Quick Reference Handbook

A Quick Reference Handbook (QRH) is an aircraft technical document - quick-access manual for aircraft pilots that contains all the procedures applicable for non-normal and emergency conditions in an easy-to-use format. In addition, performance data corrections are also provided for specific conditions.[1][2] A QRH is kept in the cockpit and can be consulted whenever the flight crew experiences in-flight problems. It includes various checklists for dealing with abnormal and emergency situations, based on the equipment and furnishings on the airplane. The aircraft manufacturer-designated checklists are always included in a QRH, and often the airline company or operator will include its own procedures. Therefore, there is no single universal QRH and they may differ widely in contents, but in practice, individual versions of it are referred to as the Quick Reference Handbook.[3] When designed and used correctly to address issues such as turbine engine failures or on-board fires, a QRH can prevent aviation accidents and incidents.[3]

FormatEdit

The first QEHs in the 20th century were made out of paper, but in the 21st century, many pilots have switched to so-called electronic flight bags, which have the advantage of electronic search functions, but require electricity to work.[3] Some modern aircraft such as the Airbus A330 have computerised some of the checklists, but other checklists cannot be properly programmed, because some problems cannot be correctly identified or diagnosed by aircraft computers; thus, the Quick Reference Handbook remains an essential in-flight tool for the crew.[2]

ContentsEdit

QRH have to include time-critical information and frequently used information for the flight crew.[4]

One example of a checklist in a QHR is the Engine Failure/Fire – Severe Damage or Separation checklist.[2][5](3:02) Another example is the Cabin Altitude Warning or Rapid Depressurization checklist.[5](4:55)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Quick Reference Handbook (QRH)". SKYbrary. Retrieved 27 March 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Bibel, George; Hedges, Robert (2018). Plane Crash: The Forensics of Aviation Disasters. Baltimore: JHU Press. p. 222. ISBN 9781421424484. Retrieved 28 October 2020.
  3. ^ a b c Chip Wright (19 March 2018). "The Quick Reference Handbook". Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. Retrieved 27 October 2020.
  4. ^ Chicago Convention - Annex 6. Operation of Aircraft, Part I - International Commercial Air Transport - Aeroplanes (PDF). Montreal: ICAO. 2018. ISBN 978-92-9258-473-3.
  5. ^ a b "Terrifying Moments as Engine Explodes in Flight, TWICE | Same Engine, Same Problem". The Flight Channel. 18 June 2020. Retrieved 28 October 2020.