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In epidemiological research, recall bias is a systematic error caused by differences in the accuracy or completeness of the recollections retrieved ("recalled") by study participants regarding events or experiences from the past.[1] Sometimes also referred to as response bias, responder bias or reporting bias, this type of measurement bias can be a methodological issue in research involving interviews or questionnaires, in which case it could lead to misclassification of various types of exposure.[2] Recall bias is of particular concern in retrospective studies that use a case-control design to investigate the etiology of a disease or psychiatric condition.[3] For example, in studies of risk factors for breast cancer, women who have had the disease may search their memories more thoroughly than members of the unaffected control group; those who had the disease may recall a greater variety of risk factors they had been exposed to, including those falsely attributed to the disease in the media, such as use of oral contraceptives.[4] To minimize recall bias, some clinical trials have adopted a "wash out period", i.e., a substantial time period that must elapse between the subject's first observation and their subsequent observation of the same event.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Last, John M, ed. (30 November 2000). A Dictionary of Epidemiology. Oxford University Press. p. 153. ISBN 978-0-19-977434-0. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
  2. ^ Moren, Alain; Valenciano, Marta (Kitching, Aileen, ed.). "Information (measurement) bias". Field Epidemiology Manual. FEM Wiki. Retrieved 28 March 2013.
  3. ^ Kopec, JA; Esdaile, JM (September 1990). "Bias in case-control studies. A review". Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 44 (3): 179–86. doi:10.1136/jech.44.3.179. PMC 1060638. PMID 2273353.
  4. ^ Schulz, KF; Grimes, DA (February 2, 2002). "Case-control studies: research in reverse" (PDF). Lancet. 359 (9304): 431–4. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(02)07605-5. PMID 11844534. Archived from the original on June 15, 2016.
  5. ^ Mukhopadhyay, Sanjay; Feldman, Michael; Abels, Esther (2017). "Whole slide imaging versus microscopy for primary diagnosis in surgical pathology: a multicenter randomized blinded noninferiority study of 1992 cases (pivotal study)". American Journal of Surgical Pathology. Epub ahead of print: 39–52. doi:10.1097/PAS.0000000000000948. PMC 5737464. PMID 28961557.