Pushkar Sohoni is an architect, an architectural and cultural historian and an associate professor of Humanities and Social Sciences at the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune.[1][2]

Education and experienceEdit

Pushkar Sohoni was born in Pune in 1976, and attended Loyola High School (Pune). After graduating with a Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.) degree from the University of Pune in 1999, he attended the University of Pennsylvania School of Design (then known as the Graduate School of Fine Arts) to get a Master of Science (M.S.) in Historic Preservation. In 2002, he wrote a Master's Thesis under the guidance of Prof. Frank Matero on preservation policy for the city walls of Cairo.[3] Pushkar Sohoni worked on conservation projects in Mesa Verde National Park and in the Saint Louis Cemetery in New Orleans, as part of the Architectural Conservation Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania.[4][5][6] He was a member of the archaeological expedition to Iran in 2004, to excavate sites of the Jiroft culture.[7] In 2005, he worked as a consultant architect for the Architectural Heritage division of INTACH, New Delhi, working on the documentation of Durbar Hall in Qila Mubarak, Patiala. In 2010, he received his doctoral degree (Ph.D.) from the Department of History of Art, (School of Arts & Sciences) University of Pennsylvania for his dissertation on the architecture of the Nizam Shahi dynasty.[8][9] He worked under the supervision of Prof. Michael W. Meister and Prof. Renata Holod. His work on the palaces of the Nizam Shahs has been published in several places.[10] Pushkar Sohoni was the post-doctoral fellow in Indo-Persian Studies at the University of British Columbia in 2010-2011,[11] after which he returned to the University of Pennsylvania as the South Asia Bibliographer and Librarian at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries,[12][13] and a lecturer in the Department of South Asian Studies from 2011 to 2016. In this period, Pushkar Sohoni was in charge of the South Asia Collection at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, and wrote a "widely circulated blog post" on collecting practices for libraries.[14] He was on the advisory board of the Title VI South Asia Center.[15] Pushkar Sohoni also served as a member of the Committee on South Asian Libraries and Documentation (CONSALD),[16] and was on the executive board of the South Asia Materials Project (SAMP) from 2013 to 2015.[17] In October 2016, he joined the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune as an Assistant Professor,[18] and became an Associate Professor in 2019. In 2017-18, he was a visiting Associate Professor at Anant National University.[19][20] In 2015, he authored a book, Aurangabad, with Daulatabad, Khuldabad, and Ahmadnagar, focused on the sultanate architecture in the region.[21][22] The book was quoted in a Bombay High Court order in 2018.[23] In 2017, he co-authored with Kenneth X. Robbins, a book on the Jewish heritage in the western Deccan, titled Jewish Heritage of the Deccan: Mumbai, the Northern Konkan and Pune.[24][25][26][27] In 2017-2018, he wrote a fortnightly column 'By the Wayside' for the Pune Mirror.[28] In 2018, his book on the Nizam Shahs of Ahmadnagar and their architectural legacy in 2018, called The Architecture of a Deccan Sultanate: Courtly Practice and Royal Authority in Late Medieval India was published.[29][30][31] He has also written about language, scripts, numismatics, and material culture.[32]
Pushkar Sohoni often speaks at public events, and has led heritage walks.[33][34][35] He often speaks on the local history of Pune.[36][37] Dr. Sohoni has lectured extensively on the architecture of the Deccan.[38][39] He has also appeared in a documentary film Tales of Ahmednagar on historic Ahmednagar produced by Live History India, a portal for which he was one of the earliest contributors.[40]
He has taught regular courses at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of the Arts (Philadelphia), and the University of British Columbia in addition to the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune.[41][42] He has been a visiting critic at KRVIA.[43]
Since 2015, he is an Associate Editor of South Asian Studies (Journal of the British Association for South Asian Studies (BASAS)).[44][45] In January 2020, he was on a panel at the Kerala Literature Festival to discuss Tony Joseph's book Early Indians.[46]

AwardsEdit

The American Institute of Indian Studies (AIIS) awarded Pushkar Sohoni a Junior Research Fellowship in 2007-08.[47] He was a member of the project Art Space and Mobility in the Early Ages of Globalization,[48] organized by the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz.[49] While in residence at Green College, University of British Columbia, Pushkar Sohoni served on the executive board of the Dining Committee, Residents' Council, and the Membership Committee.[50] In 2013, he was a sub-reviewer for projects that had received the Aga Khan Architectural Award. He is interested in numismatics, and has lent coins to exhibitions, including the show Sultans of Deccan India, 1500–1700: Opulence and Fantasy at the Metropolitan Museum in New York.[51][52][53][54] In 2016-17, he and C. Ryan Perkins won an award from the American Institute of Pakistan Studies (AIPS) to conduct workshops for the cataloging and preservation of the Anjuman-i Taraqqi-i Urdu library in Karachi.[55] Pushkar Sohoni was a non-residential visiting scholar of the Center for the Advanced Study of India at the University of Pennsylvania in the year 2016-17.[56]

