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Quinnipiac Bobcats men's ice hockey

The Quinnipiac Bobcats men's ice hockey team is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college ice hockey program that represents Quinnipiac University. The Bobcats are a member of ECAC Hockey. They play at the People's United Center in Hamden, Connecticut.[1]

Quinnipiac Bobcats
Quinnipiac Bobcats athletic logo
UniversityQuinnipiac University
ConferenceECAC Hockey
Head coachRand Pecknold
26th season, 511–307–91 (.612)
CaptainChase Priskie
Alternate captain(s)Scott Davidson
ArenaFrank Perrotti, Jr. Arena at the People's United Center
Capacity: 3,086
Surface: 200' x 85'
LocationHamden, Connecticut
ColorsNavy and Gold
         
NCAA Tournament Frozen Four
2013, 2016
NCAA Tournament appearances
2002, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2019
Conference Tournament championships
2002, 2016
Conference regular season championships
1999, 2000, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2019
Current uniform
ECAC-Uniform-Quinnipiac.png

HistoryEdit

Quinnipiac College began sponsoring men's ice hockey as a varsity sport for the 1975–76 season. The program joined as an independent NCAA Division II team. The team played as an independent Division II team until 1998, when the program joined the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC) and transferred to Division I.[2] The Braves won the MAAC Regular Season Championship in their first season in the league. The trend continued as Quinnipiac won the title the follow two seasons.[2] In 2002 The Braves won the team's first playoff series, winning the MAAC Playoff Championship with a 6–4 win over Mercyhurst.[3] With the win, Quinnipiac received an automatic bid to the 2002 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament, the first NCAA post season appearance in program history.[3] Quinnipiac faced off against Cornell in the first round of the East Regional, held in Worcester, Massachusetts.[4] Quinnipiac's run into the NCAA Tournament ended early in a 1–6 loss to the Big Red.[5] The game was the first NCAA Tournament appearance for the Braves.[6] Quinnipiac finished the 2001–02 season 20–13–5, marking the team's fourth consecutive season with at least 20 wins.[7]

 
The Quinnipiac Bobcats men's ice hockey team battles Dartmouth College at the then-named TD Banknorth Sports Center, February 2007. Quinnipiac student section is on right.

In 2003 the MAAC Hockey league split off from the main athletic conference to form Atlantic Hockey.[8] After two years in Atlantic Hockey Quinnipiac left to join the ECAC, replacing Vermont who left the league for Hockey East[9] and changed their name to the Bobcats. QU was chosen over a number of applicants in large part to the university's commitment to build a new multipurpose sports arena to replace the civic-owned Northford Ice Pavilion.[9] The Bobcats moved into the new 3,386-seat TD Bank Sports Center (then known as TD Banknorth Sports Center) in 2007.[10]

The 2012-13 season has brought Quinnipiac to national prominence. The program reached a new high becoming the number one team in the country on February 11, 2013 in both the USCHO.com poll and USA Today College Hockey poll. Quinnipiac retained the ranking the following week despite losing their first game as the top ranked team to St. Lawrence University as the 2nd and 3rd ranked teams also fell the same weekend. The Bobcats also won their first ever Cleary Cup presented to the ECAC regular season champion. On March 24, 2013, the Bobcats received the number one overall seed in the 2013 NCAA Division I Men's Ice Hockey Tournament. The Bobcats won the East Region with wins over Canisius (4-3) and Union (5-1) to advance to the school's first ever Frozen Four in Pittsburgh, Pa. In the national semifinals, Quinnipiac defeated St. Cloud State (4-1) to advance to the national championship game against archrival Yale. The Bobcats fell 4-0 to Yale to end the 2012-13 as the national runner-up.

In the 2013-14 season the Bobcats once again reached the NCAA tournament yet were defeated in the first round by Providence College 4-0. The team finished the season with a 24-10-6 record.

Quinnipiac once again had a successful 2014-15 season when they won their second ECAC regular season title in 3 years but lost in the first round of the NCAA tournament to North Dakota 4-1. The team finished the season with a 23-12-4 record.

