Ron Hagerthy

Ronald F. Hagerthy is an American actor on television and in films.

Ron Hagerthy
Sky King cast.JPG
Hagerthy at right with Kirby Grant and Gloria Winters in Sky King.
Born
OccupationActor
Spouse(s)Patti Taylor

Early yearsEdit

Hagerthy was born in Aberdeen, South Dakota, but moved to Glendale, California, before he started school. He attended Glendale City College[1] and once worked as an ambulance driver.[2] His acting career was interrupted by two years' service in the Army.[3]

CareerEdit

On television, in the 1950s, Hagerthy portrayed Clipper King (nephew of the title character) in the modern Western series, Sky King.[4] He also appeared on Matinee Theater,[3] Gunsmoke, Navy Log, and Tales of Wells Fargo.[2]

On film, Hagerthy portrayed Dick Cvetic in I Was a Communist for the FBI (1951)[1] and Cpl. Rich Williams in Starlift (1951).[5] He also appeared in Make Haste to Live,[6] Eighteen and Anxious,[2] Charge at Feather River, The City That Never Sleeps, and Force of Arms.[3]

Personal lifeEdit

Hagerthy married Patti Taylor, who was his sweetheart from his school days.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Adams, Marjory (May 7, 1953). "Movie Question Box". The Boston Globe. p. 10. Retrieved January 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ a b c Varner, Fields (November 17, 1957). "Two Hollywood Newcomers Visit Montgomery To Boos New Movie, Appear At Local Theatre". The Montgomery Advertiser. Alabama, Montgomery. p. 6. Retrieved January 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b c "Five Young Stars Due In Austin". The Austin American. Texas, Austin. November 10, 1957. p. 27. Retrieved January 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ McNeil, Alex (1996). Total Television (4th ed.). New York, New York: Penguin Books USA, Inc. p. 763. ISBN 0-14-02-4916-8.
  5. ^ Crowther, Bosley. "The Screen in Review: 'Starlift' Provides Warners With Opportunity to Parade Its Stable of Stars". The New York Times. p. 11. Retrieved January 19, 2021 – via ProQuest.
  6. ^ "Tourist Mecca Locale of Film". The Los Angeles Times. April 28, 1954. p. 63. Retrieved January 19, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.