Roman Catholic Diocese of Patti

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Patti (Latin: Dioecesis Pactensis) is located on the north shore of the island of Sicily. It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Messina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela.[1][2] Its patron saint is Bartholomew the Apostle, in whose honor the Cathedral is named.

Diocese of Patti

Dioecesis Pactensis
Cattedrale patti.jpg
Patti Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical provinceMessina-Lipari-Santa Lucia del Mela
Statistics
Area1,648 km2 (636 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2013)
161,400 (est.)
166,400 (est.) (97.0%)
Parishes40
Information
DenominationCatholic
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established12th Century
CathedralCattedrale di S. Bartolomeo
Secular priests113
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopGiglielmo Giombanco
Bishops emeritusIgnazio Zambito
Map
Locator map of Patti
Website
diocesipatti.it

HistoryEdit

The diocese of Patti had an ancient precursor, the diocese of Tyndaris.[3] Three of its bishops are known by name:

There was also a predecessor in the form of a Diocese of Lipari, which appears to have become extinct, perhaps due to Saracen raids in the 9th century.[6] The bishops known by name are:

  • Augustus (501, 502)
  • Venantius (553)
  • Agatho (593)
  • [Paulinus] (under Pope Gregory I)[7]

The importance of Patti grew, however, when Duke Robert Guiscard and Count Roger I founded on the island of Lipari Patti a Benedictine abbey, dedicated to Saint Bartholomew, in c. 1085;[8] the abbey was joined to the Abbey of S. Salvatore when it was founded in 1094.[9] On 14 September 1131 Anacletus II, the pope from the double election of 1130 who was recognized in the Kingdom of Sicily, made the monastery of S. Bartholomew in Patti an episcopal see, and at the same time made the Abbey of Lipari an episcopal seat, uniting them in the person of one bishop, who would be consecrated by the Archbishop of Messana.[10] The new See was endowed by King Roger II of Sicily, making it richer than the long established See of Syracuse.[11] Pope Eugenius III in 1157 confirmed the action of Anacletus II.

In 1206, it lost territory to establish the territorial prelature of Santa Lucia del Mela.

Frederick III of Sicily (1295–1337) devastated Patti because the town was a supporter of his Angevin rivals, Robert and Philip of Naples.[12] The French Pope John XXII, who supported the Angevins, laid all of Sicily under an interdict, which lasted from 1321 to 1335, causing severe problems between the Sicilian episcopate and the monarchy.

On 18 April 1399, Lipari and Patti were separated,[13] and the first bishop of the separate see of Patti was Francesco Hermemir. His predecessor, Francesco Gaptulus, continued as Bishop of Lipari.

The Cathedral of S. Bartolommeo in Patti had a Chapter consisting of five dignities and nine Canons.[14]

In 1827 the bishopric gained territory from the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Messina. On 20 May 1844 the diocese exchanged territory with the bishopric of Cefalù.

The diocese had in the early 20th century 49 parishes, 20,000 inhabitants, 5 religious houses of men, and 15 of sisters, conducting 4 institutes for girls and several schools.

Pope John Paul II visited the diocese in June 1988.[citation needed]

BishopsEdit

Diocese of PattiEdit

Erected: 12th Century

...
  • Gilibertus[15] (1157–1166)
  • Stephanus (1180–1199)
  • Anselmus (c. 1208 – 1227?)
  • Jacobus[16] ( – 25 September 1225)
  • Paganus[17] (10 October 1229 – 3 March 1246)
  • Philippus[18] (attested in 1250)
  • Bartholomaeus de Lentino, O.P. (5 January 1254 – 1282)[19]
  • Pandulfus[20] (25 February 1286 – 4 July 1290)
  • Joannes, O.P.[21] (1304 – 1342)
  • Vincentius, O.Min. (27 November 1342 – 1346)
  • Petrus de Teutonico, O.Min.[22] (15 February 1346 – 21 January 1354)
  • Petrus de Thomas, O.Carm.[23] (1354 – 10 May 1359)
  • Joannes Graphei, O.Min. (17 July 1360 – 1373)
  • Ubertinus de Coriliono, O.Min. (28 November 1373 – 1386)[24]
  • Franciscus, O.P. (30 May 1386 – 18 March 1388)[25]
  • Ubertinus de Coriliono, O.Min. (restored, 16 May 1390 – 18 August 1397)[26]
  • Franciscus Gaptulus[27] (18 December 1397 – 18 April 1399)
  • Franciscus Hermemir[28] (12 May 1399 – 1400/1401)
  • Paulus de Prato[29] (18 July 1401 – 26 June 1402)
  • Philippus de Ferrerio, O.Carm.[30] (8 July 1402 – 4 July 1414)
...

