The Prince Albert Raiders are a Canadian major junior ice hockey team based in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Founded in 1971 as a member of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League, the Raiders have been members of the Western Hockey League since 1982. They play in the East Division of the Eastern Conference and host games at the Art Hauser Centre.The Raiders are two-time Ed Chynoweth Cup winners, and won the Memorial Cup as Canadian junior champions in 1985.

Prince Albert Raiders
CityPrince Albert, Saskatchewan
LeagueWestern Hockey League
ConferenceEastern
DivisionEast
Founded1971 (1971)
Home arenaArt Hauser Centre
ColoursGreen, black, gold
     
General managerCurtis Hunt
Head coachJeff Truitt
Websitechl.ca/whl-raiders/
Franchise history
1971–1982Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League
1982–presentWestern Hockey League
Championships
Regular season titles2 (1984–85, 2018–19)
Division titles5 (1984–85, 1991–92, 1998–99, 2018–19, 2019–20)
Playoff championshipsEd Chynoweth Cup
2 (1985, 2019)
Memorial Cup 1 (1985)

History

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Founding and SJHL dynasty

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The Raiders were founded as a Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL) club in 1971, playing out of the newly constructed Prince Albert Communiplex, later renamed the Art Hauser Centre.[1] The Raiders quickly established themselves as one of the most successful Tier II junior clubs in Canada. The team won seven consecutive Anavet Cups from 1976 to 1982, defeating Manitoba Junior Hockey League champions for the right to play for the national championship. Prince Albert went on to win the national championship, the Centennial Cup, four times between 1977 and 1982.[2][3] In this era, the Raiders competed against a number of future Ontario Hockey League teams, including the Guelph Platers and the Belleville Bulls. The team's early success came under manager and coach Terry Simpson—former player James Patrick called the coach "synonymous with winning and competing"[4]—and he remained coach when the team moved up to the top junior ranks by joining the WHL in 1982.[5]

Joining the WHL

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The Raiders' first year in the WHL was a challenging one—the team finished last in the East Division and missed the playoffs.[3] However, Dan Hodgson was named the league's rookie of the year, and the team rapidly improved under Simpson's guidance. The Raiders made the playoffs in their second season, and were a bona fide contender by their third year in the league, boasting a defensive star in Manny Viveiros and future National Hockey League players such as Dave Manson and Ken Baumgartner. Hodgson, now captain, finished second in the league in scoring in 1984–85, and helped pace the Raiders to 58 wins and the league's best regular season record. In the playoffs, the Raiders lost only one game en route to their first league championship, securing the President's Cup with a sweep of the Kamloops Blazers.[6] The Raiders thus earned a spot in the 1985 Memorial Cup.

The Memorial Cup tournament also featured the Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds, the Verdun Junior Canadiens, and the Shawinigan Cataractes. In an opening game that featured 108 minutes in penalties, Prince Albert lost 6–2 to Shawinigan.[7] The second game saw the Raiders beat Verdun 5–3 with 2 goals from defenceman Dave Goertz.[7] In their third game, the Raiders defeated Sault Ste. Marie 8–6; Hodgson had 5 assists in the match.[7] The Raiders and Greyhounds would play each other again in the semi-finals, and Prince Albert would prevail again by a score of 8–3. The Raiders became national champions by defeating the Cataractes 6–1 in the final.[8] The Memorial Cup victory capped off a decade-long run in which the Raiders won five national championships.

The following season, the Raiders finished second overall before losing the Division Final in seven games to the Medicine Hat Tigers. Simpson won his second coach-of-the-year award, and then left the team to coach the New York Islanders, marking the end of an era. Simpson would return for a single season in 1989–90 before leaving again for the NHL.[5]

Post-Simpson era

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The Raiders remained competitive for much of the next decade, including another four runs to the division playoff final between 1990 and 1996. However, despite boasting future NHL players such as Mike Modano, Shane Hnidy, Scott Hartnell, Kyle Chipchura, and Josh Morrissey, the next 22 seasons would see the Raiders win only four playoff series—and none between 2005 and 2019—missing the playoffs altogether eleven times.

