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Renault Sport Racing and Renault Sport Cars, both commonly known as Renault Sport (French pronunciation: ​[ʁəno spɔʁ]) or Renaultsport, are the motorsport, performance and special vehicles divisions of Renault. Renault Sport was officially established in 1976 as a merger between the Alpine and Gordini competition departments.[4] Renault Sport Racing organises many Renault-backed one-make championships worldwide and is in charge of Renault group's official involvement in motor racing, including Formula One.

Renault Sport Racing/Renault Sport Cars
Divisions
IndustryAutomotive
Predecessors
  • Renault Sport Technologies
  • Renault Sport F1
Founded1976 (as Renault Sport)[1]
2 April 2002 (as Renault Sport Technologies)[2]
3 February 2016 (as Renault Sport Racing/Renault Sport Cars)
Headquarters
RevenueIncrease 70.3 million (2013)[2][3]
Increase €-4.8 million (2013)[3]
Increase €5.5 million (2013)[3]
Number of employees
1023 (2018)
ParentRenault
DivisionsGordini
Renault Tech
Websitewww.renaultsport.com

HistoryEdit

 
Old Renault Sport's logo used from the mid-1980s to 2004
 
Renault Alpine A110

Renault Sport was created at the end of 1976, when Renault closed down the Alpine competition department (at that time, its main motorsport division), located at Dieppe, and moved all the racing activities to the Gordini factory at Viry-Châtillon,[5][6] just outside Paris.[6][7][8] The Dieppe-based Alpine department specialised in the construction of race car chassis while the Viry-Châtillon-based Gordini focussed on engines. However, several conflicts emerged between them, and Renault took the decision to unify both departments into a single location in order to achieve a greater integration and harmony.[4] The company concentrated principally on developing a car for Formula One, although it also participated in other series.

In 2002, the Viry-Châtillon factory became the engine department of the Renault F1 team and Renault Sport was moved to Les Ulis and renamed Renault Sport Technologies (RST).[9]

On 3 February 2016, Renault announced a reorganisation of its racing and performance activities. The Formula One operation and RST's former motorsport branch were put under the new Renault Sport Racing division. RST's former roadcar branch at Les Ulis became the Renault Sport Cars division.[10]

RallyingEdit

Gordini-tuned Renault cars won many rallies during the 1950s and 1960s, and Alpine, being a subsidiary of Renault, won the first World Rally Championship (WRC) in 1973. In the WRC, Renault had some success with cars such as the R5 Turbo and the R17 Gordini until it left international rallying in late 1994[11] (although it continued competing in national and promotional rally series).

The European Rally Championship was won three times by a Renault car (1999, 2004, 2005).[citation needed]

On 21 February 2013, Renault Sport Technologies announced its official return to international rallying in the European Rally Championship.[12][13]

Renault's WRC summaryEdit

Season Victories WMC Points
1974   Press-on-Regardless Rally:   Jean-Luc Thérier (Renault 17 Gordini) 10th 23
1975 - 15th 8
1976 - 14th 6
1977 - 11th 18
1978 - 9th 33
1979 - 7th 41
1980 - 13th 12
1981   Monte Carlo Rally:   Jean Ragnotti (Renault 5 Turbo) 7th 61
1982   Tour de Corse:   Jean Ragnotti (Renault 5 Turbo) 6th 34
1983 - 5th 27
1984 - 5th 55
1985   Tour de Corse:   Jean Ragnotti (Renault R5 Maxi Turbo) 6th 38
1986   Rally of Portugal:   Joaquim Moutinho (Renault 5 Turbo) 7th 14
1987 - 3rd 71
1988 - 6th 32
1989   Rallye Côte d'Ivoire:   Alain Oreille (Renault 5 GT Turbo) 7th 30
1990 - 6th 24
1991 - 9th 4
1992 - 8th 9
1993 - NC -
1994 - NC -
Source: [14]

† Without Renault Sport assistance.