Select publicationsEdit

BooksEdit

  • The Architecture of a Deccan Sultanate: Courtly Practice and Royal Authority in Late Medieval India (London: I.B. Tauris, 2018).[57][58]
  • (with Kenneth X. Robbins) Jewish Heritage of the Deccan: Mumbai, the Northern Konkan, Pune (Mumbai: Jaico; Deccan Heritage Foundation, 2017).[59][60]
  • Aurangabad with Daulatabad, Khuldabad, Ahmadnagar (Mumbai: Jaico; Deccan Heritage Foundation, 2015).[61]

Research essays and articlesEdit

  • (with William Kwiatkowski), 'Notice: An Unpublished Inscription from the Fort of Ahmadnagar' in Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society (2019).[62]
  • ‘Architectural Continuity across Political Ruptures: Early Marathas and the Deccan Sultanates’ in Laurie McMillin and Bina Sengar (eds.), Spaces and Places in Western India: Formations and Delineations (New Delhi: Routledge India, 2019), pp. 107-114.[63]
  • ‘The Hunt for a Location: Narratives on the Foundation of Cities in South and Southeast Asia’ in Asian Ethnology, vol. 77, nos. 1&2 (2018), pp. 215–233.[64]
  • ‘The Non-issue of Coinage: The Monetary Policies of the Post-Bahmani Sultanates’ in Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, vol. 28, issue 3 (October 2018), pp. 645–659.[65]
  • ‘Building History: Historiography of Architectural History in South Asia’ in History Compass, vol. 16, no. 5 (May 2018).[66]
  • ‘Imbrication and Implication: Early Maratha Architecture and the Deccan Sultanates’ in Archives of Asian Art, vol. 68, no. 1 (Apr 2018), pp. 33–46.[67]
  • ‘Translocated Animal Subjects in Collaboration: Animals and Human Knowledge’ in Transfers: Interdisciplinary Journal of Mobility Studies, vol. 8 no. 1 (2018), pp. 1–14.[68]
  • (with Carmen Brandt), ‘Script and Identity - The Politics of Writing in South Asia: An Introduction’ to Languages and Scripts of South Asia: Special Issue of South Asian History and Culture, vol. 9, no. 1 (2018), pp. 1–15.[69]
  • ‘Colonial and Post-colonial Debates about Polygraphia in Marathi’ in Languages and Scripts of South Asia: Special Issue of South Asian History and Culture, vol. 9, no. 1 (2018), pp. 38–46.[70]
  • ‘Old Fights, New Meanings: Lions and Elephants in Combat’ in Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics, vol. 67/68 (2016/2017), pp. 225–234.[71]
  • ‘Marathi of a Single Type: the Demise of the Modi Script’ in Modern Asian Studies, vol. 51, issue 3 (May 2017), pp. 662–685.[72]
  • ‘Flushing out the Enemy: Revisiting the Battle of Bhatavadi’ in Bulletin of the Deccan College Post-Graduate and Research Institute, vol. 76 (2016), pp. 15–22.[73]
  • ‘A Tale of Two Imperial Residences: Aurangzeb’s Architectural Patronage’ in Journal of Islamic Architecture, vol. 4, issue 2 (Dec 2016), pp. 63–69.[74]
  • ‘Vernacular as a Space: Writing in the Deccan’ in South Asian History and Culture, vol. 7, no. 3 (Apr 2016), pp. 258–270.[75]
  • ‘Paper Documents and Copper Plates: Localization of Hegemonic Practices’ in Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, vol. 79, issue 1 (Feb 2016), pp. 87–101.[76]
  • ‘Continuities in the Sacred Landscape: Ellora, Khuldabad and the Temple of Ghrishneshwara’ in Syed Ayub Ali (ed.), Studies in Medieval Deccan History: Dr. M.A. Nayeem felicitation volume (Warangal; New Delhi: Deccan History Society; Indian Council of Historical Research, 2015), pp. 56–68.[77]
  • ‘From Defended Settlements to Fortified Strongholds: Responses to Gunpowder in the Early Modern Deccan’ in South Asian Studies (British Association of South Asian Studies), vol. 31, no. 1 (Jan 2015), pp. 111–126.[78]
  • ‘Gaining Pious Merit and Creating Images of Paradise: Gardens and Irrigation’ in K. Krishna Naik and E. Siva Nagi Reddy (eds.), Cultural Contours of History and Archaeology: in honour of Snehasiri Prof. P. Chenna Reddy, vol. 2 (New Delhi: B.R. Publishing Corporation, 2014), pp. 111–119.[79]
  • ‘Patterns of Faith: Mosque Typologies and sectarian affiliation in the kingdom of Ahmadnagar’ in David Roxburgh (ed.), Seeing the Past—Envisioning Islamic Art and Architecture: Essays in Honor of Renata Holod (Leiden: Brill, 2014), pp. 110–127.[80]
  • ‘Medieval Chaul under the Nizam Shahs: an Historic and Archaeological Investigation’ in Laura E. Parodi (ed.), The Visual World of Muslim India: The Art, Culture and Society of the Deccan in the Early Modern Era (London: I.B. Tauris, 2014), pp. 53–75.[81]
  • (with Klaus Rötzer) ‘Nature, Dams, Wells and Gardens: The Route of Water in and around Bidar’ in Daud Ali and Emma Flatt (ed.), Garden and Landscape Practices in Pre-Colonial India (New Delhi: Routledge, 2011), pp. 54–73.[82]
  • ‘Architecture of the Nizam Shahs’ in Helen Philon (ed.), Silent Splendour: Palaces of the Deccan, 14th-19th Centuries (Mumbai: Marg Publications, 2010), pp. 56–65.[83]
  • (with Amol Kulkarni) ‘Index to the Annual Reports of the Archaeological Department of His Exalted Highness The Nizam’s Dominions’ in Journal of Deccan Studies, vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan-Jun 2009), pp. 41–78.[84]
  • ‘Change and memory in Farah Bagh’ in Journal of Deccan Studies, vol. 4 no. 2 (Jul-Dec 2007), pp. 59–77.[85]

