Roman Catholic Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo

The Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo (Latin: Dioecesis Aliphana-Caiacensis o Caiatina) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Campania, southern Italy, created in 1986. In that year the historic Diocese of Alife was united with the Diocese of Caiazzo. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Naples.[1][2]

Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo

Dioecesis Aliphana-Caiacensis o Caiatina
Cattedrale di Alife.jpg
Alife Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceNaples
Statistics
Area580 km2 (220 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2018)
62,200 (est.)
62,000 (est.)
Parishes44
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established5th Century
CathedralCattedrale di S. Maria Assunta (Alife)
Co-cathedralConcattedrale di Maria SS. Assunta (Caiazzo)
Secular priests44 (diocesan)
6 (Religious Orders)
6 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopGiacomo Cirulli
Bishops emeritusValentino Di Cerbo
Website
www.diocesi-alife-caiazzo.it

In 2014 the diocese had one priest for every 1,104 Catholics; in 2018 the diocese had one priest for every 1,240 Catholics.

HistoryEdit

The old diocese of Alife was made up of twelve communes in the province of Caserta, Archbishopric of Benevento. The name of a Bishop of Alife appears for the first time among the signatories of the Roman Synod of 499, in the time of Pope Symmachus[3][4] Alife became a suffragan of the metropolitan archbishop of Benevento in 969, when Pope John XIII created the ecclesiastical province of Benevento.[5]

Augmentation of the dioceseEdit

On 18 February 1984, the Vatican and the Italian State signed a new and revised concordat, which was accompanied in the next year by enabling legislation. According to the agreement, the practice of having one bishop govern two separate dioceses at the same time, aeque personaliter, was abolished. Otherwise Caiazzo and Alise, who shared a bishop, might have become the diocese of Alise e Caiazzo. Instead, the Vatican continued consultations which had begun under Pope John XXIII for the merging of small dioceses, especially those with personnel and financial problems, into one combined diocese. On 30 September 1986, Pope John Paul II ordered that the dioceses of Caiazzo and Alise be merged into one diocese with one bishop, with the Latin title Dioecesis Aliphana - Caiacensis. The seat of the diocese was to be in Alise, and the cathedral of Alise was to serve as the cathedral of the merged diocese. The cathedral in Caiazzo was to become a co-cathedral, and the cathedral Chapter was to be a Capitulum Concathedralis. There was to be only one diocesan Tribunal, in Alise, and likewise one seminary, one College of Consultors, and one Priests' Council. The territory of the new diocese was to include the territory of the former dioceses of Caiazzo and Alise.[6]

Bishops of AlifeEdit

Erected: 5th Century
Metropolitan: Archdiocese of Benevento

to 1500Edit

...
  • Clarus (attested 499)[7]
...
  • Paulus (attested 982–985)[8]
...
  • Vitus (attested 1020)[9]
...
  • Rodbertus (attested 1098, 1100)[10]
...
  • Petrus (attested 1143)[11]
...
  • Balduinus (attested 1179)[12]
...
  • Landulfus (attested 1200)[13]
...
  • Alferius (1252–1254)[14]
  • Romanus (1254–after 1286)[15]
Gentilis (before Oct 1291– ? ) Administrator[16]
  • Petrus (attested 1305)[17]
  • Philippus (attested 1308)[16]
  • Nicolaus
  • Thomas (1346– )[18]
  • Bertrandus
  • Joannes (1361– ? )[19]
  • Guilelmus
  • Joannes (Alfieri) (1389–1412) Roman Obedience[20]
  • Angelus de S. Felice (1413– )[21]
  • Antonius Moretti, O.P. (1458–1482)[22]
  • Joannes Bartolo (Bartolomaeus) (1482–1486)
  • Giovanni Zefra (6 Sep 1486 - 1504 Died)[23]

Since 1500Edit

Bishops of Alife-CaiazzoEdit

United: 30 September 1986 with the Diocese of Caiazzo
Latin Name: Aliphanus-Caiacensis o Caiatinus

  • Nicola Comparone (10 December 1990 - 5 January 1998 Died)
  • Pietro Farina (16 February 1999 - 25 April 2009 Appointed, Bishop of Caserta)
  • Valentino Di Cerbo (6 March 2010 - 30 April 2019 Retired)
  • Giacomo Cirulli (26 February 2021 - present)

