Rage Games

  (Redirected from Rage Software)

Rage Games (formerly Rage Software) was a British video game developer. Formed in Liverpool in 1992, its video games were marked by an emphasis on graphical effects with arcade gameplay.

Rage Games
TypePublic company
IndustryVideo games
Founded1992[1]
Defunct2003
FateBankrupt
HeadquartersLiverpool, England, UK

Rage's first title Striker sold more than one million copies throughout its two-year life cycle and established Rage as a major creative force in the interactive entertainment industry. The company went through rapid expansion in the 1990s and partnered with multiple third party software publishers for distribution of its titles.

Rage Games Limited was floated on the stock exchange in 1996 as Rage Software plc. Rage continued to form commercial partnerships with major publishing houses, including Microsoft, Intel, Dell, Compaq, Nintendo, Sony and Sega, and re-registered as a private company as Rage Software Limited in 1999.

In 2000, Rage began to expand into publishing. However, the costs of publishing and a run of games that did not sell as expected (most notably the David Beckham franchise) eventually led to the company closing in January 2003 due to bankruptcy. At its peak, it had offices in Liverpool, Birmingham, Sheffield, Newcastle, Bristol, Dundee and Warrington.

Some of the former development staff have formed other game development companies such as Swordfish Studios in Birmingham, Juice Games in Warrington and Venom Games in Newcastle.

List of games developed by Rage SoftwareEdit

1992Edit

1993Edit

1994Edit

1995Edit

1996Edit

1997Edit

1998Edit

1999Edit

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2001Edit

2002Edit

2003Edit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Majesco Signs Exclusive North American Publishing and Distribution Agreement With Rage Software". Business Wire. Berkshire Hathaway. 10 December 2001. Archived from the original on 24 January 2002. Retrieved 21 June 2019 – via Yahoo.com.

External linksEdit

  • Football in the New Media Age, Raymond Boyle, Richard Haynes, 2004. ISBN 0-415-31790-8