JWRCEdit

Year Entrant Car No Driver 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 JWRC Points
2003 Renault Sport Renault Clio S1600 61   Brice Tirabassi MON
1
TUR
Ret
GRE
1
FIN
2
ITA
Ret
ESP
1
GBR
Ret
1st 38
2004 Renault Sport Renault Clio S1600 39   Nicolas Bernardi MON
1
GRE
2
TUR
Ret
FIN
3
GBR
Ret
ITA
6
ESP
1
2nd 37
51   Larry Cols MON
5
GRE
4
TUR
Ret
FIN
6
GBR
Ret
ITA
4
ESP
5
6th 21
2006 Renault Sport Renault Clio S1600 41   Patrik Sandell SWE
2
ESP FRA ARG
2
ITA
1
GER FIN
7
TUR
11
GBR
6
1st 32
51   Fatih Kara SWE ESP
7
FRA
6
ARG ITA
Ret
GER
7
FIN TUR
9
GBR
Ret
16th 7
52   Bernd Casier SWE ESP
2
FRA
10
ARG ITA
Ret
GER
2
FIN TUR
8
GBR
Ret
11th 17
2007 Renault Sport Renault Clio R3 31   Patrik Sandell NOR
2
POR
15
ITA
8
FIN
1
GER
EX
ESP FRA 6th 19
48   Kalle Pinomäki NOR
10
POR
9
ITA
Ret
FIN
2
GER
9
ESP
Ret
FRA 11th 8

Off-roadingEdit

In 1979, the Marreau brothers finished in second place in the cars category at the Rally Dakar driving a Sinpar-prepared 4L 4x4. They won the 1982 edition with a Renault Sport backed Renault 20 Turbo 4x4.[15] Later, Renault Sport powered and sponsored the Schlesser-Renault Elf buggies which won the 1999[16] and 2000 editions.[17] The 1999 car was the first two-wheel drive Dakar winner.[18]

Formula EEdit

 
A Renault Sport-backed e.dams car driven by Nicolas Prost during the 2014 Punta del Este ePrix weekend

Renault was one of the first car manufacturers involved in the Formula E (FE) championship.[19] For the inaugural season, Renault Sport became a technical partner of the series,[20] also agreeing a title sponsorship deal with the e.dams team[21] which achieved the first FE teams' championship.[19] Before the 2015–16 season, following the introduction of new rules allowing the development of the electric powertrains used in the FE's Spark chassis, Renault announced it would entry as a supplier for e.dams.[19] The new powertrain manufactured by Renault Sport was named Renault ZE 15.[22] For the 2016–17 season, Renault added the Chinese team Techeetah as a powertrain client.[23] In October 2017, Renault Sport Racing announced it would withdraw from FE at the end of the 2017–18 season.[24]

Results of Renault Sport as a powertrain supplierEdit

(key) (results in bold indicate pole position, results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Season Entrant Chassis Powertrain Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Points TC
2015–16 Renault e.dams Spark Renault ZE 15 M BEI PUT PDE BNA MEX LBH PAR BER LON 270 1st
  Nicolas Prost Ret 10 5 5 3 11 4 4 1 1
  Sébastien Buemi 1 Ret 1 2 2 16 3 1 5 Ret
2016–17 Renault e.dams Spark Renault ZE 16 M HKG MAR BNA MEX MON PAR BER NYC MTR 268 1st
  Nicolas Prost 4 4 4 5 9 5 5 8 8 6 6 Ret
  Sébastien Buemi 1 1 1 13 1 1 DSQ 1 DSQ 11
  Pierre Gasly 7 4
Techeetah
  Jean-Éric Vergne Ret 8 2 2 Ret Ret 8 6 2 8 2 1 156 5th
  Qing Hua Ma Ret 15 16
  Esteban Gutiérrez 10 8 12
  Stéphane Sarrazin 11 14 3 12 3 8
2017–18 Renault e.dams Spark Renault ZE 17 M HKG MAR SAN MEX PDE ROM PAR BER ZÜR NYC 133 5th
  Nicolas Prost 9 8 13 10 Ret 15 14 16 14 Ret 10 11
  Sébastien Buemi 11 10 2 3 3 Ret 6 5 4 5 3 4
Techeetah
  André Lotterer DSQ 13 Ret 2 13 12 3 6 9 4 7 9 262 2nd
  Jean-Éric Vergne 2 4 5 1 5 1 5 1 3 10 5 1

