Rio Karma

The Rio Karma is a digital audio player originally made by the now-defunct Rio. It was released in August 2003. It measures 2.7 × 3 × 0.9 inches (6.9 × 7.6 × 2.3 cm) and weighs 5.5 ounces (160 grams). It has a 20 gigabyte (18.6 gibibyte) hard drive. The Karma is notable for its support of Ogg Vorbis and FLAC playback in addition to the usual MP3 and WMA formats, however it will not play MP2 format. It also bears the distinction of supporting file transfers via Ethernet through its docking station, as well as the standard USB 2.0. It is not supported as a plug and play removable drive, although the program Rio Taxi does allow any data to be stored. Like many Rio players, the Karma's firmware features a 5-band parametric equalizer, cross-fader, true gapless playback, animated menus, dynamic playlist generation and visualizations.

Rio Karma
RioKarma.jpg
ManufacturerRio
TypePortable media player
Lifespan2003-2005
Storage20 GB hard drive
Displaybacklit monochrome display
Input4-way directional pad, scroll wheel, three buttons
ConnectivityUSB 2.0, Ethernet
Docking station, front
Docking station, back

Karma SettingsEdit

Playback ScreenEdit

The Karma has three options for what is displayed on the play screen

  • Progress Indicator
  • Profile Indicator
  • VU Meter for left and right channels.

LanguageEdit

Options include English (US), English (UK), German, French, Japanese, Chinese & Spanish.

Dock SettingsEdit

For docking, there are four options for the "cradle glow".

  • Static, with glow level setting
  • Pulse with timecode
  • Pulse while charging
  • Pulse to music

OrientationEdit

The player can be configured for right-handed or left-handed use. For left-handed use, the screen is inverted.

ModificationsEdit

The player uses a 20GB Hitachi Travelstar 1.8" hard drive. It is possible to install a higher data capacity hard drive, commonly 30, 40, or 60GB, though these may be physically larger, requiring case modifications. It is also possible to swap the hard drive for CompactFlash-based storage, as it shares the original IDE drive's signaling pinout.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit