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The Rhymney Valley (Welsh: Cwm Rhymni) is one of the South Wales valleys. After the abolition of the counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire in 1974, Rhymney Valley was created as one of the districts of Mid Glamorgan.[1] The valley encompasses the villages of Abertysswg, Fochriw, Pontlottyn, Tir-Phil, New Tredegar, Aberbargoed, Rhymney, and Ystrad Mynach, and the towns of Bargoed and Caerphilly.

Contents

GeographyEdit

Created as a glacial valley, now the Rhymney River flows largely south to Rumney, a district of Cardiff. The river is the ancient boundary between Glamorgan and Monmouthshire.

Groesfaen, Deri, Pentwyn and Fochriw are located in the Darran Valley and not the Rhymney Valley. This valley joins the Rhymney Valley at Bargoed

Llanbradach is a large village in the Rhymney Valley between Ystrad Mynach and Caerphilly,

HistoryEdit

This valley is one of the South Wales Valleys, and its history largely follows theirs: sparsely populated until the nineteenth century; industrialised for iron, steel and coal; industrial decline in the 1980s and 1990s. The Rhymney Valley produced a miner poet, Idris Davies of Rhymney, famous for his poems associated with the locality and the struggles of its people.

The 1990s brought improved road connections to the valley—a dual carriageway running north from Caerphilly—increasing access to and from Cardiff and the M4 motorway, and increasing the numbers of commuters from the valley to Cardiff. The area is now one of the most populous in Wales.

The Rhymney Valley hosted the National Eisteddfod in 1990.

There is a legend to explain how coal first came to be found in the Rhymney Valley. It is said that the local fairies were being pestered by a giant. They asked help from an owl, who slew the giant. As the fairies burnt the giant's body, the ground burned away, exposing the coal.[2]

Gorsedd StonesEdit

 
Rhymney Valley Gorsedd Stones

The Rhymney Valley Gorsedd Stones are located above Byrn Bach park, Tredegar on the site of the 1990 National Eisteddfod of Wales hosted by the Rhymney Valley.[3]

The stone circle consists of 12 standing stones arranged in a circle approximately 25m across with the tallest being 1.8m high a thirteenth stone marks the entrance to the circle. In the center is a flat stone known as the Logan stone. Stone circles of this type were erected on all sites of the National Eisteddfod until 2005 when as a cost cutting exercise fibre-glass stone circles were used for the first time. 51°46'35.6"N 3°16'46.1"W

TransportEdit

BibliographyEdit

Davies, John; Jenkins, Nigel; Menna, Baines; Lynch, Peredur I., eds. (2008). The Welsh Academy Encyclopaedia of Wales. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. ISBN 978-0-7083-1953-6. 

Further readingEdit

  • Evans, Marion, (1994), A Portrait of Rhymney with cameos of Pontlottyn, Tafarnaubach, Princetown, Abertysswg and Fochriw, volume 1. ISBN 1-874538-40-9.
  • Evans, Marion, (1995), A Portrait of Rhymney with cameos of Ponylottyn, Tafarnaubach, Princetown, Abertysswg and Fochriw, volume 2. ISBN 1-874538-70-0.
  • Evans, Marion, (1996), A Portrait of Rhymney with cameos of Pontlottyn, Tafarnaubach, Princetown, Abertysswg and Fochriw, volume 3. ISBN 1-874538-41-7.
  • Evans, Marion, (1998), A Portrait of Rhymney with cameos of Pontlottyn, Tafarnaubach, Princetown, Abertysswg and Fochriw, volume 4. ISBN 1-874538-02-6.
  • Evans, Marion, (2009), A Portrait of Rhymney with cameos of Pontlottyn, Tafarnaubach, Princetown, Abertysswg and Fochriw, volume 5. ISBN 978-1-905967-20-9.
  • Evans, Marion, (2007), The History of Andrew Buchan's Rhymney Brewery. ISBN 978-1-905967-07-0.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Davies (2008), p. 755
  2. ^ Ash, Russell (1973). Folklore, Myths and Legends of Britain. Reader's Digest Association Limited. p. 385. ISBN 9780340165973. 
  3. ^ "Past locations | National Eisteddfod". eisteddfod.wales. Retrieved 2018-07-21. 

Coordinates: 51°41′52″N 3°13′46″W / 51.69778°N 3.22944°W / 51.69778; -3.22944