Habscheid era

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Marc Habscheid joined the team as coach in 2014, and he worked to rebuild the team into a contender. That work paid off by 2018, when the Raiders began their most successful season in more than two decades. Led by Brett Leason, Noah Gregor, and Ian Scott, 2018–19 saw the Raiders put together their first 100-point season since 1995–96 and their best since 1984–85, securing their second Scotty Munro Trophy as regular season champions. They had a longer road in the playoffs than in 1985, culminating in a seven-game championship series against the Vancouver Giants, a series in which they led 3 games to 1.[6] The Raiders won their second WHL title with a 3–2 game 7 overtime win over the Giants, with Dante Hannoun scoring the overtime winner.[9] The win sent the Raiders to their second Memorial Cup tournament, where they were knocked out in the preliminary round.[10]

Led by the team's first 18-year old captain in Kaiden Guhle, the Raiders had another strong season in 2019–20; however, with the team atop the East Division, the season was cut short and the playoffs cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, ending the Raiders' hopes of repeating.[11] The team participated in a shortened 2020–21 campaign featuring only East Division opponents.[11] Due to the modified campaigns, the Raiders were the last team to win the Ed Chynoweth Cup at when the 2021–22 campaign began.[12]

 
Kyle Chipchura with the Raiders in 2005. Chipchura served as captain in 2005–06.

Logos and uniforms

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The Raiders originally wore green and yellow uniforms with a logo featuring a skating hockey player.[13] From 1985 until the mid-1990s, the team adopted imagery featuring an Arab mascot wielding a scimitar. Although the team moved away from this look in 1996—adopting black as its primary colour and a new logo featuring a pirate's head—the Raiders stirred controversy in the twenty-first century by bringing back elements of branding from the era.[13] In 2014, the team faced criticism for introducing a mascot that was a caricature of an Arab man;[14] the team ultimately retired the mascot and would late introduce a parrot mascot in its place.[15] In 2021, the team forced the WHL to apologize when it brought back its 1980s jerseys as a third-jersey; the move was called "insensitive and offensive".[16]

The Raiders re-adopted green as the primary colour in 2013, and ditched the pirate logo in favour of a sword-and-shield logo featuring "PA" initials.[13] A new third jersey introduced in 2022 paid homage to the pirate era.[17]

Like many junior teams, the Raiders frequently adopt limited-edition and special-event jerseys. In 2024, the team temporarily re-branded as the Cobra Chickens, unveiling a new jersey featuring a Canada goose logo.[18]

Championships

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WHL Championships

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Memorial Cup finals

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Season-by-season record

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Marc Habscheid coached the Raiders from 2014 to 2022.

Note: GP = Games played, W = Wins, L = Losses, T = Ties OTL = Overtime losses Pts = Points, GF = Goals for, GA = Goals against

