Riichiro Inagaki

Riichiro Inagaki (Japanese: 稲垣 理一郎, Hepburn: Inagaki Riichirō, born June 20, 1976) is a Japanese manga writer from Tokyo. He started his career in 2001 publishing works for Shogakukan's magazine Big Comic Spirits. After three one-shots, he moved to Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump, in which he started the work he is best known for, Eyeshield 21. In collaboration with the artist Yusuke Murata, Eyeshield 21 was serialized between July 2002 and June 2009 in Weekly Shōnen Jump. Between 2010 and 2015, Inagaki collaborated with several artists, including Bonjae, Katsunori Matsui, and Ryoichi Ikegami, and published one-shots in different magazines. He started a new serial titled Dr. Stone in Weekly Shōnen Jump in 2017 in collaboration with Boichi.

Riichiro Inagaki
稲垣 理一郎
Born (1976-06-20) June 20, 1976 (age 44)
Tokyo, Japan
NationalityJapanese
Area(s)Manga author
Notable works
Eyeshield 21
Dr. Stone
AwardsShogakukan Manga Award (2019)

BiographyEdit

Born on June 20, 1976, in Tokyo,[1] Inagaki started to like manga when he read Fujiko Fujio's Manga Michi in middle school.[2] In 1994, he competed at the third Manga Kōshien, a high school manga contest based in Kōchi Prefecture.[3] As it only demanded a one-panel story, Inagaki just threw some ink on the paper to look like he had messed up the story. He said, "People really liked that for some reason. But Manga Koshien isn't something I'm so fond of remembering".[4] After finishing school, he enrolled in a manga and film production company as animation assistant.[5] He started his career as professional manga writer by publishing works in Shogakukan's Big Comic Spirits.[6] He debuted in October 2001 with Nandodemo Roku Gatsu Jū San Hi,[7] and also wrote for the magazine Square Freeze and Love Love Santa, published in November 2001 and in February 2002 respectively.[8][9] He later moved to Shueisha's Weekly Shōnen Jump, in which he won the 7th "Story King" award for a storyboard of Eyeshield 21.[1][10]

When he planned to create Eyeshield 21, the editorial department asked if he wanted to both write and draw the series, but Inagaki felt he was "so rookie".[11] So he asked Yusuke Murata to be the illustrator.[10] In 2002, they published two one-shots called Eyeshield Part 1 (前編, Zenpen) and Part 2 (後編, Kōhen) on March 5 and 12 in Weekly Shōnen Jump.[12][13][14] The series began to be regularly published on July 23 of the same year in the same magazine,[15] and spanned 333 chapters, the last one being published on June 15, 2009.[16] Collected in 37 volumes by Shueisha,[17][18] the series became his most known work.[19] It has sold more than 20 million copies in Japan,[20] has been published in seven countries, including in the United States,[a] and gained an anime adaptation that aired for 145 episodes from April 2005 to March 2008 on TV Tokyo.[30][31] For the release of Eyeshield 21 anime he created the Kome Studio, a company of copyright management to ensure the right of the original creators of manga.[32] The company name, which translates to "rice", was chosen for three reasons: 1) because "Inagaki" contains a kanji ("稲") that can be translated to rice; 2) because "rice" kanji ("米") is also used to represent the United States; and 3) because of the Rice Bowl, an American football championship in Japan.[4][32]

In 2006, he was chosen, along with Akira Toriyama and Eiichiro Oda, to be a committee member for the Tezuka Award.[33] In June 2010, he published Kiba&Kiba in Weekly Shōnen Jump along with Bonjae,[34] and his collaboration work with Katsunori Matsui, Shinpai Kato No Face, was published in the 2011 first issue of Weekly Young Jump.[35] He published another collaborative work with Matsui, Alpha Centauri Dōbutsuen; a two-chapter series, it was published on January 10 and February 10, 2014 in the Jump X magazine.[4][36] Along with Ryoichi Ikegami, he published the one-shot Kobushi Zamurai in Shogakukan's Big Comic Superior on August 12, 2015.[37]

On March 6, 2017, he started to serialize Dr. Stone in Weekly Shōnen Jump with collaboration of illustrator Boichi.[38] In January 2019, Dr. Stone was elected the best shōnen manga of 2018 at the 64th Shogakukan Manga Awards.[39] Nineteen volumes of Dr. Stone have been released by Shueisha as of January 4, 2021.[40] The series has been popular; it has over 8.4 million copies in circulation in Japan,[41] and has been published in nine countries.[b] It was also adapted into an anime series—the 24-episode first season aired on Tokyo MX between July and December 2019,[51] while a second season is scheduled for January 2021.[52]