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 9, 2016.[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Diocese of Alife-Caiazzo GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved March 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  3. ^ Clarus episcopus Ecclesiœ Allifanœ subscripsi); see "Monumenta Germaniæ Historica," Auctorum Antiquissimorum Tomus XII (Berlin: Weidmann 1894), p. 406. Bishop Clarus signs seventh, suggesting great seniority in office.
  4. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  5. ^ Cappelletti, p. 90.
  6. ^ Acta Apostolicae Sedis 79 (Città del Vaticano 1987), pp. 631-633.
  7. ^ Bishop Clarus was present at the Roman synod of Pope Symmachus in 499. J.-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus VIII (Florence: A. Zatta 1762), p. 234. Francesco Lanzoni (1927), Le diocesi d'Italia dalle origini al principio del secolo VII (an. 604). Faenza: F. Lega, p. 378.
  8. ^ Gams, p. 847, column 1.
  9. ^ Gams, p. 847, column 1. Cappelletti, pp. 91-104.
  10. ^ In his documents his name is also spelled Robbertus. Erasmo Gattola (1733). Historia abbatiae Cassinensis (in Latin). Pars prima. Venice: Sebastian Coleti. pp. 44–45, 49–50. Cappelletti, p. 105. Gams, p. 847. Kehr IX, p. 114.
  11. ^ Kehr, p. 114.
  12. ^ Bishop Baldwin was present at the Third Lateran Council of Pope Alexander III in March 1179. Ughelli, p. 208. J.-D. Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII (Venice: A. Zatta 1778), p. 460. Cappelletti, p. 106.
  13. ^ Cappelletti, p. 106. Eubel I, p. 84 with note 1.
  14. ^ Alferius was appointed by Pope Innocent IV on 27 April 1252. He was transferred to the diocese of Viterbo on 27 January 1254. Eubel I, p. 84, 532.
  15. ^ Fr. Romanus was the sub-Prior of the convent of the Dominicans in Rome (the Minerva? Santa Sabina?) had to be ordered by Pope Innocent IV, in a letter of 28 March 1254, to take up the office to which he had been elected by the Church of Alife. Romanus' choice as bishop may have happened as early as the end of January. He was ordered to be consecrated a bishop by Pope Innocent on 2 April 1254, by the Archbishop of Corinth, assisted by the bishops of Viterbo and Cefalù. He was still in office in 1286. E. Berger, Les registres d'Innocent IV Tome troisième (Paris: Fontemoing 1897), p. 392, no. 7409; p. 396, no. 7424. Eubel I, p. 84.
  16. ^ a b Eubel I, p. 84.
  17. ^ Petrus: Ughelli, p. 242. Eubel I, p. 84.
  18. ^ Thomas was confirmed by Pope Innocent VI on 8 March 1346. Eubel I, p. 84.
  19. ^ Joannes had been Archdeacon of Alife. Eubel I, p. 84.
  20. ^ Joannes was appointed Bishop of Alife by Urban VI on 10 May 1389. Eubel I, p. 84.
  21. ^ Angelus was appointed by John XXIII on 13 February 1413. Eubel I, p. 84.
  22. ^ Eubel, Hierarchia catholica II, p. 85.
  23. ^ "Bishop Giovanni Zefra" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  24. ^ "Bishop Angelo Sacco" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  25. ^ "Bishop Ippolito Marsigli" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  26. ^ "Bishop Diego Gilberto Nogueras" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  27. ^ "Bishop Angelo Rossi" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  28. ^ "Bishop Giovanni Battista Santorio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 29, 2016
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol IV. p. 78.
  30. ^ "Bishop Modesto Gavazzi, O.F.M. Conv." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  31. ^ "Bishop Pietro Paolo Medici" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 20, 2017
  32. ^ "Bishop Henri Borghi, O.S.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016
  33. ^ "Bishop Domenico Caracciolo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved September 25, 2016
  34. ^ "Vescovi alifani dal XVII al XX secolo". Associazione Storica del Medio Volturno (in Italian). Retrieved 9 May 2020.

BibliographyEdit

Reference worksEdit

StudiesEdit

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Missing or empty |title= (help)

Coordinates: 41°19′44″N 14°19′44″E / 41.3289°N 14.3289°E / 41.3289; 14.3289