Formula OneEdit

From 1977 to 1986 and again between 1989 and 1997, Renault Sport was in charge of Renault's Formula One programme.[25] Renault Sport F1, created at the end of 2010 and active until 2015, was a subsequent incarnation of Renault's involvement in Formula One and was headquartered in Viry-Châtillon, which functioned as a semi-independent operation.[26][27][28] In 2016, the Formula One operation became part of Renault Sport Racing.

Formula TwoEdit

Alpine constructed various chassis and prepared engines for Formula Two (F2). In 1973, Renault-Gordini (later Renault Sport) introduced a two-litre V6 engine for F2, the CH, which was the basis of its future Le Mans and F1 engines.[29] Jean-Pierre Jabouille and René Arnoux won the 1976 and 1977 European Formula Two Championships with Renault-powered cars.[30]

Results of Renault Sport as an engine supplierEdit

1976Edit

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Entrant Chassis Engine Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Driver's Championship Points
Écurie Elf Martini 16/19 Renault-Gordini CH1                        
  Patrick Tambay 3 3 2 3 Ret 3 Ret 3 Ret Ret 1 Ret 3rd 39
  René Arnoux 2 7 Ret 4 1 5 10 2 1 1 Ret 3 2nd 52
Equipe Elf Switzerland Jabouille 2J   Jean-Pierre Jabouille Ret 14 1 6 3 4 2 1 4 2 Ret 1 1st 53
  Michel Leclère Ret Ret 4 1 Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret 8 3 2 4th 33
1977Edit

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Entrant Chassis Engine Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Driver's Championship Points
Écurie Renault Elf Martini 22 Renault-Gordini CH1                          
  René Arnoux 1 Ret 2 5 Ret 1 16 Ret 1 Ret 1 2 6 1st 52
  Didier Pironi Ret Ret Ret 4 2 2 Ret 3 Ret 4 5 1 3 3rd 38
Willi Kauhsen Renault Elf Racing Team Kauhsen (Jabouille 2J)   Michel Leclère Ret Ret Ret DNS Ret Ret DNS DNQ 15 DNQ 10 0
  Klaus Ludwig Ret Ret Ret 8 DSQ 7 0
  José Dolhem Ret 0
  Alain Prost 10 Ret 0
  Vittorio Brambilla Ret 0
  Mario da Silva DNQ 0

Note: During this season Scuderia Everest also entered Renault-powered cars, although those were not supplied by Renault Sport.

Formula ThreeEdit

Gordini and Alpine-tuned Renault engines were used in various Formula Three (F3) series since the 1960s. Alpine (a partially owned subsidiary of Renault since 1973) also developed cars for the category.[29] In 1979, Alain Prost won the FIA European Formula Three Championship with a Renault engine prepared by Oreca. The last victory of a Renault engine before its withdrawal from the formula at the end of 2003 was in the 2003 Macau Grand Prix with a Sodemo-tuned unit from a Signature Team's Dallara car driven by Nicolas Lapierre.[31][32]

Renault Sport Technologies announced its return to F3 as an engine supplier with Oreca again as engine tuner for the 2014 FIA European Formula Three Championship.[33] However, this was indefinitely halted because of the lack of power of the Oreca-tuned engine compared to rivals.[34]

SportscarsEdit

Renault Sport was responsible for Renault's sports car racing entries during the 1970s, including their win at the 1978 24 Hours of Le Mans race with the Renault Alpine A442.[35]

