Rowan Moore is an architecture critic.[1] He is the brother of the journalist and newspaper editor Charles Moore.[2][3] He trained as an architect at the University of Cambridge, but, having gone into practice, turned to journalism.[4][5] He has been editor of the architecture journal Blueprint, and has written for the Evening Standard (London) and The Guardian.[6] In 2002 he succeeded Lucy Musgrave as director of the Architecture Foundation, leaving to concentrate on journalism full-time in 2008.[7][8][9] That directorship is now held by Sarah Ichioka.

Selected worksEdit

  • Panoramas of London (1993)
  • Struktur, Raum Und Haut (1995)
  • The New Art Gallery Walsall (2000)
  • Building Tate Modern: Herzog & De Meuron (2000)
  • Why We Build (2012)
  • Anatomy of a Building (2014)
  • Slow Burn City: London in the Twenty-First Century (2016)[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "BBC Radio London - Robert Elms, With Ruthie Foster and Rowan Moore". BBC. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  2. ^ Moore, Rowan (30 December 2018). "Rowan Moore's best architecture of 2018". The Guardian. The Guardian. Archived from the original on 15 May 2019. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  3. ^ Stockley, Philippa (26 September 2012). "Why We Build by Rowan Moore: review". Britain: Telegraph.co.uk. Archived from the original on 16 October 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2019.
  4. ^ Filler, Martin (5 June 2014). "The Insolence of Architecture". ISSN 0028-7504. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  5. ^ "Archinect News Articles tagged "rowan moore"". archinect.com. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  6. ^ "Rowan Moore". Pan Macmillan. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  7. ^ Waite, Richard. "Rowan Moore resigns as director of the Architecture Foundation". Architects Journal. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  8. ^ November, 23; Coates, 2012By Nigel. "Rowan Moore Asks Why We Build?". Architectural Review. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  9. ^ "BBC Radio 3 - Free Thinking, Neil Jordan, the Lonely City, Contemporary Cities". BBC. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  10. ^ "Rowan Moore books and biography | Waterstones". www.waterstones.com. Retrieved 4 October 2019.

External linksEdit