On December 11, 2020, he started to serialize Trillion Game in Big Comic Superior, once again in collaboration with Ryoichi Ikegami.[53]

WorksEdit

  • Nandodemo Roku Gatsu Jū San Hi (何度でも6月13日, lit. "Any Number of Times on the 13th of June") (2001)
  • Square Freeze (スクウェアフリーズ, Sukuea Furīzu) (2001)
  • Love Love Santa (LOVE LOVE サンタ) (2002)
  • Eyeshield 21 (アイシールド21, Aishīrudo Nijūichi) (one-shot with Yusuke Murata; 2002)
  • Eyeshield 21 (series with Yusuke Murata; 2002–2009)
  • Kiba&Kiba (with Bonjae; 2010)
  • Shinpai Kato No Face (心配怪盗 NO FACE) (with Katsunori Matsui; 2011)
  • Alpha Centauri Dōbutsuen (αケンタウリ動物園, lit. "Alpha Centauri Zoo") (with Katsunori Matsui; 2014)
  • Kobushi Zamurai (こぶしざむらい) (with Ryoichi Ikegami; 2015)
  • Dr. Stone (ドクターストーン, Dokutā Sutōn) (with Boichi; 2017–)
  • Trillion Game (トリリオンゲーム, Toririon Gēmu) (with Ryoichi Ikegami; 2020–)