Touring carsEdit

Capitalising on the growing reputation and success of the Super Touring regulations introduced in the early 1990s, Renault made the decision to enter the British Touring Car Championship in 1993 with reigning champion Tim Harvey and Alain Menu signed as their drivers.[36] Renault's first BTCC effort was based on the Renault 19 chassis, initially developed by test driver Jean Ragnotti. Success was almost immediate as Harvey and Menu scored a win each in 1993, before the 19 was replaced with the new Renault Laguna for 1994. The Laguna lent itself as a more competitive proposition than its predecessor and went on to be a highly successful car throughout its racing life, the highlight being in 1997 when Alain Menu took 12 victories on his way to the championship.[37]

HillclimbingEdit

In 2011, a Dacia Duster car prepared for Renault Sport Technologies, Sodemo and Tork Engineering and fitted with a Nissan GT-R engine participated at the Pike's Peak hillclimbing.[38]

Car manufacturingEdit

In 1994, Renault discontinued the Alpine marque, badging since then its sport cars manufactured at the Dieppe factory as Renault Sport.[39] Renault Sport models are also produced at Renault Spain's Palencia factory (Mégane Renault Sport)[40] and, since 2012, at Renault Argentina's Santa Isabel (Fluence GT).[41]

Current modelsEdit

BootcampEdit

In march of 2017 Renault released a set of games testing Precision which involved avoiding the obstacles during a time-trial. Endurance which involved setting a new record whilst challenging the Renault Sport drivers. Response which tested your memory and your agility behind the wheel. Concentration you needed to move through the gears and manage your speed on the track. The leaderboard for the games were open for 2 weeks. At the end of the 2 weeks the top 6 players were invited to the United Kingdom for a two-day Bootcamp (13-14 March). Following briefings with the engineers and physical tests at the Enstone plant, training would continue at the Silverstone race track behind the wheel of a Clio Cup and a Renault Sport R.S. 01 It would be time for the judges to reveal the name of the overall winner of the competition: whoever has produced the best performance will stay for an extra day at Silverstone for one final experience: drive a Renault Formula 1 race car! The winner of the 2017 contest was Vasilis Varras from Greece. YouTuber Matt Gallagher also took part. Both drove the f1 car which was the 2012 lotus

DivisionsEdit

RST is in charge of the conception and manufacturing of the Gordini-badged sport cars[42] and also of modifying cars and vans for special purposes (transporting people with reduced mobility, driving school cars, business fleets) through its division Renault Tech.[43][44]

SitesEdit

  • Les Ulis (Renault Sport Cars headquarters, marketing, development)
  • Dieppe (car manufacturing)
  • Viry-Chatillon (F1 engine development, management of series excluding F1)
  • Enstone (United Kingdom) (F1 chassis manufacturing and some related operations)[10]
  • Heudebouville (special purpose vehicles manufacturing)[9]

ActivitiesEdit

 
Renault Sport articulated lorrys with extended tents, representing Renault at Silverstone for the Renault World Series.

ChampionshipsEdit

Renault Sport organises several national and international one-make racing championships.

InternationalEdit

 
A Renault Fluence TC2000 touring car. Since 2011 Renault Sport's Argentinian division has the control of the Renault's official TC2000 team

Many international subsidiaries of Renault have their own Renault Sport division, including Renault UK,[45] Renault Argentina,[46] Renault Spain and Renault Italy,[47] among others.

