Rebeca Iturbide

Rebeca Iturbide Betancourt (1924–2003) was a Mexican-American actress of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, who was known for her versatility, being able to play comedy or drama. She was a pioneer in television playing rolls in the mid-1950s. In addition to acting, she also wrote and painted.

Rebeca Iturbide
Rebeca Iturbide1.jpg
Born
Rebeca Iturbide Betancourt

(1924-05-21)21 May 1924
Died15 April 2003(2003-04-15) (aged 78)
Mexico City, Mexico
NationalityMexican
Occupationactress, artist
Years active1951-1976

BiographyEdit

Rebeca Iturbide Betancourt was born on 21 May 1924 in El Paso, Texas to Mexican-Jewish parents.[1] In the 1950s, she began working in films. Her first roles were in 1950 in "Doña Diabla" and "La mujer que yo amé".[2] In 1951, she got the opportunity to play opposite Germán Valdés in the film "El Revoltoso", which is considered one of his best films.[3] That role led to another joint project with Valdéz, "¡Ay amor... cómo me has puesto!".[4]

She had a reputation for versatility and appeared in adventures, comedies, melodramas and mystery films. Iturbide's most memorable movies included “La noche avanza” (1951), “Mujeres sin mañana” (1951), “El corazón y la espada” (1953), “Yo no creo en los hombres" (1954), and “Furia en el paraíso" (1955).[4]

Iturbide was an early performer in television, having her first part in 1955, playing Clare Graham in an episode of "Sheena, Queen of the Jungle".[5] In 1965, she practiced her hand at writing and wrote the script for the film, "Raíces en el infierno", which was directed by Myron J. Gold.[1]

In 1976 she was in an accident and broke her spine. She retired to the ANDA Casa del Actor (Actor's Home) and lived there for the last twelve years of her life.[1] While there, she painted and in addition to doing exhibits at places like the Modern Art Café at Plaza Loreto, she sold them and used the proceeds to help support the Actor's Home.[2]

Rebeca had four children; three of them with the tennis player Federico Sendel, whom she married in 1943.[6] Their children were: the journalist Virginia Sendel, president of the Michou and Mau Foundation Private Assistance Institution (IAP), which helps Mexican children who have been burned;[7] and twins George and Frederick Sendel; her other son is Eduardo Torres Izabal.

She died on April 15, 2003 in Mexico City, Mexico.[1] At her request, her ashes were scattered in the lake of Patzcuaro in Michoacan.[2]

FilmographyEdit

FilmEdit

TelevisionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Rebeca Iturbide". Sistema de Información Cultural (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Sistema de Información Cultural. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Incineran a Rebeca Iturbide" (in Spanish). Torreón, Mexico: El Siglo de Torreón. 17 April 2003. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Bethell, Leslie (1995). The Cambridge History of Latin America (1. ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. p. 475. ISBN 0-521-49594-6. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b Agrasánchez Jr., Rogelio (2001). Beauties of Mexican Cinema = Bellezas del cine mexicano. Harlingen, Tex.: Agrasanchez Film Archive. p. 114. ISBN 978-9-685-07711-8. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b "[Speciale Live Action] Sheena: Queen of Jungle (1954)". Fumetti Anime and Gadget (in Italian). Fumetti Anime and Gadget. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Hispano americano, Volume 37. Tiempo. 1960. p. 142. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Sepúlveda, Graciela (8 February 2014). "Después de las llamas…". Vitaminas para El Exito (in Spanish). Mexico: Vitaminas para El Exito. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "Raíces en el infierno". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Historia de un canalla". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ "He matado a un hombre". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "Amor de adolescente (Desnudos artísticos)". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "Los perturbados". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Ya se quien eres (Te he estado observando)". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "Victoria". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "Cabalgando a la luna". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ "Juan Armenta, el repatriado". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "Peor que las fieras". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ "El buscabullas". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ "Un camino al cielo". Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Instituto Mexicano de Cinematografía. Retrieved 17 May 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)