Roman Catholic Diocese of Acerra

The Diocese of Acerra (Latin: Dioecesis Acerrarum) is a Roman Catholic ecclesiastical territory in Campania, southern Italy, eight miles east of Naples, in the area once called Terra Laboris (Liburia).[1] It has existed since the 11th century.[2] It is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Naples.[3][4]

Archdiocese of Acerra

Dioecesis Acerrarum
Cattedrale Acerra.jpg
Acerra Cathedral
Location
CountryItaly
Ecclesiastical provinceNaples
Statistics
Area157 km2 (61 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2015)
125,657
121,810 (96.9%)
Parishes28
Information
DenominationCatholic Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established11th Century
CathedralCattedrale di S. Maria Assunta
Patron saintAlphonsus Liguori
Conon
Secular priests36 (diocesan)
14 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopAntonio Di Donna
Website
www.diocesiacerra.it

The diocese has one priest for every 2,436 Catholics.

History of the dioceseEdit

The cathedral of Acerra was originally dedicated to Saint Michael the Archangel.[1]

The cathedral was administered and served by a Chapter, composed of three dignities (the Archpriest, the Cantor, and the Primicerius) and fifteen Canons.[5]

In 1818, a new concordat with the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies committed the pope to the suppression of more than fifty small dioceses in the kingdom. The ecclesiastical province of Naples was spared from any suppressions, but the diocese of Sant' Agata de' Goti, which had not had a bishop in two decades, and the diocese of Acerra, which was very small in territory, population, and income, came under scrutiny. Pope Pius VII, in the bull "De Utiliori" of 27 June 1818, chose to unite the two dioceses under the leadership of one bishop, aeque principaliter.[6] In the same concordat, the King was confirmed in the right to nominate candidates for vacant bishoprics, subject to the approval of the pope. That situation persisted down until the final overthrow of the Bourbon monarchy in 1860.[7]

In a bull of 30 November 1854, Pope Pius IX separated the diocese of Acerra and the diocese of S. Agata de' Goti, which had been joined under one bishop since 1818. In the bull, Pope Pius also transferred four communes from S. Agata to Acerra: Arienzo, San Felice, S. Maria a Vico, and Cervino and the farm of Forchia.[8]

Along with the separation of the two dioceses and the redrawing of diocesan boundaries, Pope Pius granted the diocese of Acerra the use of the former Dominican house in S. Maria a Vico for its seminary. The new seminary had its formal inauguration on 15 June 1857.[9]

Bishops of AcerraEdit

Through 1500Edit

...
  • Girardo (attested 1098, 1114)[10]
  • Ignotus (attested 1139)[11]
...
  • Bartolomeo (attested 1179)[12]
...
  • Romanus (12th cent.)[13]
...
  • Gentile (1242–?)
...
  • Tommaso (1284–1302)
...
[Pietro, O.F.M. (1331)][16]

1500 to 1700Edit

Gianvincenzo Carafa (1535–1539) Administrator[34]
Paulus Riccardus Aversanus (1554) Bishop-elect[36]

1700 to presentEdit

  • Benito Noriega, O.F.M. (28 May 1700 – Mar 1708 Died)[43]
  • Giuseppe Maria Positano, O.P. (1717–1723)[44]
  • Domenico Antonio Berretti (11 Jun 1725 – 16 Apr 1761 Died)[43]
  • Ciro degli Altieri (1761–1775)[45]
  • Gennaro Giordano (20 May 1776 – Feb 1789 Died)[46]
  • Gian Leonardo Maria Di Fusco, O.P. (27 Feb 1792 – 1795 Died)[47]
  • Orazio Magliola (18 Dec 1797 – 3 Jan 1829 Died)[48]
  • Emanuele Maria Bellorado, O.P. (18 May 1829 – 29 Oct 1833 Died)[49]
  • Taddeo Garzilli (Garzillo) (20 Jan 1834 – 5 Mar 1848 Died)[50]
  • Francesco Javarone (1849–1854)[51]
  • Giuseppe Gennaro Romano (23 Mar 1855 – 26 Mar 1864 Died)
  • Giacinto Magliuolo (23 Feb 1872 – 1899 Died)
  • Francesco De Pietro (14 Dec 1899 – 28 Jan 1932 Retired)[52]
  • Nicola Capasso (13 Mar 1933 – 16 Feb 1966 Retired)
  • Antonio Riboldi, I.C. (25 Jan 1978 – 7 Dec 1999 Retired)[53]
  • Salvatore Giovanni Rinaldi (7 Dec 1999 – 18 Sep 2013 Retired)[54]
  • Antonio Di Donna (18 Sep 2013 – )[55]

