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Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering, also known as the QEPrize, is a global engineering prize that rewards and celebrates the engineers responsible for a ground-breaking innovation in engineering that has been of global benefit to humanity. The £1 million prize is awarded biennially in the name of Queen Elizabeth II.[2] The 2019 prize was announced on 12 February to Dr Bradford Parkinson, Professor James Spilker, Hugo Fruehauf, and Richard Schwartz for the creation of the first truly global, satellite-based positioning system (GPS).[1]

The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering
Prize logo
Awarded forGround-breaking innovation in engineering which has been of global benefit to humanity
LocationLondon
CountryUnited Kingdom United Kingdom
Presented byThe Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation
Reward(s)Prize money of 1 million GBP and a trophy presented at Buckingham Palace
First awarded2013; 6 years ago (2013)
Winners4 prizes to 14 winners (as of 2019)[1]
Websiteqeprize.org

The prize was officially launched in November 2011 by a cross-party line up of the UK Prime Minister David Cameron, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, and Leader of the Opposition Ed Miliband. The inaugural prize was presented to the creators of the Internet, the browser and the World Wide Web in 2013.[3] The 2015 prize was awarded to Robert Langer for his work in controlled-release large molecule drug delivery.[4] The third QEPrize prize was awarded on 1 February 2017 to Eric Fossum, George Smith, Nobukazu Teranishi, and Michael Tompsett for research on digital imaging sensors.[5]

The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering FoundationEdit

The QEPrize celebrates engineering as a discipline and career choice, shining light on the excitement and importance of engineering and inspiring young people to get involved in the subject. It is run by a charitable company, limited by guarantee, called the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation. The Foundation is chaired by Lord Browne of Madingley. The fellow trustees are:

The QEPrize is funded by donations from the following international companies: BAE Systems, BP, GSK, Hitachi Ltd., Jaguar Land Rover, National Grid, Nissan Motor Corporation, Shell, Siemens UK, Sony, Tata Consultancy Services, Tata Steel and Toshiba.

The day-to-day running of the QEPrize is carried out by a team based at the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Award processEdit

NominationsEdit

The prize rewards an outstanding engineering-led advance that has produced tangible, widespread public benefit, and is judged on broad criteria that includes the cultural impacts of the engineering. Nominations are encouraged from the public, engineering and science academies, universities, research organisations, and companies around the world. The only restriction is that self-nomination is not permitted, and that the prize not be awarded posthumously.[2] Nominations can be made via an online portal on the QEPrize website.

SelectionEdit

A search group composed of eminent engineers sifts and develops the nominations before the judging process begins.[6]

The judging panel works from the information provided in the nomination, comments from referees and any additional information required in order to establish which nomination most fully meets the prize criteria. The panel uses the following criteria to select the winning nominations:

  1. What is it that this person has done (or up to five people have done) that is a ground-breaking innovation in engineering?
  2. In what way has this innovation been of global benefit to humanity?
  3. Is there anyone else who might claim to have had a pivotal role in this development?

AnnouncementEdit

The winner(s) of the QEPrize are announced every two years by the Chairman of the QEPrize Foundation. In the first four prize cycles, this announcement was held at the Royal Academy of Engineering and was attended by members of the British Royal Family.

Awards CeremonyEdit

The QEPrize awards ceremony takes place in the same year as the announcement. The QEPrize trophy, designed by the winner of the Create the Trophy competition, is presented to the QEPrize winner(s) by a member of the Royal Family. In the first two prize cycles, the trophy was presented by the Queen. The third trophy was presented by the Prince of Wales.

WinnersEdit

2019Edit

It was announced on 12 February that the 2019 prize would be awarded to the four engineers responsible for the development of the first truly global, satellite-based positioning system – (GPS).[1]

The 2019 prize winners were:

Their combined efforts have enabled free, immediate access to accurate position and timing information for over 4 billion people around the world. Its myriad applications range from navigation and disaster relief through to climate monitoring systems, banking systems, and the foundation of tomorrow’s transport, agriculture, and industry.

The announcement was made by Lord Browne of Madingley in the presence of the Princess Royal. The winners will receive their award in a ceremony later this year.

2017Edit

On 1 February it was announced that the 2017 prize would be awarded to the four engineers responsible for the creation of digital imaging sensors. The announcement was made by Lord Browne of Madingley in the presence of the Princess Royal.[8]

The winners of the 2017 prize were:

Together, their innovations allowed for advancements in medical treatments, science, personal communications, and entertainment. The winners received their award in a ceremony at Buckingham Palace later that year.

2015Edit

External video
 
  Hundreds of millions of people a year across the world benefit from the technologies that rest on the work of Robert Langer., Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering 2015

The 2015 prize was awarded to Robert Langer of United States for his work in controlled-release large molecule drug delivery.[9][10] The announcement was made by Lord Browne of Madingley in the presence of the Duke of York on 3 February. Dr Langer, who made a speech at the announcement, said he was “proud and privileged to win the biggest engineering prize in the world”.