The 2015-16 season saw Qunnipiac set a school record for wins with 32 along with winning their 3rd ECAC regular season title in 4 years and winning the ECAC tournament championship for the first time. Quinnipiac blew through the East Regional with wins over RIT 4-0 and UMass Lowell 4-1 to capture the regional championship and advance to the Frozen Four in the Tampa for the 2nd time in 4 seasons. In the national semifinals the Bobcats withheld a late charge by Boston College to win 3-2 and advance to the second national championship game in program history. Once again Quinnipiac was denied a national championship this time at the hands of North Dakota in a 5-1 defeat. The team finished the season with a record of 32-4-7.

RivalsEdit

Since moving to the ECAC, Quinnipiac's biggest rival has been the Yale Bulldogs. The rivalry is dubbed the War on Whitney Avenue as the two campuses are separated by a mere 8 miles on Whitney Avenue in Hamden, Connecticut to New Haven, Connecticut. The rivalry has reached its highest point in 2013 as both the Bobcats and the Bulldogs rank in the top 10 nationally and are 1 and 2 in the ECAC standings. Quinnipiac holds a 9-5-2 all-time record against the Bulldogs. The winner of the final game between the two teams receives the Heroes Hat which honors those who risked their lives during the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The two teams met on April 13, 2013 for the fourth time in the 2012-13 season in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to play for the national championship. Quinnipiac won the previous three meetings by a combined score of 13-3, but was upset in the national championship game, 4-0.

The Cornell Big Red have also become a rival of Quinnipiac with the teams meeting in five ECAC Hockey Playoff series since the 2007 season having won in 2007 at Lynah Rink and in 2013 and 2016 in Hamden with the latter two coming with Quinnipiac as the ECAC number one seed and seasons in which Quinnipiac reached the Frozen Four. Cornell won series in 2011 and 2018 both at Lynah Rink. Quinnipiac is 3-2 in those series against Cornell with three of the series going the maximum three games. Things on the ice have been heated at times with a lot of physical play and both Rand Pecknold and Cornell head coach Mike Schafer jawing at each other as well.

Records vs. Current ECAC Hockey TeamsEdit

As of the completion of 2018–19 season[11]

School Team Away Arena Overall Record Win % Last Result
Brown University Bears Meehan Auditorium 24–10–6 .675 3-4 L
Clarkson University Golden Knights Cheel Arena 16–12–3 .565 3-5 L
Colgate University Raiders Class of 1965 Arena 23–16–2 .585 4-5 L (OT)
Cornell University Big Red Lynah Rink 17–22–4 .442 2-2 T (OT)
Dartmouth College Big Green Thompson Arena 21–10–2 .667 5-1 W
Harvard University Crimson Bright-Landry Hockey Center 14–15–5 .485 1-2 L
Princeton University Tigers Hobey Baker Memorial Rink 17–12–1 .583 6-3 W
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Engineers Houston Field House 17–7–9 .652 2-1 W
St. Lawrence University Saints Appleton Arena 15–15–4 .500 7-2 W
Union College Dutchmen Achilles Rink 18–17–5 .513 1-1 T (OT)
Yale University Bulldogs Ingalls Rink 22–7–5 .721 4-1 W

Season-by-season results[11]Edit

All-time coaching recordsEdit

As of completion of 2018–19 season[11]

Tenure Coach Years Record Pct.
1975–1979 Jim Kennedy 4 22–48–1 .317
1979–1980 Ralph O'Connor 1 5–13–1 .289
1980–1994 Jim Armstrong 14 140–183–8 .435
1994–Present Rand Pecknold 25 511–307–91 .612
Totals 4 coaches 44 Seasons 678–551–101 .548

Statistical Leaders[12]Edit

Career points leadersEdit

Player Years GP G A Pts PIM
Chris Cerrella 1997–2001 126 99 106 205 230
Todd Johnson 1985–1989 109 90 112 202 128
Jim Hanscom 1976–1980 83 109 192
Bill Verneris 1978–1982 92 94 186
Brian Herbert 1999–2003 136 56 113 169 254
Bryan Leitch 2005–2009 157 53 116 169 124
Rick Ciardiello 1983–1987 61 97 158
Reid Cashman 2003–2007 151 23 125 148 246
Brandon Wong 2006–2010 147 68 75 143 92
Matthew Peca 2011–2015 157 42 101 143 91