NotesEdit

  1. ^ An English translation of the manga was published in North America by Viz Media under the Shonen Jump Advanced label between April 5, 2005 and October 4, 2011.[21][22][23] The manga has also been licensed in France by Glénat,[24] in Hong Kong by Culturecom,[25] in Indonesia by Elex Media Komputindo,[26] in Italy by Panini Comics,[27] in South Korea by Daewon Media,[28] and in Taiwan by Tong Li Publishing.[29]
  2. ^ An English-language translation of the manga is published by Viz Media since September 2018.[42] It has also been published in Brazil and Mexico by Panini Comics,[43][44] in France by Glénat,[45] in Hong Kong by Jade Dinasty,[46] in Italy by Star Comics,[47] in Poland by Waneko,[48] in Spain by Editorial Ivrea,[49] and in Taiwan by Tong Li Publishing.[50]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b 稲垣理一郎のプロフィール. Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  2. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (December 14, 2007). まんが道 (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on August 25, 2008. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  3. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (August 7, 2007). まんが甲子園 (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on April 6, 2009. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c O'Mara, Sean; Schley, Matt (January 6, 2014). "Riichiro Inagaki Interview". Otaku USA. Archived from the original on May 6, 2014. Retrieved January 13, 2014.
  5. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (June 26, 2006). 漫画の『アシスタント』 (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on August 20, 2006. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  6. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (October 24, 2006). ご恩返し (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on March 22, 2007. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  7. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (October 2001). 何度でも6月13日. Big Comic Spirits (in Japanese). Shogakukan (2).
  8. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (November 2001). スクウェアフリーズ. Big Comic Spirits (in Japanese). Shogakukan (4).
  9. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (November 2002). "LOVE LOVE サンタ". Big Comic Spirits (in Japanese). Shogakukan (51).
  10. ^ a b Chang, Chih-Chieh (August 20, 2009). "Interview: Riichiro Inagaki & Yusuke Murata, Creators of Eyeshield 21". Anime News Network. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  11. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (April 17, 2007). モネ展(下) (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on April 8, 2009. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  12. ^ 作家データベース/原作者リスト [Author's Database/Original Work's List] (in Japanese). Jump J Books. Archived from the original on October 1, 2010.
  13. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro; Murata, Yusuke (March 5, 2002). アイシールド21 前編 [Eyeshield 21 Part 1]. Weekly Shōnen Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha (14): 143–178.
  14. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro; Murata, Yusuke (March 12, 2002). アイシールド21 後編 [Eyeshield 21 Part 2]. Weekly Shōnen Jump (in Japanese). Shueisha (15): 113–142.
  15. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro; Murata, Yusuke (July 23, 2002). 黄金の脚を持つ男 [The Boy With the Golden Legs]. Weekly Shōnen Jump. Eyeshield 21 (in Japanese). Shueisha (34): 9–74.
  16. ^ アイシールド21完結&ジャガーの題字をアッキーナ書く. Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. June 15, 2009. Retrieved February 23, 2014.
  17. ^ Loo, Egan (June 17, 2009). "Eyeshield 21 Football Manga Ends in Japan After 7 Years". Anime News Network. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  18. ^ アイシールド21 37 [Eyeshield 21 37] (in Japanese). Shueisha. Retrieved September 8, 2012.
  19. ^ Brenner, Robin E. (2007). Understanding manga and anime. Libraries Unlimited. pp. 123–. ISBN 978-1-59158-332-5. Retrieved 19 May 2011.
  20. ^ アイシールド21:ついに"タッチダウン" 2000万部のアメフットマンガが完結. Mainichi Shimbun (in Japanese). June 15, 2009. Archived from the original on June 18, 2009.
  21. ^ Macdonald, Christopher (December 20, 2004). "New Shonen Jump Graphic Novel Line". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 6, 2014. Retrieved June 15, 2013.
  22. ^ "Eyeshield 21, Vol. 1". Viz Media. Archived from the original on September 15, 2010.
  23. ^ "Eyeshield 21, Volume 37". Viz Media. Archived from the original on May 6, 2014. Retrieved June 15, 2013.
  24. ^ "Eyeshield 21 - Tome 37" (in Japanese). Glénat. Archived from the original on May 6, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  25. ^ 文化傳信 日本漫畫香港中文版書目(20/9/2012更新) (PDF) (in Chinese). Hong Kong Comics and Animation Federation. p. 1. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 15, 2014.
  26. ^ "Buku Eyeshield 21 37" (in Indonesian). Elex Media Komputindo. Archived from the original on May 6, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  27. ^ "Eyeshield 21 37" (in Italian). Panini Comics. Archived from the original on January 4, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  28. ^ "아이실드21 36 - Sena vs Panther" (in Korean). Daewon Media. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  29. ^ 光速蒙面俠 (第37集) (in Chinese). Tong Li Publishing. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2014.
  30. ^ "List of Eyeshield 21 episode titles (1-13)" (in Japanese). TV Tokyo. Retrieved October 22, 2012.
  31. ^ "List of Eyeshield 21 episode titles (134-145)" (in Japanese). TV Tokyo. Retrieved October 22, 2012.
  32. ^ a b Inagaki, Riichiro (March 18, 2007). 米スタジオ (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on June 25, 2009. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  33. ^ Inagaki, Riichiro (May 26, 2006). 手塚賞 (in Japanese). Kome Studio. Archived from the original on April 12, 2009. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  34. ^ ジャンプに「ムヒョとロージー」西義之が読み切りで登場. Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. June 14, 2010. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  35. ^ 稲垣理一郎×松井勝法、ヤンジャンで心配性の怪盗描く. Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. December 2, 2010. Retrieved June 8, 2013.
  36. ^ "αケンタウリ動物園 前編 試し読み". Jump X official website. Archived from the original on October 19, 2016. Retrieved January 9, 2013.
  37. ^ "池上遼一×稲垣理一郎コラボ読み切りがスペリオールに!ゴトウユキコも登場". Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. August 12, 2015. Retrieved July 23, 2019.
  38. ^ Pineda, Rafael Antonio (January 26, 2017). "Shonen Jump Magazine to Launch 6 New Series By Kuroko's Basketball, Beelzebub, More Authors". Anime News Network. Retrieved December 29, 2017.
  39. ^ Sherman, Jennifer (January 21, 2019). "Dr. Stone, Age 12, More Win 64th Shogakukan Manga Awards". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  40. ^ "Dr.STONE 19" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  41. ^ 次世代ドライヤー「MONSTER」とTVアニメ『Dr.STONE』がコラボ!! 小泉成器『世紀の発明品』をアニメイトタイムズ記者が開発者・石神千空と共に迫る!?. animate Times (in Japanese). Animate. January 1, 2021. Archived from the original on January 3, 2021. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  42. ^ "Dr. Stone Vol. 1". Viz Media. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  43. ^ "Dr. Stone - Edição 1" (in Portuguese). Panini Comics. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  44. ^ "Dr. Stone N.1" (in Spanish). Panini Comics. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  45. ^ "Manga Dr. Stone" (in French). Glénat. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  46. ^ "Dr Stone 第1期" (in Chinese). Jade Dinasty. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  47. ^ "Dr.Stone N.1" (in Italian). Star Comics. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  48. ^ "Dr. Stone #1 już jest!" (in Polish). Waneko. November 22, 2019. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  49. ^ "Dr. Stone" (in Spanish). Editorial Ivrea. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  50. ^ "Dr.Stone 新石紀 1 (首刷附錄版)" (in Chinese). Tong Li Publishing. Retrieved January 13, 2021.
  51. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (July 7, 2019). "Dr. Stone Anime to Have 24 Episodes". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  52. ^ Patrick Frye (December 12, 2019). "Dr. Stone Season 2 anime for Stone Wars announced in Weekly Shonen Jump issue 3 of 2020". Monsters and Critics. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  53. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (November 12, 2020). "Crying Freeman's Ryoichi Ikegami, Dr. Stone's Riichirou Inagaki Launch Trillion Game Manga". Anime News Network. Retrieved December 31, 2020.

External linksEdit