Queensland Cricket

Queensland Cricket, formerly known as the Queensland Cricket Association, is the governing body of Cricket in Queensland, Australia. Formed in 1876,[1] it is directly responsible for the Queensland Bulls, Queensland Fire, Allan Border Field and Queensland Premier Cricket. Terry Svenson is the current CEO of the body,[2] and Chris Simpson is Chairman of the Board of Directors.[3]

Queensland Cricket
Queensland Cricket logo.svg
SportCricket
Founded1876; 146 years ago (1876)
AffiliationCricket Australia
HeadquartersThe Gabba
ChairmanChris Simpson
Official website
www.qldcricket.com.au
Queensland
Australia

Grade CompetitionsEdit

Queensland Premier Cricket was founded for the 1897/98 season as the premier competition for Brisbane cricket clubs but it has since expanded to represent wider South East Queensland with Ipswich, Gold Coast, and Sunshine Coast teams competing.

Other grade competitions affiliated with Queensland Cricket include Townsville Cricket,[4] and Cricket Far North.[5]

HistoryEdit

Early Queensland cricket administration: 1863 - 1876Edit

An early effort to administ rate cricket in Queensland came in December 1863 when an Intercolonial Cricket Match between Queensland and New South Wales was proposed and a 'Central Intercolonial Cricket Match Committee' was formed in Queensland in order to make preliminary arrangements,[6] which included making alterations to a cricket ground to accommodate the match.[7] In May 1864 the Committee organized for a Brisbane side to play an Ipswich side in order to determine which players should represent Queensland against New South Wales.[8] In July 1864 the Committee held a final meeting after the match had taken place to settle the accounts and consider preparations for future engagements.[9]

As of February 1865 another Intercolonial match had been proposed and the Intercolonial Cricket Match Committee was reformed with responsibility for an Intercolonial Match Fund.[10] The Committee was forced to change practice days for the Queensland side in March due to a scheduling clash with the Brisbane Cricket Club,[11] and in May the Committee proposed that in order to improve the practice and proficiency of the Queensland side a Queensland Cricket Association should be formed composed of delegates from each club who would be under the direction of the Committee itself,[12] and in June the body was formed and inaugurated,[13] however by 1866 it had disbanded.[14]

In January 1867 a media report observed that cricket was thriving in Queensland, with approximately six clubs in Brisbane and active clubs also existing in Ipswich and Toowoomba, and proposed that a Queensland Cricket Association be formed to settle disputes in the sport noting that other colonies already had such bodies.[15] In March an Indigenous Cricket team visited Brisbane, and a committee formed to organize matches decided to save any surplus funds raised for the visit be held in trust for a Queensland Cricketing Association if it was formed,[16] and in September a Queensland Cricket Association was established in Brisbane.[17] The Association was still in existence as of 1874, however in May that year the Association observed that many clubs were not represented in the body and it was decided that it should print and distribute its rules and urge clubs to appoint delegates as soon as possible.[18] In April 1875 the captain of the Gympie cricket team complained that the Queensland Cricket Association had refused to schedule a match between a Brisbane and Gympie side,[19] and in November the body was harshly criticized as being a "so-called "Queensland Cricket Association" which has never held a meeting or done an act within the memory of man."[20]

In March 1876 a meeting was held at the Royal Hotel in Brisbane attended by approximately fifty at which it was proposed to form a new body in Brisbane to be called the Queensland Cricket Association (Q.C.A.) and the proposal was unanimously carried. The body was to have a committee consisting of a President, two vice-presidents, a secretary, and a treasurer, to be elected by delegates of member cricket clubs. It was decided that for a club to qualify for membership in the Association it must have twenty members and that clubs would have one delegate in the Association for every twenty members with a maximum of five delegates. An objection was raised at the meeting, suggesting that clubs with over one hundred members would be under-represented, but concerns were dismissed with the reasoning that it was better to encourage many small clubs rather than a small number of large clubs.[21]

