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Richard Rothstein is an American historian and academic. He is a Senior Fellow at the Haas Institute at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law.[1] Rothstein is also a Distinguished Fellow of the Economic Policy Institute and a Senior Fellow, Emeritus at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.[2] Previously, he was the National Education Columnist for The New York Times from 1999 to 2002.[3] His research focuses on the history of segregation in the United States with regards to education and housing.

Richard Rothstein
Born1943
ResidenceBerkeley, California
NationalityAmerican
OccupationHistorian, author
Academic background
Alma materHarvard University
Academic work
DisciplineEducation and housing policy
Notable worksThe Color of Law

His most recent work is The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. The book explores Rothstein's contention that racial housing segregation is in fact the result of government policy, both federal, state, and local. Rothstein's argument is in contrast to the prevailing view, held by Supreme Court in the 1973 decision Miliken vs. Bradley and a subsequent 2007 decision: that housing segregation is primarily the result of private racism and decisions.[4] The book was positively received; a review in The New York Times said that there was "no better history" of housing segregation, while Rachel Cohen of Slate called The Color of Law "essential."[5][6]

Contents

BibliographyEdit

  • The Way We Were? Myths and Realities of America's Student Achievement (1998)[7]
  • Class and Schools (2004)[8]
  • Grading Education: Getting Accountability Right (2008)[9]
  • Rothstein, Richard (2017). The Color of Law : A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. New York: Liveright.

Critical studies and reviews of Rothstein's workEdit

The Color of LawEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Richard Rothstein | Haas Institute". haasinstitute.berkeley.edu. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  2. ^ "Richard Rothstein People". Economic Policy Institute. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  3. ^ Rothstein, Richard (November 10, 1999). "LESSONS; Does Social Class Matter in School?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 19, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  4. ^ Greenhouse, Linda (June 29, 2007). "Justices Limit the Use of Race in School Plans for Integration". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on February 2, 2017. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  5. ^ Oshinsky, David (June 20, 2017). "A Powerful, Disturbing History of Residential Segregation in America". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  6. ^ Cohen, Rachel M. (May 5, 2017). "Discrimination Is Not De Facto". Slate. ISSN 1091-2339. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  7. ^ "The Way We Were? The Myths and Realities of America's Student Achievement". Economic Policy Institute. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  8. ^ "Class and Schools: Using Social, Economic, and Educational Reform to Close the Black–White Achievement Gap". Economic Policy Institute. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  9. ^ "Grading Education: Getting Accountability Right". Economic Policy Institute. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.