Career Goaltending LeadersEdit

GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; SV% = Save percentage; GAA = Goals against average

Minimum 30 games

Player Years GP Min W L T GA SO SV% GAA
Michael Garteig 2012–2016 124 7261 78 25 16 237 19 .917 1.96
Eric Hartzell 2009–2013 106 6139 58 27 17 201 10 .924 1.96
Andrew Shortridge 2016–2019 78 4235 42 26 4 139 10 .923 1.97
Jamie Holden 2001–2005 107 5974 59 34 10 248 7 .921 2.49
J. C. Wells 1997–2001 85 4568 190 3 .901 2.50

Statistics current through the start of the 2019-20 season.

RosterEdit

As of July 17, 2019.[13]

No. S/P/C Player Class Pos Height Weight DoB Hometown Previous team NHL rights
2   Kārlis Čukste (A) Senior D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 220 lb (100 kg) 1997-06-17 Riga, Latvia Chicago (USHL) SJS, 130th overall 2015
3   Peter DiLiberatore Sophomore D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 2000-03-31 Bedford, Nova Scotia Salisbury (USHS–CT) VGK, 180th overall 2018
4   Michael Lombardi Sophomore D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1998-08-20 Barrington, Rhode Island West Kelowna (BCHL)
5   C. J. McGee Freshman D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1999-03-12 Pearl River, New York Shreveport (NAHL)
6   P. J. Fletcher Freshman F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 186 lb (84 kg) 2001-07-12 Dana Point, California Wenatchee (BCHL)
7   Marcus Chorney Sophomore D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-09-16 Hastings, Minnesota Amarillo (NAHL)
8   Alex Whelan (A) Senior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 212 lb (96 kg) 1997-07-20 Ramsey, New Jersey Jersey (USPHL)
10   Ethan de Jong Sophomore F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1999-07-12 North Vancouver, British Columbia Prince George (BCHL)
11   Wyatt Bongiovanni Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1999-07-24 Birmingham, Michigan Muskegon (USHL)
12   Daniel Winslow Sophomore F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1997-09-26 Fairfield, Connecticut Jersey (NCDC)
13   Jeremy Smith Freshman D 5' 9" (1.75 m) 188 lb (85 kg) 1998-07-16 Toronto, Ontario Surrey (BCHL)
14   Ethan Leyh Freshman F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 2001-06-07 Anmore, British Columbia Langley (BCHL)
15   Jayden Lee Freshman D 5' 9" (1.75 m) 155 lb (70 kg) 2001-01-10 North Vancouver, British Columbia Powell River (BCHL)
16   William Fällström Sophomore F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1998-02-03 Stockholm, Sweden Fargo (USHL)
17   Cam Boudreau Sophomore D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1999-11-27 Salem, New Hampshire Boston Jr. Bruins (NCDC)
18   Nick Jermain (C) Senior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 174 lb (79 kg) 1996-06-07 Norwalk, Connecticut Merritt (BCHL)
19   T. J. Friedmann Sophomore F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1998-02-27 St. Louis, Missouri Victoria (BCHL)
20   Matt Fawcett Freshman F 5' 6" (1.68 m) 140 lb (64 kg) 1999-04-22 Lincoln, Rhode Island Powell River (BCHL)
22   Skyler Brind'Amour Freshman F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1999-07-27 Raleigh, North Carolina Chilliwack (BCHL) EDM, 177th overall 2017
23   Zach Metsa Sophomore D 5' 9" (1.75 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1998-10-19 Delafield, Wisconsin Central Illinois (USHL)
24   Logan Britt Freshman D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1999-02-10 Crystal Lake, Illinois Sioux Falls (USHL)
25   Wyatt Head Freshman D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1999-03-28 Kelowna, British Columbia West Kelowna (BCHL)
26   Guus van Nes Freshman (RS) F 6' 3" (1.91 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1997-02-14 Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands Boston Jr. Bruins (NCDC)
27   Desi Burgart Sophomore F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1998-09-28 North Vancouver, British Columbia Surrey (BCHL)
28   Joe O'Connor Junior D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 215 lb (98 kg) 1996-03-16 Hamden, Connecticut Brooks (AJHL)
29   Odeen Tufto (A) Junior F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1997-01-09 Chaska, Minnesota Sioux City (USHL)
31   Keith Petruzzelli Junior G 6' 5" (1.96 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1999-02-09 Wilbraham, Massachusetts Muskegon (USHL) DET, 88th overall 2017
33   Josh Mayanja Junior G 6' 0" (1.83 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 1997-08-16 Framingham, Massachusetts South Shore (USPHL)
35   Evan Fear Freshman G 6' 2" (1.88 m) 188 lb (85 kg) 1999-07-05 Winnetka, Illinois Waterloo (USHL)