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Ughelli, p. 216.
  2. ^ Kehr, p. 476: "Revera episcopatus non prius quam saec. XI med. erectus fuisse videtur eodem fere tempore, quo Nicolaus II a. 1059 Oderisium monachum et postea abbatem Casinensem apud Acerras diaconum cardinalem ordinavit."
  3. ^ "Diocese of Acerra" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  4. ^ "Diocese of Acerra" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016.[self-published source]
  5. ^ Ughelli, p. 216. D'Avino, p. 7 column 2.
  6. ^ Bullarii Romani continuatio, Summorum Pontificum Clementis XIII, Clementis XIV, Pii VI, Pii VII, Leonis XII Gregorii XVI constitutiones... (in Latin). Tomus decimus quintus (15). Rome: typographia Reverendae Camerae Apostolicae. 1853. pp. 9, 57 § 4. "Praedictam autem ecclesiam Acerrarum aeque principaliter perpetuo unimus , ut infra, alteri episcopali ecclesiae sanclae Agathae Gothorum."
  7. ^ Bullarii Romani continuatio Tomus 15, p. 7 column 1, "Articulus XXVIII".
  8. ^ Giosafat Ruggiero (1857). In occasione che i seminaristi della città e diocesi di Acerra nel dì 15 giugno corrente anno 1857 facevano il primo ingresso nel novello seminario di Santa Maria a Vico (in Italian). Napoli: stab. tipografico Vico de' Ss. Filippo e Giacomo. p. 6. Cappelletti, p. 546, gives the date of 1855, which is the year in which the formal separation was carried into effect. A new bishop was appointed for S. Agata de' Goti on 23 March 1855: Gams, p. 846 column 1.
  9. ^ Ruggiero, p. 6.
  10. ^ Gaetano Caporale (1885). Il martirio e culto dei santi Conone e figlio protettori della città di Acerra (in Italian and Latin). Naples: Tip. del Lampo. pp. LXV–LXVI, no. 4. P. Kehr, Italia pontificia VIII, p. 476.
  11. ^ The unnamed bishop of Acerra was deposed by Pope Innocent II at the Second Lateran Council in 1139, because he had been an adherent of Pope Anacletus II in the schism of 1130. Kehr, p. 477, no. 1.
  12. ^ Bishop Bartholomaeus was present at the Third Lateran Council of Pope Alexander III in March 1179. J. D. Mansi, Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio, editio novissima, Tomus XXII, p. 460. Kehr, p. 476.
  13. ^ Romanus: Ughelli, p. 217. Cappelletti, p. 539.
  14. ^ Guilelmus: Ughelli, p. 219. Eubel I, p. 69.
  15. ^ Spanus: Eubel I, p. 69, ex schedis Garampi ('from the notes of [Cardinal] Garampi').
  16. ^ Petrus was Bishop of Acerno, not Bishop of Acerra: Eubel I, p. 69, note 2, correcting Gams, p. 844.
  17. ^ Giovanni was transferred to the diocese of Bagnoregio by Pope Clement VI on 20 December 1342. Eubel I, pp. 69, 126.
  18. ^ Matteo di Castro Petri had been Bishop of Bagnoregio (1328–1342). He was transferred to Acerra on 20 December 1342. He died in 1344. Ughelli, p. 219. Cappelletti, p. 541. Eubel I, pp. 69, 126.
  19. ^ Enrico was a native of Sicily, and was a doctor of the University of Paris. He was appointed Bishop of Acerra by Pope Clement VI on 27 May 1344. He died in 1348. Ughelli, p. 219. Cappelletti, p. 541. Eubel I, pp. 69.
  20. ^ Raineri had been Cantor in the cathedral Chapter of Acerra. He was appointed Bishop of Acerra by Pope Clement VI on 27 October 1348. Ughelli, p. 219. Cappelletti, p. 541. Eubel I, pp. 69. Daniel Williman, The Right of Spoil of the Popes of Avignon, 1316-1415 (1988), p. 232.
  21. ^ Joannes was appointed by Pope Urban V on 6 March 1363. According to Ughelli, p. 219, he was still in office in 1394. Eubel I, p. 69.
  22. ^ Tommaso was appointed by Pope Boniface IX (Roman Obedience) on 12 December 1394. He died in 1403. Ughelli, p. 219. Eubel I, p. 69.