from 1500 to 1800Edit

Since 1800Edit

  • Silvestro Todaro, O.F.M. Conv.[51] (22 Jul 1816 – 21 Apr 1821)
  • Nicolò Gatto (17 Nov 1823 – 31 Dec 1831 Died)
  • Giuseppe Saitta[52] (30 Sep 1833 – 20 Jun 1838 Died)
  • Martino Ursino (Orsino) (25 Jul 1844 – 8 Feb 1860 Died)
  • Michelangelo Celesia, O.S.B. (23 Mar 1860 – 27 Oct 1871)[53]
  • Ignazio Carlo Vittore Papardo del Parco, C.R.[54] (27 Oct 1871 – 22 Nov 1874 Died)
  • Giuseppe Maria Maragioglio, O.F.M. Cap.[55] (15 Mar 1875 – 20 Jan 1888 Died)
  • Giovanni Previtera (Privitera) (1 Jun 1888 – 14 Feb 1903 Died)
  • Francesco Maria Traina (22 Jun 1903 – 18 Nov 1911 Died)
  • Ferdinando Fiandaca (10 Apr 1912 – 1 Aug 1930 Resigned)
  • Antonio Mantiero (26 Sep 1931 – 24 Aug 1936 Appointed, Bishop of Treviso)
  • Angelo Ficarra (12 Oct 1936 – 2 Aug 1957 Resigned)
  • Giuseppe Pullano (2 Aug 1957 – 30 Nov 1977 Died)
  • Carmelo Ferraro (30 Mar 1978 – 3 Nov 1988 Appointed, Bishop of Agrigento)
  • Ignazio Zambito (12 May 1989 – 1 February 2017)
  • Giglielmo Giombanco (1 February 2017 – )[56]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Diocese of Patti" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016[self-published source?]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Patti" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source?]
  3. ^ Francesco Lanzoni (1927). Le diocesi d'Italia dalle origini al principio del secolo VII (an. 604) (in Italian). Rome: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana. p. 650.
  4. ^ Eutychius wrote to Pope Gregory I, asking for aid against certain worshippers of idols and against 'Angelli'. Gregory replied that he had referred the matter to the Praetor of Sicily. P. Jaffe, Regesta pontificum Romanorum Vol. I, editio altera (Leipzig 1885), p. 158, no. 1263 (August 593).
  5. ^ Lanzoni, p. 650. Jaffe, p. 195, no. 1707 (July 1599).
  6. ^ Lanzoni, pp. 654-655. Ferdinando Ughelli; Nicolò Coleti (1717). Italia sacra: sive De episcopis Italiae et insularum adjacentium, rebusque abiis praeclare gestis... (in Latin). Tomus primus. Venice: Sebastianum Coleti. p. 775.
  7. ^ Paulinus was Bishop of Tauriana in the Abruzzi, and was ordered by Pope Gregory I to administer the diocese of Lipari and live there. In 597 Pope Gregory instructed the Bishop of Reggio and the Bishop of Lipari to come to Rome. Whether this was Paulinus, or a successor in the diocese of Lipari, is unknown.
  8. ^ Pirro, p. 770.
  9. ^ The charters are quoted by Pirro, pp. 770-772.
  10. ^ Alex Metcalfe (2014). Muslims of Medieval Italy. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 119–121. ISBN 978-0-7486-8843-2. The text of Pope Anacletus' bull is given in full in Pirro, pp. 387-388; and see pp. 770-771.
  11. ^ G. A. Loud (2007). The Latin Church in Norman Italy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 394–395. ISBN 978-1-107-32000-0.
  12. ^ Cappelletti, p. 581.
  13. ^ The text of the bull of Boniface IX is given by Pirro, p. 782. Eubel, I, p. 384 note 11.
  14. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 302 note 1.
  15. ^ Pirro, p. 776. Gams, p. 976.
  16. ^ Bishop Jacobus was transferred to the diocese of Capua on 27 September 1225 by Pope Honorius III. Frederick II forbade his entry into the diocese. Gams, p. 976. Eubel, I, p. 164, 384.
  17. ^ Paganus sensibly went to Frederick II and requested confirmation of his election to the diocese; it was granted on 10 October 1129. Pirro, p. 777, no. VII. Eubel, I, p. 384.
  18. ^ Pirro, p. 227, quotes a document of December, 1250, which mentions a procurator of Bishop Philippus.
  19. ^ Eubel, I, p. 384.
  20. ^ Pandulfus was named bishop by Pope Honorius IV in 1286, but on 26 July 1289 he had still been unable to enter his diocese. Pandulfus, an exile from Sicily, was named Administrator of the diocese of Torres (Sassari) in Sardinia. In 1296 he was named to the See of Ancona. Pirro, p. 779. Gams, p. 840. Eubel, I, p. 87, 384, 504.
