Richard Sprigg Canby (September 30, 1808 – July 27, 1895) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Richard Sprigg Canby
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849
Preceded byJoseph Vance
Succeeded byMoses Bledso Corwin
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the Hardin & Logan County district
In office
December 1, 1845 – December 6, 1846
Preceded byJohn F. Henckle
Succeeded byWilliam Lawrence
Personal details
Born(1808-09-30)September 30, 1808
Lebanon, Ohio
DiedJuly 27, 1895(1895-07-27) (aged 86)
Olney, Illinois
Resting placeHave Hill Cemetery
Political partyWhig
Alma materMiami University

Born in Lebanon, Ohio, Canby completed preparatory studies. He attended Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, from 1826 to 1828. He engaged in mercantile pursuits and while thus employed studied law. He was admitted to the bar about 1840 and commenced practice in Bellefontaine, Ohio. He served as member of the State house of representatives in 1845 and 1846.

Canby was elected as a Whig to the Thirtieth Congress (March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849). He engaged in agricultural pursuits. Upon its formation in 1856 affiliated with the Republican Party. He moved to Olney, Illinois, in 1863, where he resumed the practice of law.

Canby was elected judge of the second judicial circuit court of Illinois in 1867 and served for several years. He again resumed the practice of his profession in Olney. Discontinued active business pursuits in 1882, and lived in retirement until his death. He died in Olney, Illinois, July 27, 1895. He was interred in Haven Hill Cemetery.

SourcesEdit

  • United States Congress. "Richard S. Canby (id: C000108)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

  This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph Vance
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 4th congressional district

1847–1849
Succeeded by
Moses Bledso Corwin