Public bill

  (Redirected from Public General Act)

In the legislative process, a public bill is a bill which proposes a law of general application throughout the jurisdiction in which it is proposed, and which if enacted will hence become a public law or public act.

The term "public bill" differentiates such a bill from a private bill, which is a legislative bill affecting only a single person, group, or area, such as a bill granting a named person citizenship or, previously, granting named persons a legislative divorce.

In practice, a (technically) public act can have the effect of a private act by the addition of restrictions such as limiting the act's effect to areas falling within a certain population bracket.

In the United KingdomEdit

Public bills are the most common bills introduced in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. If they are enacted, they become Public General Acts (in contrast with Local and Personal Acts).

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