to flight lieutenant on 3 September 1940.[7] On 1 December 1941, he was promoted to squadron leader (temporary).[8] He was promoted to substantive squadron leader on 9 December 1943.[9] On 1 July 1944, he was promoted to wing commander (temporary).[10]

He remained in the Royal Air Force following the end of the Second World War. On 1 September 1945, he was granted a permanent commission and the rank of squadron leader in the post-war RAF.[11] He was later granted seniority in that rank from 1 June 1944.[12] He relinquished the acting rank of wing commander on 1 November 1947.[13] He was promoted to substantive wing commander on 1 July 1950[14] and to group captain on 1 July 1957.[15]

He retired from the Royal Air Force on 3 December 1970 and was allowed to retain the rank of air commodore.[16]

Honours and decorationsEdit

Dutton received a number of decorations during the Second World War. On 31 May 1940, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) "in recognition of gallantry displayed in flying operations against the enemy".[6] On 20 August 1940, he was awarded a Bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross; this represents a second DFC.[17] He was a recipient of the 1939–45 Star with Battle of Britain clasp.[18] On 8 June 1945, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".[19]

In the 1966 Queen's Birthday Honours, he was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).[20] He was appointed Aide-de-Camp (ADC) to Queen Elizabeth II on 16 February 1965,[21] and relinquished the appointment on 3 December 1970.[22]

Acting Flight Lieutenant Roy Gilbert DUTTON (39072)
In May, 1940, whilst leading a section of a squadron on patrol over Brussels. Flt. Lt. Dutton attacked and shot down two Heinkel 111 aircraft. The next day, when leading a section of a squadron, seven Messerschmitt fighters were sighted escorting from fifty to seventy enemy bombers. The leader of the formation attacked the bombers, and Flt. Lt. Dutton, realising the danger to the formation, ordered two aircraft of his own section also to attack the bombers whilst he climbed and engaged the Messerschmitts until the attack on the bombers was completed. He then dived away, and flying west sighted and shot down a Heinkel 111 with his remaining ammunition. Flt. Lt. Dutton has displayed initiative, gallantry and a complete disregard for his own safety.

— DFC citation[6]

Acting Flight Lieutenant Roy Gilbert DUTTON (39072)
This officer has led patrols with conspicuous success and has personally destroyed at least twelve enemy aircraft. He has displayed splendid qualities of leadership and courage, with a complete disregard for his own safety.

— DFC and Bar citation[17]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Air Cdre Roy Dutton: Intrepid air warrior". The Times (63189). 17 September 1988. p. 12.
  2. ^ a b c Shores, Christopher; Wiliams, Clive (1994). Aces high: a tribute to the most notable fighter pilots of the British and Commonwealth Forces in WWII (2nd ed.). London: Grub Street. pp. 242–243. ISBN 1898697000.
  3. ^ "No. 34323". The London Gazette. 15 September 1936. p. 5940.
  4. ^ "No. 34421". The London Gazette. 27 July 1937. p. 4816.
  5. ^ "No. 34594". The London Gazette. 31 January 1939. p. 690.
  6. ^ a b c "No. 34860". The London Gazette. 28 May 1940. pp. 3251–3253.
  7. ^ "No. 34989". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 November 1940. pp. 6493–6494.
  8. ^ "No. 35383". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 December 1941. pp. 7110–7111.
  9. ^ "No. 36405". The London Gazette (Supplement). 29 February 1944. p. 1052.
  10. ^ "No. 36618". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 July 1944. pp. 3398–3399.
  11. ^ "No. 37511". The London Gazette (Supplement). 22 March 1946. pp. 1532–1533.
  12. ^ "No. 37892". The London Gazette (Supplement). 25 February 1947. p. 970.
  13. ^ "No. 38125". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 November 1947. p. 5433.
  14. ^ "No. 38955". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 June 1950. p. 3359.
  15. ^ "No. 41111". The London Gazette (Supplement). 25 June 1957. p. 3859.
  16. ^ "No. 45259". The London Gazette (Supplement). 22 December 1970. p. 14055.
  17. ^ a b "No. 34927". The London Gazette (Supplement). 20 August 1940. p. 5091.
  18. ^ "Battle of Britain – Roll of Honour". History. Royal Air Force. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  19. ^ "No. 37115". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 June 1945. p. 2895.
  20. ^ "No. 44004". The London Gazette (Supplement). 3 June 1966. p. 6537.
  21. ^ "No. 43577". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 February 1965. p. 1677.
  22. ^ "No. 45303". The London Gazette (Supplement). 12 February 1971. p. 1403.