Robert Eaglestone

Robert Eaglestone (born 1968) is a British literary critic and theorist. He is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought in the Department of English at Royal Holloway, University of London. He works on contemporary literature, literary theory and contemporary European philosophy, and on Holocaust and Genocide studies. He edits the Routledge Critical Thinkers,[1] series.

Professor

Robert Eaglestone
Born1968 (1968) (age 53)
OccupationProfessor of Contemporary Literature and Thought
OrganizationRoyal Holloway, University of London
Known forliterary theory, contemporary fiction, ethics
Notable work
Doing English: A Guide for Literature Students, The Holocaust and the Postmodern
AwardsNational Teaching Fellow

In 2014, Eaglestone was the recipient of a National Teaching Fellowship, among the highest awards for pedagogy at university level in the United Kingdom.[2] He was elected a fellow of the English Association in 2017.[3]

He is a media commentator[4] [5] and reviewer.[6]

Academic ResearchEdit

Eaglestone has published a number of books on fiction and the relationship between literature, ethics and history, Ethical Criticism: Reading After Levinas (1997), The Holocaust and the Postmodern (2004),[7] The Broken Voice: Reading Post-Holocaust Literature (2017) [8] and articles on Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, Hannah Arendt and Jacques Derrida. He has also edited books on Salman Rushdie, J.M. Coetzee and on contemporary literature.

Eaglestone is also the author of a textbook, Doing English: a Guide for Literature Students (4th ed 2017) (US edition: Studying Literature). He has written about textbooks for AdvanceHE.[9]

Eaglestone edited a book on Brexit, Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses (2018), stating that Brexit is "a political, economic and administrative event: and it is a cultural one, too".[10] He coined the term 'cruel nostalgia' [11] in this context.

Eaglestone is concerned with the condition of literature studies: on this, he published Literature: Why it matters (2019) and a co-edited collection with Gail Marshall English: Shared Futures (2018).

Eaglestone is a commentator in the national press on the study on literature[12] at school and in Higher Education. [13] In English and its teachers: a history of Policy, Pedagogy and Practice, Simon Gibbons writes that "Eaglestone was not simply an ivory-towered academic seeking to shore up his own position - he had consistently demonstrated his commitment to effective teaching in secondary schools". [14]

Eaglestone is married to Poppy Corbettand lives in Streatham, London. He has two children from his first marriage.

Published booksEdit

  • Literature: Why it matters (Cambridge: Polity, 2019)
  • The Broken Voice: Reading Post-Holocaust Literature (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • Contemporary Fiction: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013)
  • Doing English: A Guide for Literature Students fourth revised edition (London: Routledge, 2017, ISBN 978-0415496742) Japanese translation 2003. Arabic translation 2013.
  • The Holocaust and the Postmodern (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004, ISBN 978-0199239375). Japanese translation 2013.
  • Postmodernism and Holocaust Denial (Cambridge: Icon Books, 2001). Slovak translation, 2001; Turkish Translation, 2002; Japanese Translation 2004; Greek translation 2013.
  • Doing English: A Guide for Literature Students (London: Routledge, 1999).
  • Ethical Criticism: Reading After Levinas (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997, ISBN 978-0748609550)

As editor and co-editorEdit

  • with Dan O'Gorman The Routledge Companion to Twenty First Century Literary Fiction (London: Routledge, 2019)
  • with Gail Marshall English: Shared Futures;; (English Association Essays and Studies, Boydell and Brewer, 2018)
  • Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses (London: Routledge, 2018)
  • with Gert Buelens and Sam Durrant The Future of Trauma Theory: Contemporary Literary and Cultural Criticism (London: Routledge, 2013)
  • with Martin MacQuillan, Salman Rushdie: Bloomsbury Contemporary Critical Perspectives (London: Bloomsbury, 2013)
  • Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Literary and Cultural Theory Volume 2 (1966 to Present day) (Oxford: Blackwell, 2010).
  • with Elleke Boehmer and Katy Iddiols J.M. Coetzee in Context and Theory (London: Continuum, 2009)
  • with Simon Glendinning, Derrida's Legacies: Literature and Philosophy (London: Routledge, 2008)
  • with Barry Langford Teaching Holocaust Literature and Film (London: Palgrave, 2008)
  • Reading The Lord of the Rings (London: Continuum, 2005)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Renfrew, Alastair. "Critical Thinkers (Book Series)". Routledge. Retrieved 2014-02-17. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ Grove, Jack (2014-06-12). "National Teaching Fellows announced". Times Higher Education. TLS Group. Retrieved 2015-12-31. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ name="English Assiociation Fellows">"English Association Fellows". Leicester University English Association. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "In Our Time - Hannah Arendt". BBC Radio 4. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Great Lives - Elie Wiesel". BBC Radio 4. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "Author Robert Eaglestone". Times Higher Education. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "The Holocaust and the Postmodern". University Press Scholarship Online. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "The Broken Voice: Reading Post Holocaust Literature". University Press Scholarship Online. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Textbook Cinderellas: how metacognition takes a worn format to the ball". AdvanceHE. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "Brexit and Literature: Critical and Cultural Responses". Routledge. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "Brexit and Literature: a year from Article 50". Backdoor Broadcasting Company - Academic Podcasts. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "English A-level suffers collapse in student numbers as teachers blame tougher GCSEs". 14 August 2019. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ Fernando Gil Díaz (2013-10-31). "English: why the discipline may not be 'too big to fail'". Times Higher Education. Retrieved 2014-02-17. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ Simon Gibbons, English and its teachers: a history of Policy, Pedagogy and Practice. London: Routledge. 2017. p. 119. ISBN 9781138948938. Retrieved 27 October 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)