Renault in motorsportEdit

Renault is also involved in other racing series but not as Renault Sport.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Jean Redele". Grandprix.com. 15 August 2007. Retrieved 22 February 2013.
  2. ^ a b "Renault Sport Technologies". societes.com (in French). Groupe Adverline. Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014.
  3. ^ a b c "Renault Sport Technologies". manageo.fr (in French). Manageo. Retrieved 30 September 2014.
  4. ^ a b Smith, Roy P (2010). "The Winds of Change: 1974–1979". Alpine Renault: – The fabulous berlinettes. Veloce Publishing. pp. 180–181. ISBN 978-1-845844-04-2.
  5. ^ "Jean Redele". Grandprix.com. August 15, 2007. Retrieved 17 October 2011.
  6. ^ a b "CONSTRUCTORS: RENAULT F1". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 17 October 2011.
  7. ^ a b "Renault Sport Technologies". Renault Group's Motorsport website. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
  8. ^ "Viry-Châtillon: 30 years of innovation and expertise". Pitpass.com. December 12, 2006. Retrieved 17 October 2011.[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ a b "RS Cup" (in French). Clio RS Cup. Archived from the original on 26 September 2013. Retrieved 16 November 2013.
  10. ^ a b "Renault launches comprehensive motorsport programme". Renault Sport. 3 February 2016. Archived from the original on 5 April 2016.
  11. ^ "Renault Manufacturer Profile & Rally History". Rallye-info.com. Archived from the original on 20 May 2012. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  12. ^ "Renault Sport signs up for the FIA European Rally Championship". Renault Group motorsport website. 21 February 2013. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  13. ^ "Renault seals ERC partnership with Michelin and Elf". Renault Group motorsport website. 21 February 2013. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
  14. ^ eWRC-results.com. "eWRC-results.com - rally database". eWRC-results.com. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  15. ^ "RENAULT 20 4X4 PARIS-DAKAR". Renault.com. Archived from the original on 8 April 2012. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  16. ^ "Renault Buggy – Dakar 1999". Renaultclub.cz. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  17. ^ "List of Dakar Rally Car, Truck and Moto Champions". Whoholdsthetitle.com. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  18. ^ "Dakar – Cairo 2000. The Schlesser-Renault-Elf team out in strength". Renault.com. Archived from the original on 29 October 2013. Retrieved 16 May 2012.
  19. ^ a b c "Renault ramps up Formula E role to become a constructor for 2015/16". autosport.com. Autosport. 29 June 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  20. ^ "Renault signs with Spark Racing Technology and Formula E Holding as Technical Partner in the FIA Formula E Championship" (Press release). Renault. 15 May 2013. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  21. ^ "Formule E - Le plateau prend form" [Formula E - the grid takes form]. Auto Plus France (in French). 2 July 2014. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  22. ^ "FIA homologates new manufacturer powertrains for Formula E". autosport.com. Autosport. 3 August 2015. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
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  26. ^ "Jérôme Stoll". Renault Sport F1. Archived from the original on 25 February 2015. Retrieved 25 February 2015.
  27. ^ "Renault launches Renault Sport F1. Genii Capital and Group Lotus join forces in Lotus Renault GP". International press website of the Renault Group. Retrieved 7 October 2011. External link in |publisher= (help)
  28. ^ "RENAULT MAINTAINS ITS COMMITMENT TO F1 AND ANNOUNCES THE CREATION OF RENAULT SPORT F1" (PDF). Renault. 8 December 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 November 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2011.
  29. ^ a b Smith, Roy P (2010). "The Second Coming". Alpine and Renault: The Sports Prototypes, 1973–1978. Alpine & Renault: The Sports Prototypes. 2. Veloce Publishing. pp. 15–22. ISBN 978-1-84584-226-0.
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  31. ^ "Two big names to return to Formula 3 stage". Flagword.com. 12 November 2013. Archived from the original on 2013-11-13. Retrieved 13 November 2013.
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  35. ^ Long, Brian (2008). "1978". Porsche Racing Cars: 1976 to 2005. Veloce Publishing. p. 51. ISBN 978-1-90478-845-4.
  36. ^ http://www.btccpages.com/entry-list/1993/
  37. ^ http://www.renaultsport.co.uk/press-centre/general/40-years-of-renault-uk-motorsport/
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  46. ^ a b "Renault Sport presentó su equipo de Super TC2000. Ahora se viene el de Rally?" (in Spanish). Rallynoticias.com. 16 January 2012. Retrieved 31 January 2013.
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  48. ^ TC2000 Historia Archived 2007-12-22 at the Wayback Machine tc2000.com.ar
  49. ^ Springbok Series classicscars.com
  50. ^ 24 Hours of Le Mans classicscars.com

External linksEdit