Progressive Party (Singapore)

The Singapore Progressive Party (abbreviation: PP), or simply the Progressive Party, was a political party that was formed on 25 August 1947. It won the 1948 Legislative Assembly general elections with half of the contested seats in the Legislative Assembly, 3 out of 6. At that time, the self-government power of the Legislative Assembly was still rather limited.

Progressive Party
Chinese name进步党
Jìnbù Dǎng
Malay nameParti Progresif
ڤرتي ڤروݢريسيف
Tamil nameமுற்போக்குக் கட்சி Muṟpōkkuk kaṭci
FounderTan Chye Cheng
Founded25 August 1947; 74 years ago (1947-08-25)
Dissolved10 May 1956; 66 years ago (1956-05-10)
Merged intoLiberal Socialist Party
Succeeded byLiberal Socialist Party
IdeologyConservatism
Political positionRight-wing
Colours  Purple

HistoryEdit

The party was founded by three lawyers, namely Tan Chye Cheng, John Laycock and Nazir Ahmad Mallal. All three were educated at the University of London and were three of the six first ever elected legislative councillors in Singapore. The party was Singapore's first political party.

Party ideologyEdit

The Progressive Party was heavily backed by and made up of English-speaking upper class professionals. Its campaign ideology was to advocate progressive and gradual reforms, rather than sudden, quick, radical ones, which fell in line with British policy at the time, to slowly let Singapore gain full self-government. This approach was criticised vehemently by David Saul Marshall, leader of the Labour Front who instead wanted rapid reform.

Legislative CouncilEdit

In the Legislative Council, the SPP worked closely with the British Government. The SPP fought for equal treatment with both local and European civil servants, but this did not please the Chinese-educated locals, who were very unhappy with the SPP's Pro-British stance.

Central Provident FundEdit

In 1951, PP drafted a law for the setting up of a Central Provident Fund,[1] and it was approved by the British government in 1954, this CPF scheme provides financial security for workers in their retirement or for workers who were unable to work, this scheme came into effect in 1955, when David Marshall took office, and even after so many years, the CPF scheme despite having a few revisions and changes, remains in Singapore.

Election ResultsEdit

Legislative CouncilEdit

Election Seats up for Election Seats contested by Party Contested seats won Contested seats lost Total seats won Change Total votes Share of votes Swing Resulting Government Party Leader
1948 6 5 3 2
3 / 6
  3 11,754
49.49 / 100
  49.49% N/A Tan Chye Cheng
1951 9 8 6 2
6 / 9
  3 11,202
45.37 / 100
  4.12% N/A Tan Chye Cheng
Legislative Council By-Elections
Election Seats up for Election Seats contested by Party Contested seats won Contested seats lost Total seats won Change Total votes Share of votes Resulting Government Party Leader
1948 1 1 0 1
0 / 1
  705
23.91 / 100
N/A Tan Chye Cheng

Legislative AssemblyEdit

Election Seats up for Election Seats contested by Party Contested seats won Contested seats lost Total seats won Change Total votes Share of votes Swing Resulting Government Party Leader
1955 25 22 4 18
4 / 25
  2 38,695
24.75 / 100
  20.62% Opposition Tan Chye Cheng

Municipal Council(till 1951) / City Council(since 1951)Edit

Election Seats up for Election Seats contested by Party Contested seats won Contested seats lost Total seats won Change Total votes Share of votes Swing
April 1949 18 16 13 3
13 / 18
  13 10,874
73.89 / 100
New Party
December 1949 6 6 3 3
12 / 18
  1 3,907
50.05 / 100
  23.84%
1950 6 4 3 1
9 / 18
  3 3,902
32.41 / 100
  17.64%
1951 6 6 2 4
9 / 18
  6,729
43.20 / 100
  10.79%
1952 6 6 4 2
9 / 18
  9,637
42.88 / 100
  0.32%
1953 6 (including 1 unopposed) 4 3 1
9 / 18
  8,532
40.52 / 100
  2.36%

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "PROVIDENT FUND TOR ALL EMPLOYEES". eresources.nlb.gov.sg. Retrieved 2022-01-11.