Ranunculus arvensis

Ranunculus arvensis, the corn buttercup[1] or field buttercup,[2] is a plant species in the family Ranunculaceae. Native to Europe, it can be found on other continents as an introduced species and sometimes a weed, including in North America and Australia. It was formerly a common annual arable weed in Britain, but is now rare there. It is most often found in moist places, such as spring puddles in meadows.

Ranunculus arvensis
Acker-Hahnenfuss-Blüte.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Order: Ranunculales
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Ranunculus
Species:
R. arvensis
Binomial name
Ranunculus arvensis

Many local common names refer to the spines on the seed heads or the achenes on the mature fruit:[3]

  • devil's claws
  • hellweed
  • devil-on-both-sides
  • devil's coach wheel
  • devil's currycombs
  • crowclaws (Yorkshire)
  • horse-gold (Yorkshire)
  • eggs-and-bacon (Cheshire)
  • jackweed (Oxfordshire)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ USDA, NRCS (n.d.). "Ranunculus arvensis". The PLANTS Database (plants.usda.gov). Greensboro, North Carolina: National Plant Data Team. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  2. ^ "Ranunculus arvensis". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).
  3. ^ "Corn buttercup (Ranunculus arvensis)". Plantlife. Retrieved 9 September 2021.

External linksEdit