Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft

The Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft is a U.S. think tank founded in 2019 and located in Washington, D.C., named after former U.S. president John Quincy Adams. It has been described as "realist" and advocating for "restraint" in U.S. foreign policy.

Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft
Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft Logo.png
Formation2019; 2 years ago (2019)
Type501(c)(3) organization
84-2285143
Websitequincyinst.org

HistoryEdit

Initial funding for the group, launched in November 2019,[1] includes half a million dollars each from the Open Society Foundation (George Soros) and the Koch Foundation (Charles Koch).[2][3][4]

The think tank is named after U.S. President John Quincy Adams, who as Secretary of State said, in a speech on July 4, 1821, that the U.S. "goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy".[5] It has been described as "realist" and advocating for "restraint" in orientation.[6][7]

David Klion writes: "Quincy's founding members say again and again that 9/11 and the Iraq War were turning points in their careers."[8]

The Quincy Institute has been described as having significant agreements with the foreign policy of the Trump administration.[6][9]

CriticismEdit

Writing in Survival, the journal of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, international relations experts Daniel Deudney and John Ikenberry criticized the "restraints" that the Quincy Institute advocates for as "outdated" and "misplaced". They find that the Quincy Institute is unaware of great power competition, and how it has changed since the early 2000s post-Cold War moment. Deudney and Ikenberry argue that the Quincy Institute discards liberal internationalism, even though it would offer a more historically effective basis for institution-based restraint, than transactional agreements between states supported by the geopolitical restraint school.[9]

In January 2020, Republican U.S. Senator Tom Cotton accused the Quincy Institute of antisemitism, describing the Institute as an "isolationist, blame America First money pit for so-called scholars who've written that American foreign policy could be fixed if only it were rid of the malign influence of Jewish money."[10][11] Quincy president Andrew Bacevich described Cotton's claim as "absurd".[12]

The Jerusalem Post identified a number of fellows of the Institute who have been controversial due to their comments on Israel and Jews, including Lawrence Wilkerson, Stephen Walt, and John Mearsheimer.[11] Eugene Kontorovich has said many Quincy scholars singled out Jews and Israel for "special opprobrium".[11]

According to an April 2021 Tablet article, Quincy Institute fellows have taken public positions denying the Uyghur genocide.[13]

Co-foundersEdit

According to the Quincy Institute, its co-founding leaders include:[14]

  • Andrew Bacevich, President
  • Eli Clifton, Senior Advisor
  • Suzanne DiMaggio, Chairman
  • Trita Parsi, Executive Vice President
  • Stephen Wertheim

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft". Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft. Archived from the original on 2019-07-01. Retrieved 2019-07-01. as we near our public launch in November!
  2. ^ Kinzer, Stephen (June 30, 2019). "In an astonishing turn, George Soros and Charles Koch team up to end US 'forever war' policy". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on July 1, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2019.
  3. ^ Embury-Denis, Tom (1 July 2019). "George Soros and Charles Koch to fund new 'anti-war' think tank". The Independent. Archived from the original on 1 July 2019. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  4. ^ Coleman, Justine (December 3, 2019). "George Soros, Charles Koch foundations help launch pro-peace think tank". The Hill. Archived from the original on February 19, 2020. Retrieved May 23, 2020.
  5. ^ Klion, David (July 29, 2019). "Can a New Think Tank Put a Stop to Endless War?". The Nation. Archived from the original on August 3, 2019. Retrieved August 3, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Mills, Curt (2019-07-01). "Realism Resurgent: The Rise of the Quincy Institute". The National Interest. Archived from the original on 2020-12-16. Retrieved 2020-05-23.
  7. ^ "Charles Koch and George Soros teamed up on a new foreign-policy think tank. I have questions". Washington Post. Retrieved 29 July 2021.
  8. ^ David Klion, "Go Not Abroad in Search of Monsters: The Quincy Institute, a new DC think tank, will fight the Blob at home while advocating restraint overseas", The Nation, vol. 309, no. 3 (August 12 / 19, 2019), p. 21.
  9. ^ a b Deudney, Daniel; Ikenberry, G. John (2021). "Misplaced Restraint: The Quincy Coalition Versus Liberal Internationalism". Survival. 63 (4): 7–32. doi:10.1080/00396338.2021.1956187. ISSN 0039-6338.
  10. ^ Dolsten, Josefin (9 January 2020). "Republican senator accuses Soros-funded think tank of fostering anti-Semitism". Times of Israel. Archived from the original on 22 February 2021. Retrieved 5 January 2021.
  11. ^ a b c "New US think tank accused of antisemitism". The Jerusalem Post. 2020-01-29. Archived from the original on 2021-01-01. Retrieved 2021-01-04.
  12. ^ Chotiner, Isaac (January 13, 2020). "Andrew Bacevich on U.S. Foreign-Policy Mistakes". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on 12 December 2020. Retrieved 5 January 2021.
  13. ^ Rosen, Armin (April 28, 2021). "Washington's Weirdest Think Tank". Tablet. Archived from the original on April 30, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2021.
  14. ^ "About QI - Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft". Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft. Retrieved 28 July 2021.

Further readingEdit

  • Bender, Bryan (2019-12-02). "George Soros and Charles Koch take on the 'endless wars'". POLITICO. Retrieved 2021-01-04.
  • David Klion, "Go Not Abroad in Search of Monsters: The Quincy Institute, a new DC think tank, will fight the Blob at home while advocating restraint overseas", The Nation, vol. 309, no. 3 (August 12 / 19, 2019), pp. 18–21.

External linksEdit