Season GP W L T OTL GF GA Points Finish Playoffs
Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League
1971–72 44 32 12 0 - 277 185 51 3rd SJHL Lost semifinal
1972–73 48 33 15 0 - 284 202 48 1st SJHL North Lost semifinal
1973–74 50 35 15 0 - 228 204 70 1st SJHL Won League
1974–75 58 39 19 0 - 351 210 78 1st SJHL North Lost final
1975–76 58 47 10 1 - 377 184 95 1st SJHL Won League, won Anavet Cup
1976–77 60 45 14 1 - 392 242 91 1st SJHL North Won League, won Anavet Cup, won Centennial Cup
1977–78 59 41 17 1 - 391 220 83 1st SJHL Won League, won Anavet Cup
1978–79 60 44 13 3 - 405 221 91 1st SJHL Won League, won Anavet Cup, won Centennial Cup
1979–80 60 45 14 1 - 381 197 91 1st SJHL Won League, won Anavet Cup
1980–81 60 50 7 3 - 454 199 103 1st SJHL Won League, won Anavet Cup, won Centennial Cup
1981–82 60 57 3 0 - - - 114 1st SJHL Won League, won Anavet Cup, won Centennial Cup
Western Hockey League
1982–83 72 16 55 1 - 312 455 33 8th East Did not qualify
1983–84 72 41 29 2 - 411 357 84 5th East Lost in first round
1984–85 72 58 11 3 - 481 255 116 1st East Won championship and Memorial Cup
1985–86 72 52 17 3 - 424 257 107 2nd East Lost East Division final
1986–87 72 43 26 3 - 346 264 89 3rd East Lost East Division semifinal
1987–88 72 43 24 5 - 373 284 91 3rd East Lost East Division semifinal
1988–89 72 37 33 2 - 302 286 76 4th East Lost East Division quarterfinal
1989–90 72 38 33 1 - 302 286 77 2nd East Lost East Division final
1990–91 72 38 29 5 - 337 284 81 4th East Lost East Division quarterfinal
1991–92 72 50 20 2 - 356 261 102 1st East Lost East Division final
1992–93 72 25 42 5 - 252 317 55 9th East Did not qualify
1993–94 72 31 37 4 - 326 321 66 8th East Did not qualify
1994–95 72 44 26 2 - 308 267 90 2nd East Lost East Division final
1995–96 72 47 19 6 - 309 250 100 2nd East Lost Eastern Conference final
1996–97 72 29 34 9 - 235 262 67 5th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
1997–98 72 20 47 5 - 322 288 45 6th East Did not qualify
1998–99 72 45 22 5 - 288 213 95 1st East Lost Eastern Conference final
1999–00 72 26 33 6 7 221 257 65 4th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2000–01 72 18 47 3 4 204 348 43 6th East Did not qualify
2001–02 72 26 41 2 3 234 324 57 5th East Did not qualify
2002–03 72 27 37 3 5 185 258 62 5th East Did not qualify
2003–04 72 38 23 6 5 215 186 87 2nd East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2004–05 72 31 32 5 4 185 191 71 3rd East Lost Eastern Conference final
Season GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Points Finish Playoffs
2005–06 72 25 36 1 10 167 228 61 5th East Did not qualify
2006–07 72 27 39 3 3 203 266 60 4th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2007–08 72 26 42 3 2 196 248 57 6th East Did not qualify
2008–09 72 31 36 4 1 233 270 67 4th East Did not qualify
2009–10 72 32 35 3 2 229 249 69 5th East Did not qualify
2010–11 72 31 36 2 3 247 283 67 4th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2011–12 72 21 45 3 3 219 312 48 6th East Did not qualify
2012–13 72 37 28 3 4 234 233 81 2nd East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2013–14 72 35 32 3 2 243 258 75 4th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2014–15 72 31 37 2 2 215 257 66 5th East Did not qualify
2015–16 72 38 26 7 1 222 223 84 2nd East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2016–17 72 21 44 5 2 198 283 49 6th East Did not qualify
2017–18 72 32 27 9 4 245 250 77 5th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2018–19 68 54 10 2 2 307 156 112 1st East Won championship
2019–20 64 36 18 6 4 210 160 82 1st East Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic
2020–21 24 9 11 3 1 70 81 22 4th East No playoff held due to COVID-19 pandemic
2021–22 68 28 35 4 1 194 225 61 5th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal
2022–23 68 28 37 3 1 198 239 59 6th East Did not qualify
2023–24 68 31 32 2 3 215 221 67 4th East Lost Eastern Conference quarterfinal

Playoffs (SJHL)

