Ralph René

Ralph René (August 24, 1933 – December 10, 2008) was an American small press publisher and inventor. René was a vocal proponent of certain Moon landing conspiracy theories. René's last self-published work, a pamphlet he distributed called WTC Lies and Fairy Tales, details his assertions regarding certain 9/11 conspiracy theories.[1]

Ralph René
Born(1933-08-24)August 24, 1933
DiedDecember 10, 2008(2008-12-10) (aged 75)
NationalityAmerican
EducationSelf-taught
Notable worksThe Last Skeptic of Science (aka MENSA Lectures);
NASA Mooned America!
Website
ralphrene.com

René appeared frequently in shows produced by The History Channel, National Geographic Channel, Fox television and Showtime. In one such show, The Truth Behind the Moon Landings: Stranger Than Fiction, journalist and former NASA employee James Oberg referred to René and other conspiracy theorists as cultural vandals.[2] René reacted onscreen with amusement and stated that he liked the characterization. René was also featured in an episode of Penn & Teller: Bullshit! covering conspiracy theories.[3] René was introduced as a physicist on the 2001 Fox documentary, Conspiracy Theory: Did We Land on the Moon?,[4] and had the designation "Author/Scientist" under his picture. However, René admitted in his biography that he did not hold a degree from any university[5] and always referred to himself as "self-taught."

Moon landing conspiracy theoriesEdit

His 1992 self-published book, NASA Mooned America!, details why he felt that the Apollo Moon landings were faked and actually produced from a closed studio.

Other claimsEdit

In addition to contending that NASA never sent astronauts to the Moon, René also proposes a number of other ideas René outlined most of these beliefs in his self-published book, The Last Skeptic of Science (1995). The original title of the book, MENSA Lectures (1990), resulted in a lawsuit against him by Mensa who felt he was misappropriating the name of their organization and using it to suggest they backed his beliefs.

Personal lifeEdit

René referred to himself as an "extra bright kid from the slums." After attending Rutgers University for a time, he dropped out and went to work as a carpenter and millwright. He then continued to pursue his personal interests in structural and mechanical engineering, physics, writing and inventing. René held two patents for simple mechanical tools.[6][7] He maintained a website that archived many of his past columns and essays on a wide variety of subjects.

BibliographyEdit

BooksEdit

Non-fictionEdit

  • René, Ralph; (as René) (1990). MENSA Lectures. Illustrations by Subi. Matlacha, FL: René. OCLC 21209369.
  • ——; (as René) (1994). Lucas, Stu (ed.). NASA Mooned America!. Drawings by Chris Wolfer. Passaic, NJ: René. OCLC 36317224.
  • ——; (as René) (1998) [First published 1995 (formerly MENSA Lectures (1990))]. Lucas, Stu; Hughes, Ed (eds.). The Last Skeptic of Science: "The Book Mensa Tried To Stop". Final edit by Steve Krisocki (1995 edition); Illustrations by Subi (Revised ed.). Passaic, NJ: René. OCLC 37029845.

FictionEdit

  • René, Ralph. A Case of the Jitters.
  • ——. A Case of the Missing Members.
  • ——. Husa 1.
  • ——. Husa 2.

PamphletsEdit

  • René, Ralph; (as René) (2000). ON SQUARING THE CIRCLE & The new π it brings!: Exploring Dan W. Gaddy's Quadrature of the Circle (Pamphlet). René.
  • —— (2002). WTC Lies and Fairy Tales (Pamphlet). René.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ René, Ralph. "Ralph René: Books". Ralph Renés' Website. Langley, British Columbia: Pioneer Abbey. Retrieved May 13, 2013.
  2. ^ The Truth Behind the Moon Landings: Stranger Than Fiction (2003) (TV) on IMDb
  3. ^ "Conspiracy Theories". Penn & Teller: Bullshit!. Season 3. Episode 3. New York. May 9, 2005. Showtime (TV channel).
  4. ^ Conspiracy Theory: Did We Land on the Moon? (2001) (TV) on IMDb
  5. ^ René, Ralph. "Ralph René: Biography". Ralph Renés' Website. Langley, British Columbia: Pioneer Abbey. Retrieved May 13, 2013.
  6. ^ "Patent US4191333 - Flame tip for soldering torch". Google Patents. Googleplex, Mountain View, CA: Google Inc. Retrieved May 13, 2013. US patent issue date: March 4, 1980.
  7. ^ "Patent US3164353 - VARIABLE PITCH ROOF BRACKET". Google Patents. Googleplex, Mountain View, CA: Google Inc. Retrieved May 13, 2013. US patent issue date: January 5, 1965.

External linksEdit