Awards and honorsEdit

NCAAEdit

Individual AwardsEdit

All-AmericansEdit

AHCA First Team All-Americans

AHCA Second Team All-Americans

MAACEdit

Individual AwardsEdit

All-Conference TeamsEdit

First Team All-MAAC

Second Team All-MAAC

MAAC All-Rookie Team


Atlantic HockeyEdit

Individual AwardsEdit

All-Conference TeamsEdit

First Team All-Atlantic Hockey

Second Team All-Atlantic Hockey

Atlantic Hockey All-Rookie Team


ECAC HockeyEdit

Individual AwardsEdit

All-ConferenceEdit

First Team All-ECAC Hockey

Second Team All-ECAC Hockey

Third Team All-ECAC Hockey

ECAC Hockey All-Rookie Team

Quinnipiac Bobcats Hall of FameEdit

The following is a list of people associated with the Quinnipiac men's ice hockey program who were elected into the Quinnipiac Bobcats Hall of Fame (induction date in parenthesis).[14]

Bobcats in the NHL[15]Edit

= NHL All-Star Team = NHL All-Star[16] = NHL All-Star[16] and NHL All-Star Team
Player Position Team(s) Years Stanley Cups
Connor Clifton Defenseman BOS 2018–Present 0
Connor Jones Forward NYI 2016–2017 0
Matthew Peca Center TBL, MTL 2016–Present 0
Brogan Rafferty Defenseman VAN 2018–Present 0
Devon Toews Defenseman NYI 2018–Present 0
Bryce Van Brabant Left Wing CGY 2013–2014 0

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Quinnipiac Bobcats, Union Dutchmen play 5-overtime hockey game, longest in NCAA history - ESPN". Sports.espn.go.com. 2010-03-13. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  2. ^ a b "Statistics :: USCHO.com :: U.S. College Hockey Online". USCHO.com. Retrieved 2013-06-13.
  3. ^ a b [1] Archived November 22, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "2002 NCAA Tournament". Inside College Hockey. Retrieved 2010-09-13.
  5. ^ [2] Archived December 8, 2005, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ "Statistics :: USCHO.com :: U.S. College Hockey Online". USCHO.com. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  7. ^ "Bobcat hockey looking for repeated success | The Quinnipiac Chronicle". 2002-10-10. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  8. ^ "Atlantic Hockey : ATLANTIC HOCKEY HISTORY". Atlantichockeyonline.com. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  9. ^ a b "Quinnipiac Officially Admitted to ECAC :: USCHO.com :: U.S. College Hockey Online". USCHO.com. 2004-08-24. Retrieved 2012-08-05.
  10. ^ Holtz, Jeff (2007-01-27). "Arena Fit for Quinnipiac's Ambition". The New York Times.
  11. ^ a b c "Quinnipiac Bobcats men's Ice Hockey 2014-15 Media Guide". Quinnipiac Bobcats. Retrieved Aug 15, 2019.
  12. ^ "All-Time Individual Career Records". Quinnipiac Bobcats. Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  13. ^ "2019–20 Men's Ice Hockey Roster". Quinnipiac Athletics. Retrieved January 16, 2016.
  14. ^ "Hall of Fame". Quinnipiac Bobcats. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  15. ^ "Alumni report for Quinnipiac University". Hockey DB. Retrieved August 17, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Players are identified as an All-Star if they were selected for the All-Star game at any time in their career.

External linksEdit