  23. ^ Angelo had been a Canon of the cathedral of Naples. Eubel Hierarchia catholica I, p. 69. (in Latin)
  24. ^ "Bishop Angelo de Consilio" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved January 4, 2017.[self-published source]
  25. ^ Filippo had been Archpriest of the cathedral Chapter. He was appointed Bishop of Acerra by Pope Martin V on 18 May 1429. He died in 1434, before September. Eubel I, p. 69; II, p. 79.
  26. ^ Nicolas was appointed on 6 September 1434 by Pope Eugenius IV. Ughelli, p. 219. Cappelletti, p. 541. Eubel II, p. 79 (who registers only one Nicolas, and has his term run from 1434 to 1451).
  27. ^ Ughelli, p. 219, who states that Descari resigned voluntarily in 1451. Cappelletti, p. 541. Eubel II, p. 79 (who registers only one Nicolas, and has his term run from 1434 to 1451).
  28. ^ Beltrandus had been a Canon of Naples. He was appointed Bishop of Acerra on 5 April 1451, and died the following year. Ughelli, p. 219-220.
  29. ^ Cortese was appointed on 2 October 1452. Eubel II, p. 79.
  30. ^ "Bishop Leone Cortese" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 27, 2017.[self-published source]
  31. ^ De Noya had been Bishop of Minervino (1492–1497). He was transferred to the diocese of Acerra on 15 March 1497 by Pope Alexander VI. He resigned in 1504 and was named titular Archbishop of Naxos on 15 April 1504. He died in 1515. Ughelli, p. 220 (wrongly writing Paros for Naxos). Cappelletti, p. 542, wrongly states that De Noya was made Archbishop of Bari. Eubel, Hierarchia catholica II, pp. 79, 193; III, p. 93, 254.
  32. ^ Nicolaus was appointed by Pope Julius II on 15 April 1504. He died in 1511. Eubel III, p. 93.
  33. ^ Vincenzo was a native and a Canon of Sarno. He was appointed Bishop of Acerra on 22 August 1511, but died before he had completed one year of service. Ughelli, p. 220. Eubel III, p. 93.
  34. ^ Carafa was appointed Administrator of the diocese of Acerra on the nomination of the Emperor Charles V. He resigned on the appointment of Bishop Pietro Paolo de Thisis on 21 April 1539. He was elected pope on 23 May 1555, and died on18 August 1559. Eubel III, p. 93, with note 6.
  35. ^ Pietro Paolo de Thisis (as he is named in the Acta Cameralia which record his appointment) was appointed Bishop of Acerra on 21 April 1539. He had previously been a Referendary of the Tribunal of the Two Signatures in the Roman Curia. He died in 1554, and his successor Paulus Riccardus of Aversa was named; Paulus Riccardus, however, died before his consecration. Ughelli, p. 220 (who calls him Joannes Paulus de Pisis, de Titiis). Cappelletti, p. 542 (who reports the date of appointment as 14 April 1539). Eubel III, p. 93.
  36. ^ Paulus Riccardus of Aversa was named; Paulus Riccardus, however, died in 1554, according to his tombstone, before his consecration. He is called Episcopus electus. Ughelli, p. 220-221. Cappelletti, pp. 542-543.
  37. ^ Sanseverino was appointed, on the nomination of Philip II, King of Naples, on 6 July 1555 (Ughelli, p. 221) or 6 July 1556 (Lucentius, Gams, and Eubel). He died or resigned in 1560 (according to Lucentius in Ughelli, 221). Eubel III, p. 93.
  38. ^ Giovanni Fabrizio Sanseverino was appointed Bishop of Acerra on 13 March 1560 (or 14 February 1560, according to Ughelli, p.221). He was transferred to the diocese of Trivento on 23 July 1568 by Pope Pius IV. He died in 1582. Cappelletti, p. 543. Eubel III, pp. 93, 319.
  39. ^ Cappelletti, p. 543. Eubel III, pp. 93.