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  • 1972 Lost semifinal
Raiders defeated Weyburn Red Wings, 4–2
Melville Millionaires defeated Raiders, 4–2
  • 1973 Lost semifinal
Raiders defeated Yorkton Terriers, 4–1
Humboldt Broncos defeated Raiders, 4–0
Raiders defeated Humboldt Broncos, 4–0
Raiders defeated Saskatoon Olympics, 4–0
Raiders defeated Estevan Bruins, 4–1 (SJHL Champions)
Selkirk Steelers (MJHL) defeated Raiders, 4–2
  • 1975 Lost final
Raiders defeated Saskatoon Olympics, 4–1
Raiders defeated Battleford Barons, 4–0
Swift Current Broncos defeated Raiders, 4–2
Raiders defeated Battleford Barons, 4–0
Raiders defeated Swift Current Broncos, 4–0
Raiders defeated Weyburn Red Wings, 4–0 (SJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated Selkirk Steelers (MJHL), 4–1 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Spruce Grove Mets (AJHL) defeated Raiders, 4–1
Raiders defeated Humboldt Broncos, 4–0
Raiders defeated Swift Current Broncos, 4–1
Raiders defeated Melville Millionaires, 4–2 (SJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated Dauphin Kings (MJHL), 4–1 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Calgary Canucks (AJHL), 4–1 (Abbott Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Pembroke Lumber Kings (CJHL), 4–0 (Centennial Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Battleford Barons, 4–0
Raiders defeated Swift Current Broncos, 4–3
Raiders defeated Moose Jaw Canucks, 4–1 (SJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated Kildonan North Stars (MJHL), 4–0 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Merritt Centennials (BCJHL), 4–1 (Abbott Cup Champions)
Guelph Platers (OPJHL) defeated Raiders, 4–0
Raiders defeated Battleford Barons, 4–1
Raiders defeated Swift Current Broncos, 4–3
Raiders defeated Moose Jaw Canucks, 4–2 (SJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated Selkirk Steelers (MJHL), 4–1 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Fort Saskatchewan Traders (AJHL), 4–2 Abbott Cup Champions)
First in 1979 Centennial Cup round robin (3-1)
Raiders defeated Sherwood-Parkdale Metros (IJHL), 5-4 (OT) in final (Centennial Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Weyburn Red Wings, 4–1
Raiders defeated Swift Current Broncos, 4–2
Raiders defeated Moose Jaw Canucks, 4–2 (SJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated Selkirk Steelers (MJHL), 4–2 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Red Deer Rustlers (AJHL) defeated Raiders, 4–2
Raiders defeated Battleford Barons, 4–0
Raiders defeated Humboldt Broncos, 4–0
Raiders defeated Moose Jaw Canucks, 4–3 (SAJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated St. Boniface Saints (MJHL), 4–1 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated St. Albert Saints (AJHL), 4–0 (Abbott Cup Champions)
First in 1981 Centennial Cup round robin (3-1)
Raiders defeated Belleville Bulls (OPJHL), 6-2 in final (Centennial Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Humboldt Broncos, 4–0
Raiders defeated Swift Current Broncos, 4–0
Raiders defeated Yorkton Terriers, 4–0 (SAJHL Champions)
Raiders defeated Fort Garry Blues (MJHL), 4–2 (Anavet Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated St. Albert Saints (AJHL), 4–1 (Abbott Cup Champions)
Raiders defeated Guelph Platers (OJHL), 4–0 (Centennial Cup Champions)

Players

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Current roster

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Updated January 11, 2024.[19]

# Nat Player Pos S/G Age Acquired Birthplace Drafted
18   Oli Chenier LW R 17 2022 Winnipeg, Manitoba Eligible 2025
7   Justice Christensen D R 18 2022 Red Deer, Alberta Undrafted
24   Niall Crocker (A) RW R 19 2019 Delta, British Columbia Undrafted
15   Brayden Dube RW R 18 2022 Roblin, Manitoba Eligible 2024
10   Terrell Goldsmith D L 19 2020 Fort St. James, British Columbia 2023, 102nd Overall, ARI
30   Max Hildebrand G L 19 2019 Martensville, Saskatchewan Undrafted
14   Jacob Hoffrogge D R 21 2023 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Undrafted
3   Eric Johnston (C) D L 20 2019 Regina, Saskatchewan Undrafted
8   Easton Kovacs D L 19 2022 Delta, British Columbia Undrafted
32   Matej Kubiesa RW R 17 2023 Frýdek-Místek, Czech Republic Eligible 2024
29   Harrison Lodewyk RW L 19 2020 Red Deer, Alberta Undrafted
34   Krzysztof Macias LW L 20 2023 Nowy Targ, Poland Undrafted
28   Grady Martin C L 18 2021 Oyen, Alberta Eligible 2024
27   Turner McMillen RW L 21 2024 Carievale, Saskatchewan Undrafted
20   Luke Moroz LW L 16 2022 Grand Coulee, Saskatchewan Eligible 2025
18   Aiden Oiring C L 19 2022 Calgary, Alberta Undrafted
16   Cole Peardon RW L 18 2021 Outlook, Saskatchewan Eligible 2024
5   Doogan Pederson D L 17 2022 Langley, British Columbia Eligible 2024
35   Nathan Preston G L 18 2023 Penticton, British Columbia Eligible 2024
21   Ryder Ritchie LW R 17 2021 Calgary, Alberta Eligible 2024
2   Tyrone Sobry D L 17 2021 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Eligible 2024
23   Sloan Stanick (A) LW R 20 2021 Rapid City, Manitoba Undrafted