  21. ^ A native of Catania and a Canon of Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome, Giovanni was appointed bishop by Boniface VIII on 31 January 1304. Pirro, p. 779, no. XII. Eubel, I, p. 384. Gams, p. 840, makes him a Franciscan.
  22. ^ Daniel Williman (1988). The Right of Spoil of the Popes of Avignon, 1316-1415. Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society. p. 213. ISBN 978-0-87169-786-8. Pirro, p. 779, no. XVI, quotes the letter of appointment of Pope Clement VI of 15 February 1346, calling him a Franciscan. Eubel, I, p. 384.
  23. ^ Petrus was transferred to the diocese of Corona, a suffragan of Patras in Greece, on 10 May 1359. Eubel, I, p. 212.
  24. ^ Bishop Ubertinus was removed by Urban VI. Eubel, I, p. 384.
  25. ^ Fra. Francesco was transferred to the diocese of Mazara by Urban VI. Eubel, I, pp. 332, 384.
  26. ^ Bishop Ubertino was transferred to the diocese of Gaeta by Pope Boniface IX of the Roman Obedience. Eubel, I, pp. 258, 384.
  27. ^ Gaptulus continued as Bishop of Lipari, while relinquishing Patti on 18 April 1399. He was dead before 11 July 1400. Eubel, I, pp. 308, 384, with note 11.
  28. ^ Hermemir's bull of appointment by Pope Boniface IX is quoted by Pirro, pp. 782-783. Eubel, I, p. 384.
  29. ^ Bishop Paulus was transferred to the See of Oristano (Arborensis) in Sardinia on 26 June 1402. Eubel, I, pp. 102, 384.
  30. ^ Ferrario was transferred to Agrigento on 4 July 1414. Pirro, p. 783, no. XXIII. Eubel, I, pp. 79, 384.
  31. ^ Francesco Urvio,in the course of controversies with the capitano dello spagnuolo, was imprisoned; later, on 15 May 1532, Pope Clement VII authorized his transfer to the diocese of Urgell. Eubel, II, p. 210; III, p. 324.
  32. ^ Sebastiani attended the Council of Trent, and was governor of Sicily for three years; he was appointed Archbishop of Tarragona on 1 October 1567. Eubel, III, p. 309.
  33. ^ "Bishop Antonio Rodríguez de Pazos y Figueroa" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 5, 2016.[self-published source?]
  34. ^ "Patriarch Bonaventura Secusio, O.F.M. Obs." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 30, 2016.[self-published source?] Secusio was appointed, Patriarch (Personal Title) of Messina
  35. ^ "Bishop Vincenzo Napoli" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved November 24, 2016.[self-published source?]
  36. ^ Los Cameros was the founder of the seminary, restored later by Bishop Galletti (1727); he was transferred to the diocese of Monreale on 16 October 1656. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 250, 270.
  37. ^ Geloso was a native of Palermo, and held the degree of master of theology. He became a Consultor of the Holy Office (Inquisition) in Palermo on 25 February 1643; he became Cantor in the Cathedral Chapter of Palermo on 2 May 1649, and subsequently was named Dean; he was appointed Vicar General of the diocese in 1669. He was presented to the diocese of Patti by the King of Spain on 18 January 1669, and received papal approval on 17 June. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Francesco Brancaccio, Bishop of Sabina, on 23 June, and died on 3 November 1669. Ritzler, V, p. 302 with note 2.
  38. ^ Maffia was born in Palermo, and was a master of theology. He was twice Provincial of the Dominican Order in Sicily, and was an Official of the Holy Office (Inquisition). He was presented to the diocese of Patti by the King of Spain on 12 December 1670, and approved by Pope Clement X on 20 April 1671. He was consecrated in Rome on 3 May 1671 by Cardinal Celio Piccolomini, Archbishop of Siena. Ritzler, V, p. 302 with note 3.
  39. ^ Bighetti: Ritzler, V, p. 302 with note 4.
  40. ^ Martinelli: Ritzler, V, p. 302 with note 5.
  41. ^ Fazio: Ritzler, V, p. 303 with note 6.
  42. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 303 with note 7.
  43. ^ Girgenti: Ritzler, V, p. 303 with note 8.
  44. ^ Algaria: Ritzler, V, p. 303 with note 9.
  45. ^ Galletti: Ritzler, V, p. 303 with note 10.