Club cricket era: 1876 - 1897Edit

The first meeting of the delegates of the Q.C.A. was held on 5 April 1876, at the Australian Hotel in Brisbane,[22] at which a subcommittee drafted Association rules which were decided on at a second meeting on 20 April.[23] In late April 1876 the Q.C.A. received a letter regarding an English cricket team which was to tour Australia and had offered to visit Queensland if the Association could cover costs.[24] The Association made an offer of 600 pounds in total for the English XI to visit the colony which was rejected.[25] In September the Q.C.A. drew up rules for a "Challenge Cup" competition for clubs to compete in,[26] and the inaugural 1876-77 season began in October marking the beginning of senior club cricket under the Q.C.A..[27]

Queensland Women's Cricket AssociationEdit

The Queensland Women’s Cricket Association was founded in the 1920s, but only began formally in 1929, with the Wynnum Women’s Cricket team. In this team Edna Newfong and Mabel Crouch were chosen as players, the first Aboriginal women to represent Australia in any sport. It was a major achievement in the 1930s as Aboriginal women had to face both racist and sexist disadvantages, all the while being under the control of the Aboriginals Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897, which legally restricted civil rights to Aboriginal people.[28][29]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "A brief history of Queensland".
  2. ^ "CEO". Queensland Cricket. n.d. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  3. ^ "Board". Queensland Cricket. n.d. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  4. ^ "Townsville Cricket". Townsville Cricket. n.d. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  5. ^ "Cricket Far North Inc". Cricket Far North Inc. n.d. Retrieved 27 January 2021.
  6. ^ "Telegraphic". The Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 3 December 1863. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  7. ^ "Telegraphic". The Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 14 December 1863. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  8. ^ "News of the Week". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 7 May 1863. p. 3. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  9. ^ "Notes and News". The North Australian. Brisbane, QLD. 28 July 1864. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  10. ^ "Intercolonial Cricket Match". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 23 February 1865. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  11. ^ "Notes and News". The North Australian. Brisbane, QLD. 9 March 1865. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  12. ^ "Telegraphic". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 6 May 1865. p. 4. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  13. ^ "Telegraphic". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 23 June 1865. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  14. ^ "Telegraphic". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 24 September 1866. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  15. ^ "To the Editor of the Queensland Times". The Darling Downs Gazette. Darling Downs, QLD. 19 January 1867. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  16. ^ "Cricket". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 19 March 1867. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  17. ^ "Athenian Cricket Club". Queensland Times. Ipswich, QLD. 10 September 1867. p. 3. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  18. ^ "Melbourne Races". The Queenslander. Brisbane, QLD. 30 May 1874. p. 12. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  19. ^ "The Gympie Cricketers". The Telegraph. Brisbane, QLD. 24 April 1874. p. 5. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  20. ^ "Intercolonial Cricket Match". The Telegraph. Brisbane, QLD. 29 November 1875. p. 3. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  21. ^ "Proposed Cricket Association". The Telegraph. Brisbane, QLD. 10 March 1876. p. 3. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  22. ^ "QUEENSLAND CRICKET ASSOCIATION". The Telegraph. Brisbane, QLD. 4 April 1876. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  23. ^ "QUEENSLAND CRICKET ASSOCIATION". The Brisbane Courier. Brisbane, QLD. 19 April 1876. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  24. ^ "Commercial". Maryborough Chronicle. Maryborough, QLD. 27 April 1876. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  25. ^ "Queensland". The Mercury. Hobart, TAS. 26 August 1876. p. 3. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  26. ^ "The Queensland Cricket Association". The Telegraph. Brisbane, QLD. 27 September 1876. p. 3. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  27. ^ "Cricket". The Telegraph. Brisbane, QLD. 20 October 1876. p. 2. Retrieved 12 January 2021.
  28. ^ Inset  This Wikipedia article incorporates CC-BY-4.0 licensed text from: "Mabel Crouch (Campbell) and Edna Newfong (Crouch). Queensland Women Cricketing Greats". State Library of Queensland. State Library of Queensland. 8 March 2021. Retrieved 19 May 2021.
  29. ^ Tatz, Colin (2001). Black diamonds : Queensland's indigenous sporting heroes. Ipswich, Qld: Global Arts Link, Ipswich City Council.

External linksEdit