Rick Boyages

Richard James Boyages (born March 15, 1962) is Associate Commissioner for Men's Basketball for the annual Big Ten Conference. Working with Big Ten Commissioner James E. Delaney, Boyages serves as main administrator and conference office liaison for the Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament and primary overseer of the men's basketball officiating program.[1]

Rick Boyages
Personal information
Born (1962-03-15) March 15, 1962 (age 58)
Wakefield, Massachusetts
NationalityAmerican
Career information
High school
CollegeBowdoin (1981–1985)
NBA draft1985 / Undrafted
Career history
As coach:
1985–1987Babson (assistant)
1987–1991Bates
1991–1997Boston College (assistant)
1997–2000Ohio State (associate HC)
2000–2003William & Mary
2003–2004Ohio State (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
  • New England Basketball Hall of Fame (2009)

Prior to this, Boyages was head coach and association commissioner for the Mid-American Conference (MAC), which he joined in 2005 after stints as special assistant to the athletic director at Ohio State University in its 2004–05 academic year, and as head coach for the William & Mary Tribe men's basketball team from 2000 to 2003.[2] He compiled a 33–52 overall record (21–31 in the CAA) during his three seasons as William & Mary's coach.[2]

Boyages started his coaching career at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, where he coached for four seasons. In 1987, he became Bates' head basketball coach at age 24, the nation's youngest collegiate head coach that year.[3] His Division I career began at Boston College in 1991, however, following his years at Bates. He also spent two separate stints as an assistant coach for the Ohio State men's team (1998–2000 and 2003–2004).[3]

A native of Wakefield, Massachusetts, Boyages is a 1985 graduate of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, where he was a studio art major and a basketball team captain. At his graduation he received the college's Allison Haldane Cup for outstanding leadership and character. He earned a master's degree in education from Boston University and was inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of Fame in Glastonbury, Connecticut, in 2009.[4][5]

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