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Raymond A. Thomas

General Raymond Anthony Thomas III (born October 6, 1958),[1] also known as Tony Thomas,[2] is a senior officer of the United States Army and former commander of United States Special Operations Command.

Raymond A. Thomas III
General Raymond A. Thomas III (USSOCOM).jpg
General Raymond A. Thomas in March 2016
Born (1958-10-06) October 6, 1958 (age 61)
Pennsylvania, United States
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service1980 --Present
RankGeneral
Unit1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
Commands heldUnited States Special Operations Command
Joint Special Operations Command
1st Ranger Battalion
Battles/warsOperation Urgent Fury
Operation Just Cause
Gulf War
Iraq War
War in Afghanistan
AwardsDefense Distinguished Service Medal (2)
Defense Superior Service Medal (5)
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star Medal (5)
Purple Heart

He participated in numerous combat operations during his career, such as Operation Urgent Fury 1983, Operation Just Cause in 1989, Gulf War in 1991, and since 2001 the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Every year between 2001 and 2013 (minus his time in Iraq with the 1st Armored Division in 2007), Thomas deployed to Afghanistan as part of various special operations units.

Military careerEdit

Thomas was born in Pennsylvania on October 6, 1958 and graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1980.[1][3] Thomas was a member of the 75th Ranger Regiment.[4] He led a Ranger Rifle platoon during the Invasion of Grenada in 1983, that was dropped from an MC-130 onto a landing strip in Grenada. He completed Infantry Officer Advanced Course in early 1986 and was assigned as Assistant S-3, Plans/Liaison Officer with 75th Ranger Regiment at Fort Benning, Georgia until 1987. Thomas was then assigned as a company commander with 3rd Ranger Battalion. In 1989, during the Invasion of Panama, he led his Ranger Rifle Company in another combat jump.[5]

In 1992, Thomas volunteered for and completed a specialized selection course for assignment to 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta, also known as Delta Force. He served as Operations Officer, Troop Commander, Executive Officer and Squadron Commander from 1992 to 1994 and 1996 to 1999. In June 1995 Thomas earned a master's degree from the Naval Command and Staff College in Newport, Rhode Island. From 2000 to 2002, he served as commanding officer of the 1st Ranger Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment.

Thomas crossed over from the special operations realm into the conventional warfare realm when he was selected by Lieutenant General Mark P. Hertling, then-commander of the 1st Armored Division, to be his deputy commander during the Iraq War, from 2007 to 2008. During that tour the division worked alongside Arabs and Kurds and despite the difficult relationship between the ethnic groups Thomas was praised by Hertling for "his ability to quickly fuse intelligence" adding, "He helped us fight better." After his tenure in the 1st Armored Division came to an end Thomas returned to special operations.[6] From 2010 until 2012 Thomas served as the deputy commander of Joint Special Operations Command.[3] As a major general, Thomas was in charge of all United States and NATO special forces in Afghanistan from 2012 until 2013.[3][7] Every year between 2001 and 2013 (minus his time in Iraq with the 1st Armored Division in 2007) Thomas deployed to Afghanistan as part of various special operations units.[4]

After commanding special forces units in Afghanistan, Thomas was promoted to lieutenant general and was reassigned to CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia where he served as the Associate Director of the Central Intelligence Agency for Military Affairs.[3] In August 2014, Thomas replaced Joseph Votel as the commander of Joint Special Operations Command. Votel was promoted to four-star general and replaced Admiral William H. McRaven as the commander of United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM).[4] In a ceremony at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, on March 30, 2016 Thomas took command of USSOCOM and received his fourth star.[8]

Awards and decorationsEdit

  Combat Infantryman Badge with Star (denoting 2nd award)
  Master Parachutist Badge with 2 jump stars and   USSOCOM background trimming
  Ranger Tab
  Military Free Fall Parachutist Badge
  Honduran Parachutist Badge
  Unidentified foreign parachutist badge
  Joint Chiefs of Staff Identification Badge
  United States Special Operations Command Badge
  1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment Combat Service Identification Badge
  75th Ranger Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia
  13 Overseas Service Bars
Defense Distinguished Service Medal with one bronze oak leaf cluster
      Defense Superior Service Medal with four oak leaf clusters
  Legion of Merit
      Bronze Star Medal with four oak leaf clusters
  Purple Heart
    Defense Meritorious Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters
    Meritorious Service Medal with two oak leaf clusters
  Joint Service Commendation Medal
  Army Achievement Medal
  Army Presidential Unit Citation
Joint Meritorious Unit Award with oak leaf cluster
Valorous Unit Award with oak leaf cluster
  Meritorious Unit Commendation
National Defense Service Medal with one bronze service star
    Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal with Arrowhead Device and service star
  Southwest Asia Service Medal
    Afghanistan Campaign Medal with two service stars
    Iraq Campaign Medal with two service stars
  Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal
  Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
  Army Service Ribbon
   Army Overseas Service Ribbon with bronze award numeral 4
NATO Medal for the former Yugoslavia with service star
  Kuwait Liberation Medal (Saudi Arabia)
  Kuwait Liberation Medal (Kuwait)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Register of Graduates and Former Cadets, United States Military Academy". Sep 19, 1989. Retrieved Sep 19, 2019 – via Google Books.
  2. ^ Shear, Michael D. (February 14, 2017). "Unbelievable Turmoil': Trump's First Month Leaves Washington Reeling". The New York Times. Retrieved February 15, 2017. Gen. Tony Thomas, former head of the military’s Special Operations Command, expressed concern about upheaval inside the White House.
  3. ^ a b c d "New Senior Appointment at CIA – Matthew Aid". matthewaid.com. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c "New Commander Takes Over JSOC at Fort Bragg | Military.com". military.com. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  5. ^ Gal Perl Finkel, US NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER FACES CHALLENGES AT HOME AND ABROAD, The Jerusalem Post, February 22, 2017.
  6. ^ "The New York Times". nytimes.com. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  7. ^ "Defense.gov News Release: General Officer Assignments". defense.gov. Retrieved September 4, 2014.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-10-19. Retrieved 2016-04-04.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
Military offices
Preceded by
Joseph Votel
Commander, Joint Special Operations Command
2014–2016
Succeeded by
Austin S. Miller
Commander, United States Special Operations Command
2016–2019
Succeeded by
Richard D. Clarke