Prince Friedrich Leopold of Prussia

Joachim Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Leopold Prinz von Preußen (14 November 1865 in Berlin – 13 September 1931 Krojanke manor, Landkreis Flatow, Posen-West Prussia) was a son of Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia and Princess Maria Anna of Anhalt-Dessau, married in 1854.

FamilyEdit

On 24 June 1889 he married in Berlin Princess Louise Sophie of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (8 April 1866 in Kiel – 28 April 1952 in Bad Nauheim), a sister of Empress Auguste Viktoria, wife of Emperor Wilhelm II.

Name Birth Death Notes
Princess Viktoria Margarete Elisabeth Marie Adelheid Ulrike 17 April 1890 9 September 1923 married Prince Heinrich XXXIII Reuss of Köstritz (1879–1942)
Prince Joachim Viktor Wilhelm Leopold Friedrich Sigismund 17 December 1891 6 July 1927 married HSH Princess Marie Luise Dagmar Bathildis Charlotte of Schaumburg-Lippe (10 February 1897-1 October 1938)
Tassilo Wilhelm Humbert Leopold Friedrich Karl 6 April 1893 6 April 1917 known as Prince Friedrich Karl of Prussia, fell in World War I.
Prince Franz Joseph Oskar Ernst Patrick Friedrich Leopold 27 August 1895 27 November 1959

Military careerEdit

At age 10 in 1875 Kadett, in 1885 Premierlieutnant (Oberleutnant), 1888 Rittmeister (Hauptmann), 1890 Major and 1893 Oberst.

In the same year promoted to Generalmajor, commander of the Gardes du Corps, a Cuirassiers regiment of the 1st Guards Cavalry Brigade. Colonel-in-Chief of the Austrian k.u.k. Husarenregimentes Nr. 2 Friedrich Leopold, Prinz von Preußen (since 17. April 1742).

1898 Generalleutnant, leader of Kavallerieinspektion Potsdam. In 1902 General der Kavallerie. Served during Russian-Japanese War (1904–1905) as counselor in the Russian HQ. 1907 Generalinspektor of the Army, 10 September 1910 Generaloberst.

OtherEdit

Prinz Friedrich Leopold was the last patron of the Prussian freemasons from the House of Hohenzollern. A member since 1889 in "Friedrich Wilhelm zur Morgenröte", in 1894 he became patron of all three lodges. During the November Revolution 1918, he hoisted a red flag on his hunting lodge Glienicke near Berlin.

He also owned a large manor at Krojanke, after 1918 located in Posen-West Prussia. On 21 June 1924, possession was confirmed by the Reichsgericht. He died there in 1931.

HonoursEdit

He received the following orders and decorations:

German honours[1]

Foreign honours[7]

AncestryEdit

LiteratureEdit

  • Zivkovic, Georg: Heer- und Flottenführer der Welt. Biblio Verlag, Osnabrück, 1971 S. 427-428 ISBN 3-7648-0666-4

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hof- und Staats-Handbuch des Königreich Preußen (1918), Genealogy p. 4
  2. ^ Hof- und Staats-Handbuch für des Herzogtum Anhalt (1894), "Herzoglicher Haus-Orden Albrecht des Bären" p. 17
  3. ^ Hof- und Staats-Handbuch des Großherzogtum Baden (1896), "Großherzogliche Orden" pp. 63, 77
  4. ^ Hof- und Staats-Handbuch des Königreichs Bayern (1906), "Königliche-Orden" p. 9
  5. ^ Staatshandbücher für das Herzogtum Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha (1890), "Herzogliche Sachsen-Ernestinischer Hausorden" p. 46
  6. ^ Staatshandbuch ... Großherzogtum Sachsen / Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach (1900), "Großherzogliche Hausorden" p. 16
  7. ^ Hof- und Staats-Handbuch des Königreich Preußen (1908), Genealogy p. 3
  8. ^ "A Szent István Rend tagjai" Archived 22 December 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Sveriges statskalender (in Swedish), 1905, p. 440, retrieved 2018-01-06 – via runeberg.org
  10. ^ Anton Anjou (1900). "Utländske Riddare". Riddare af Konung Carl XIII:s orden: 1811–1900: biografiska anteckningar (in Swedish). p. 179.
  11. ^ The London Gazette, issue 27125, p. 6114

External linksEdit