  46. ^ A native of Palermo, Bonnano taught philosophy, theology, and canon law at the seminary in Messana for 24 years. He became acting Rector of the Imperial College for Nobles in Palermo. He was nominated bishop of Patti by the Emperor on 3 March 1734, and approved by the Pope on 5 May. He was consecrated a bishop by the Archbishop of Palermo Paolo Basile, O.F.M. on 23 May 1734. On 28 June 1742 he was named Inquisitor General of the Kingdom of Sicily. He was transferred to the Archdiocese of Monreale on 28 May 1753. He died on 14 January 1754. Ritzler, VI, pp. 297, 324. with note 2.
  47. ^ Gravina: Ritzler, VI, pp. 297, 324. with note 3.
  48. ^ Mineo: Ritzler, VI, pp. 297, 324. with note 4.
  49. ^ Pisani: Ritzler, VI, pp. 297, 324. with note 5.
  50. ^ Moncada: Ritzler, VI, pp. 297, 324. with note 6.
  51. ^ After a two-year-long sede vacante, Todaro, a native of Messina, was appointed Bishop of Lipari by Pope Pius VII on 20 January 1808. He was consecrated in Messina on 7 February by Archbishop Gaetano Maria Garrasi. He was transferred to the diocese of Patti on 22 July 1816. He died on 21 April 1821. Rodriquez, p. 54.
  52. ^ Saitta was born in Bronte (diocese of Nicosia), at the western edge of the Mt. Etna lava flows, in 1768. He was named Bishop of Patti on 30 September 1834. Notizie per l'anno bissestile 1836 (in Italian). Rome: Chracas. 1836. p. 138. In the 1838 edition, the date is corrected to 1833.
  53. ^ Born in Palermo in 1814, Pietro entered the monastery of S. Martino in Palermo and took the name Michelangelo, professing his vows in 1835. In 1840 he was named a lecturer in philosophy in the monastery, and in 1843 docent in theology. In 1846 he became Prior at Messina, and in 1850 Prior at Militello; in 1850 Pope Pius IX named him Abbot of Montecassino; in 1858 he was appointed Abbot of Farfa and Procurator General of the Benedictine Order at the Roman Curia. Celesia was named Bishop of Patti on 23 March 1860, and consecrated a bishop on 15 April 1860 by Cardinal Girolamo d'Andrea; he could not enter his diocese, however, until 1866 because of the liberation movement led by Giuseppe Garibaldi. He was appointed Archbishop of Palermo on 27 October 1871, and named a cardinal by Pope Leo XIII on 10 November 1884. He died on 14 April 1904. Martin Bräuer (2014). Handbuch der Kardinäle: 1846-2012 (in German). Berlin: De Gruyter. p. 129. ISBN 978-3-11-026947-5.
  54. ^ Born in Messina in 1837, Papardo had previously been titular bishop of Mindos (Caria, Turkey). He participated in the First Vatican Council. Annuario pontificio (in Italian). Roma: Tipografia della Reverenda Camera Apostolica. 1865. p. 252.
  55. ^ Born in Salemi in the Province of Trepani (Sicily), Maragioglio was a priest of the diocese of Mazara della Valle in the suburbs of Palermo. He had been a lecturer in theology in his Order's houses. He had been Procurator General of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchins in Rome (1862–1872).
  56. ^ Born in Catania in 1966, Giombanco, after studying at the seminary in Catania, was sent to the Seminario Romano Maggiore for study at the Lateran University, where he obtained a baccalaureate in theology. He then received the degree of doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law). He became a priest in the diocese of Acireale (on the east coast of Sicily), and secretary to the Bishop and Vice-Chancellor of the diocesan Curia. He was Vicar General of the diocese of Acireale from 2012 to 2017. Il Sussidario, Appointment of Guglielmo-Giombanco-nuovo-vescovo-nominato-da-Papa-Francesco-Oggi-1-febbraio-2017-/745729/, retrieved: 2017-02-02. Giornale di Sicilia, Il papa nomina il nuovo vescovo di Patti: e Monsignor Giombanco, retrieved 2017-02-02.

SourcesEdit

Reference worksEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

AcknowledgmentEdit

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Missing or empty |title= (help)

Coordinates: 38°08′00″N 14°58′00″E / 38.1333°N 14.9667°E / 38.1333; 14.9667