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Ripley is a city in Lauderdale County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 7,844 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of Lauderdale County.[6] The current Mayor is Jon Pavletic. The current County Mayor is Maurice Gaines.

Ripley, Tennessee
City Square in Ripley, September 2013
City Square in Ripley, September 2013
Motto(s): 
"Come see what's growing on"
Location of Ripley in Lauderdale County, Tennessee.
Location of Ripley in Lauderdale County, Tennessee.
Coordinates: 35°44′35″N 89°32′2″W / 35.74306°N 89.53389°W / 35.74306; -89.53389Coordinates: 35°44′35″N 89°32′2″W / 35.74306°N 89.53389°W / 35.74306; -89.53389
CountryUnited States
StateTennessee
CountyLauderdale
Founded1836[1]
Incorporated1838[1]
Named forEleazer Ripley[2]
Area
 • Total12.8 sq mi (33.3 km2)
 • Land12.8 sq mi (33.2 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.1 km2)
Elevation
446 ft (136 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total8,445
 • Estimate 
(2018)[3]
7,879
 • Density612.3/sq mi (236.4/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
38063
Area code(s)731
FIPS code47-63340[4]
GNIS feature ID1299470[5]
Websitewww.ripleytenn.com

Contents

GeographyEdit

Ripley is located at 35°44′35″N 89°32′2″W / 35.74306°N 89.53389°W / 35.74306; -89.53389 (35.743115, −89.533872).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 12.9 square miles (33 km2), of which 12.8 square miles (33 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) (0.31%) is water.

Ripley is located on the southeastern edge of the New Madrid Seismic Zone, an area with a high earthquake risk.

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1870532
1880353−33.6%
189068293.2%
19001,640140.5%
19102,01122.6%
19202,0702.9%
19302,33012.6%
19402,78419.5%
19503,31819.2%
19603,78214.0%
19704,79426.8%
19806,36632.8%
19906,188−2.8%
20007,84426.8%
20108,4457.7%
Est. 20187,879[3]−6.7%
Sources:[8][9]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 7,844 people, 3,142 households, and 2,054 families residing in the city. The population density was 612.3 people per square mile (236.4/km²). There were 3,397 housing units at an average density of 265.2 per square mile (102.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 51.56% White, 46.81% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.27% Asian, 0.38% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.07% of the population.

There were 3,142 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.1% were married couples living together, 23.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.6% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city, the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 11.0% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $23,662, and the median income for a family was $34,183. Males had a median income of $31,321 versus $20,661 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,710. About 22.1% of families and 27.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 38.1% of those under age 18 and 27.5% of those age 65 or over.

CultureEdit

SchoolsEdit

  • Ripley Middle School
  • Ripley Primary School
  • Ripley Elementary School
  • Ripley High School
  • Abundant Life Christian School
  • First Apostolic Academy
  • Gateway Christian School
  • Tennessee Technology Center-Ripley
  • University of Tennessee-Martin, Ripley Campus

In 2009, Ripley appeared on Newsmax magazine's list of the "Top 25 Most Uniquely American Cities and Towns," a piece written by current CBS News travel editor Peter Greenberg. In determining his ranking, Greenberg cited the city's extensive involvement in the National Defense University program. According to the article, Ripley is one of the first stops for military students in the program and is also "the only site where students stay with families and are immersed in the American lifestyle."[10]

ChurchesEdit

  • Whitefield Assembly of God
  • Maranatha Baptist Church
  • Victory Baptist Church
  • Asbury United Methodist Church
  • Ave Maria Catholic Church
  • Calvary Hill Baptist Church
  • Curve Baptist Church
  • First Apostolic Church
  • First Assembly of God
  • First Baptist Church
  • First United Methodist Church
  • Grace Baptist Church
  • Holly Grove Baptist Church
  • Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses
  • Mary's Chapel Baptist Church
  • New Beginnings Christian Center
  • Walnut Grove Baptist Church
  • Whitefield Assembly of God
  • Immanuel Episcopal Church
  • Macedonia Baptist Church
  • Ripley Church of God
  • Ripley Church of Christ
  • Spiller Hill Church of God In Christ
  • Gospel Rock Holiness Church
  • Olive Branch Baptist Church
  • Spirit of Deliverance Ministries
  • Lightfoot Methodist Church
  • Abundant Life Assembly of God
  • Central Community Church
  • Elam Baptist Church

Recreation and fitnessEdit

Ripley parks and recreationEdit

Ripley Park, also known as Ripley Pool and Waterslide, is located at 200 Mary Robert. Its facilities include: pool with water slide, playground equipment, seven pavilions that require reservations, grills, 4 athletic field complex, 4 state of the art tennis courts, 1.1 mile walking trail, large grassy areas parking, restrooms, and the park office.

W.G.L. Rice Park is located south of Downtown Ripley, Tennessee. The park has a baseball/softball field, soccer field, tennis court, basketball court, two playgrounds, and a partial walking trail. Rice Park is the oldest city park in Ripley. The land for the park was donated in the early 1900s through a gift by the Rice Family and is noted for its historic Labor Day Celebration.

Downtown revitalizationEdit

As one of the six cities selected in Tennessee for downtown revitalization, extensive work is being done around the town square and adjacent areas. Work began in the fall of 2008 and the courthouse square was completed in May 2010.

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Paul Hellman, Historical Gazetteer of the United States (Taylor and Francis, 2005), p. 1025.
  2. ^ Nancy Capace, Encyclopedia of Tennessee (North American Book Distributors, 2000), p. 214.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  8. ^ "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-03-04.
  9. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 11 June 2013. Retrieved 11 December 2013.
  10. ^ Greenberg, Peter. "Newsmax Magazine Rates the Top 25 Most Uniquely American Cities And Towns". Retrieved 16 January 2014.

External linksEdit