2013Edit

The inaugural prize was awarded to a team of five engineers who created the Internet and the World Wide Web. The announcement was made by Lord Browne of Madingley in the presence of Princess Anne on 18 March. The winners of the 2013 prize were:

On Tuesday 25 June the winners received their award from Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace in front of an audience that included the leaders of the UK’s three main political parties, QEPrize judges, and a number of young engineers. On the same day, the Lord Mayor of London hosted a lunch at Guildhall in honour of the winners which was attended by Princess Eugenie and Princess Beatrice.

Judging PanelEdit

QEPrize Ambassador NetworkEdit

The QEPrize Ambassador Network is an international network that brings together the best and brightest early-career engineers from all fields around the world, who work to inspire the next generation to take up the challenges of the future. QEPrize ambassadors act as evangelists for engineering, engaging with teachers, parents, school children, politicians, and journalists about their work and why engineering is such an important profession.

The Ambassador Network became a global community in 2016.

Create the Trophy competitionEdit

The unique designs for the QEPrize trophy are found through the ‘Create the Trophy’ competition which, like the prize itself, runs every two years.[10] The competition, open to those aged between 14 and 24, gives young people the opportunity to get involved – testing their design skills using the latest in 3D-design technology. Since 2017, the competition is open to entrants worldwide. Entries are submitted online through a free app, QEPrize3D, which is available to download on Android and iOS devices.

2019Edit

The winner of the 2019 Create the Trophy competition was Jack Jiang, 16, from Hong Kong. Jack’s innovative design combines the traditional trophy form with elements from modern wind turbines; this can be seen from a top-down view.[1] The trophy will be 3D printed and presented to the 2019 QEPrize winners at an event later this year.

2017Edit

The winner of the 2017 Create the Trophy competition was Samuel Bentley, 15, from Wales, whose design was inspired by the highest Welsh peak, Snowdon. It will be 3D printed by BAE Systems and presented to the 2017 QEPrize winners at Buckingham Palace later in 2017.[11]

For the first time, entrants to the Create the Trophy competition in 2017 used the QEPrize 3D Design Studio mobile app to design their trophies.[10] The competition was also opened up to a global audience, and received entries from 32 countries worldwide.[12]

2015Edit

The winner of the 2015 Create the Trophy competition was Euan Fairholm, a mechanical engineering student at The University of Glasgow. His design, "The Golden Crown", was developed into a final form by BAE Systems and presented to Dr Robert Langer, the winner of the 2015 QEPrize.

2013Edit

The inaugural Create the Trophy competition was won by 17-year-old student, Jennifer Leggett. The national competition called for students to come up with a design capturing the essence of modern engineering.

Jennifer Leggett's tree-like trophy design symbolises the growth of engineering and represents the way in which all areas of engineering are interlinked. After winning the competition Jennifer Leggett was invited to spend the day with designer Thomas Heatherwick before the design was finalised.

The 2013 trophy was constructed out of a 3D printed resin that has been dipped in Nickel alloy. The tree-like trophy has some polished and some brushed modules, while the base is sintered aluminium.

Entries to the 2013 competition were submitted through an online design website.

Create the Trophy Judging PanelEdit

     Chair of Judges
     Judge
Judge 2013 2015 2017 2019
Yewande Akinola
Dame Zaha Hadid
Sir Nicholas Serota
John Sorrell
Deyan Sudjic
David Rowan
Mark Miodownik
Ian Blatchford
Roma Agrawal
Rebeca Ramos
Zoe Laughlin

QEPrize 3D Design StudioEdit

2017 marked the first time that the Create the Trophy competition ran internationally. It also marked the launch of the QEPrize 3D Design Studio (QEPrize3D), a bespoke app available for free download on iOS and Android devices.

The QEPrize 3D design studio is a 3D modelling tool, with a palate of 14 unique shapes and 5 different materials to choose from.

Inside the studio, designers can add to, subtract from, rotate, tilt, and zoom into their creations at the touch of a finger. Once the design is complete, trophies can be exported to the device’s photo gallery or shared directly to social media. An additional feature allows users to export the design as a 3D print-ready .OBJ file.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Press page". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  2. ^ a b "QEPrize home page". The Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation. Retrieved 20 March 2013.
  3. ^ "2013 QEPrize Winners". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  4. ^ "2015 QEPrize Winner". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  5. ^ "2017 QEPrize Winners". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 13 February 2019.
  6. ^ "Search Group - Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  7. ^ "Hugo Fruehauf". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  8. ^ "Richard Schwartz". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  9. ^ "GPS originator Richard Schwartz ME '57 Talks about his Work & the QEPrize | The Cooper Union". cooper.edu. Retrieved 18 July 2019.
  10. ^ a b "Create the Trophy Competition - Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering". Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  11. ^ "Introducing the 2017 QEPrize trophy - Create the Future". Create the Future. 23 February 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  12. ^ "Introducing the 2017 QEPrize trophy - Create the Future". Create the Future. 23 February 2017. Retrieved 24 February 2017.

External linksEdit