  40. ^ A Neapolitan patrician, Scipione was the brother of Tommaso Salernitano, the Regent of the Royal Chancery of King Philip II as King of Naples. He was appointed Bishop of Acerra on 16 July 1571. He died in 1581. Ughelli, p. 221. Eubel III, p. 93.
  41. ^ Majorana was a member of the Theatine Order. He had been Bishop of Crotone (1578–1581). He was an expert in rites and rituals. He was nominated by King Philip II to the diocese of Acerra, and transferred to that See by Pope Gregory XIII on 13 November 1581. He died on 13 November 1586. Ughelli, p. 222. Eubel III, p. 93.
  42. ^ a b c Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 66.
  43. ^ a b c Ritzler and Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 67. (in Latin)
  44. ^ Positano was appointed Bishop of Acerra on 22 November 1717 by Pope Clement XI. On 27 September 1723 he was transferred to the diocese of Acerenza e Matera by Pope Innocent XIII. He died on 14 March 1730. Ritzler-Sefrin V, p. 67.
  45. ^ Born in Naples in 1694, Altieri held the degree of doctor in utroque iure (Naples 1714) at the age of twenty. He was a Canon of the cathedral Chapter of Naples. Altieri became Bishop of Monopoli (1754–1761). He was nominated Bishop of Acerra by the King of Naples on 14 March 1761, and transferred to the diocese of Acerra by Pope Clement XIII on 6 April 1761. He was acknowledged to have strong Jansenist leanings. He died in Naples on 13 October 1775. Cappelletti, pp. 545-546. Ritzler and Sefrin, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 63 with note 2.
  46. ^ Ritzler and Sefrin VI, p. 63 with note 3.
  47. ^ Ritzler and Sefrin VI, p. 63 with note 4.
  48. ^ Memorie istoriche della città di S. Agata de' Goti per l'epoca dal principio dell'era volgare sino al 1840 (in Italian). Napoli: presso M. Avallone. 1841. pp. 108–109. Ritzler and Sefrin VI, p. 63 with note 5.
  49. ^ Memorie istoriche della città di S. Agata de' Goti per l'epoca dal principio dell'era volgare sino al 1840. pp. 110–111.
  50. ^ Memorie istoriche della città di S. Agata de' Goti per l'epoca dal principio dell'era volgare sino al 1840. pp. 111–112.
  51. ^ Javarone was born in Naples in 1788. He was professor of dogmatic theology in the royal university in Naples from 1817. From 1812 to 1832 he was one of the scholars working on the transcription and publication of the Herculanium papyri. In 1827, he was co-editor of the third volume of Herculanensia volumina, which included Philodemus' "De poematis" and a portion of "On virtues and vices". On 2 July 1832, he was named Bishop of Ascoli and Carignola. On 20 April 1849, he was transferred by Pope Pius IX to the diocese of Acerra e S. Agata de' Goti. He died on 19 August 1854. Notizie per l'anno 1837 (in Italian). Roma: Cracas. 1837. p. 85. G. Castaldi, Della regale accademia Ercolanese (Naples 1840), pp. 177-180. G. De Luca, "Monsignor Francesco Iavarone," Annali civili del Regno delle due Sicilie 109 (1855), pp. 69-70. Cappelletti, p. 546.
  52. ^ "Bishop Francesco De Pietro". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney.[self-published source]
  53. ^ "Bishop Antonio Riboldi". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney.[self-published source]
  54. ^ "Bishop Salvatore Giovanni Rinaldi". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney.[self-published source]
  55. ^ CV of Bishop Di Donna: Diocesi di Acerra, "Vescovo: Sua Ecc. Mons. Antonio Di Donna"; retrieved 29 August 2019. (in Italian)

BibliographyEdit

Reference worksEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 40°57′00″N 14°22′00″E / 40.9500°N 14.3667°E / 40.9500; 14.3667