Edited Journal IssueEdit

  • (with Carmen Brandt) Languages and Scripts of South Asia: Special Issue of South Asian History and Culture, (2018), vol. 9, no. 1. ISSN 1947-2501

Textbook ChaptersEdit

  • 'Regional Cities', Block 4 (2) Urbanisation in Medieval India-1, MHI-10, Urbanisation in India, IGNOU Study Material (2017), pp. 29–62.[86][87]

Book reviewsEdit

  • REVIEW: Shonaleeka Kaul, The Making of Early Kashmir: Landscape and Identity in the Rajatarangini (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2018) in LA Landscape: Journal of Landscape Architecture, issue 55 (2018), pp. 113–115.[88]
  • REVIEW: Richard M. Eaton and Phillip B. Wagoner, Power, Memory, Architecture: Contested Sites on India's Deccan Plateau, 1300-1600 (New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2014) on H-Asia, H-Net Reviews (May 2017).[89][1]
  • REVIEW: Thomas R. Trautmann, Elephants and Kings: an environmental history (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2015) in South Asian History and Culture, vol. 7, no. 4 (2016), pp. 434–436.[90]
  • REVIEW: Nile Green, Making Space: Sufis and Settlers in Early Modern India (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012) in International Journal of Islamic Architecture, vol. 5, no. 1 (Mar 2016), pp. 213–214.[91]

Online DocumentaryEdit

Tales of Ahmednagar : a short film about historic Ahmadnagar (2019) [92]

Blogs and online essaysEdit

  • 'Of Elephants, Men, and Diplomacy Gone Wrong' for the site Live History India.[2]
  • 'Nizam Shahs of Ahmadnagar: First among Equals' for the site Live History India.[3]
  • ‘Primary Sourcing: Traveling for Collection Development’ for the site International and Area Studies Collections in the 21st Century.[4]
  • ‘Indian Diaries at Penn’ for the site Unique at Penn.[5]
  • ‘Collecting Unusual Material: Notes from the Field’ for the site Unique at Penn.[6]
  • ‘Films in Press’ for the site Unique at Penn.[7]

Column for Pune Mirror: 'By the Wayside'Edit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Faculty Details". The IISER System. Indian Institutes of Science Education and Research. Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  2. ^ Khan, Ashwin. "A Church with History". Pune Mirror. Times of india.
  3. ^ Sohoni, Pushkar (January 2002). "Evaluation of Conservation Plans of City Walls for the Potential Development of Conservation Guidelines for the City Wall of Cairo Through Comparative Studies". Theses (Historic Preservation). Retrieved 3 November 2017.
  4. ^ Matero, Frank; Cancino, Claudia; Rynta, Fourie (2002). Conservation of the Architectural Surfaces Program for Archaeological Resources: Cliff Palace, Mesa Verde National Park (PDF). Philadelphia: The Architectural Conservation Laboratory and Research Center, Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, Graduate School of Fine Arts, University of Pennsylvania.
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  73. ^ Sohoni, Pushkar (2016). "Flushing out the Enemy: Revisiting the Battle of Bhatavadi". Bulletin of the Deccan College Post-Graduate and Research Institute. 76: 15–22. JSTOR 26264763.
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  90. ^ Sohoni, Pushkar (2017). "BOOK REVIEW: Thomas R. Trautman. Elephants and Kings: An Environmental History". South Asian History and Culture. 7:4: 434–436.
  91. ^ Sohoni, Pushkar (2016). "BOOK REVIEW: Nile Green. Making Space: Sufis and Settlers in Early Modern India". International Journal of Islamic Architecture. 5:1: 213–214.
  92. ^ "Tales of Ahmednagar" (Short Film on Historic Ahmadnagar). Live History India. Retrieved 4 February 2019.