NHL alumni

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The following list includes alumni from the Prince Albert Raiders of the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League (SJHL) and the Western Hockey League (WHL) who went on to play in the National Hockey League.[citation needed]

SJHL Raiders

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WHL Raiders

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Retired numbers

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Numbers retired by the Raiders:[20]

# Player
4 Dave Manson
9 Mike Modano
16 Dan Hodgson

Team records

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Team records for a single season[21]
Statistic Total Season
Most points 119 1984–85
Most wins 58 1984–85
Most road wins 27 1984–85
Most home wins 31 1984–85
Most goals for 481 1984–85
Fewest goals for 167 2005–06
Fewest goals against 156 2018–19
Most goals against 444 1982–83
Individual player records for a single season[21]
Statistic Player Total Season
Most goals Dan Hodgson 70 1984–85
Most assists Dan Hodgson 119 1983–84
Most points Dan Hodgson 182 1984–85
Most points, defenceman Manny Viveiros 109 1983–84
Penalty minutes Darin Kimble 307 1987–88
Best GAA (goalie) Ian Scott 1.83 2018–19
Goalies = minimum 1500 minutes played
Career records[21]
Statistic Player Total Career
Most goals Dan Hodgson 188 1982–1985
Most assists Dan Hodgson 305 1982–1985
Most points Dan Hodgson 493 1982–1985
Most points, defenceman Manny Viveiros 321 1982–1986
Most games played Sean Montgomery 345 2014–2019
Most games played (goalie) Evan Lindsay 206 1996–2000
Most shutouts (goalie) Rejean Beauchemin 12 2002–2005

Awards

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See also

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References

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  1. ^ Jordan, Kevin (2019-10-12). "Prince Albert Raiders". WHL Arena Guide. Archived from the original on 2023-06-07. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  2. ^ "Raider History". Prince Albert Raiders. Archived from the original on 2023-09-30. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  3. ^ a b Lapp, Richard M.; White, Silas (1993). Local Heroes: A History of the Western Hockey League. Madeira Park, British Columbia: Harbour Publishing. pp. 145–147. ISBN 1-55017-080-5.
  4. ^ Mahon, Rob (2023-03-21). "'One of the greatest years of my life': Former Raider Patrick recalls lone season in Prince Albert". PA Now. Archived from the original on 2023-05-08. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  5. ^ a b "Terry Simpson given big honour by WHL". PA Now. 2011-03-18. Archived from the original on 2024-05-11. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  6. ^ a b Provost, Kelly (2019-05-10). "Prince Albert Raiders on the verge of a WHL championship". CBC News. Archived from the original on 2019-05-11. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  7. ^ a b c Lapp, Richard; Macaulay, Alec (1997). The Memorial Cup: Canada's National Junior Hockey Championship. Madeira Park, B.C.: Harbour Publishing. pp. 219–220. ISBN 1-55017-170-4.
  8. ^ "1985 Memorial Cup winners celebrate 30th anniversary in Prince Albert". CBC News. 2015-03-13. Archived from the original on 2015-03-14.
  9. ^ "Raiders beat Giants in overtime to win WHL title in seven games". Sportsnet. Canadian Press. 2019-05-14. Archived from the original on 2019-05-14. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  10. ^ Larson, Scott (2019-05-22). "'No one picked us to be here,' Raiders coach says as Prince Albert ousted from Memorial Cup". CBC News. Archived from the original on 2019-05-23. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  11. ^ a b Bidwell, Derek (2021-03-05). "Prince Albert Raiders return as one of the favourites in shortened WHL season". Global News. Archived from the original on 2021-03-05. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  12. ^ D'Andrea, Jeff (2021-05-13). "Looking back at the time the Raiders won it all". PA Now. Archived from the original on 2021-05-13. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  13. ^ a b c Creamer, Chris (2013-05-16). "Back to Green: Prince Albert Raiders Unveil New Look". SportsLogos.net. Archived from the original on 2021-07-25. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  14. ^ "Prince Albert Raiders unveil new mascot, stir public controversy". CTV News. 2014-11-18. Archived from the original on 2014-11-21. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  15. ^ Vecchio, Jaryn (2021-12-21). "P.A. Raiders unveil new mascot". PA Now. Archived from the original on 2021-12-22. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  16. ^ "'Insensitive and offensive' Prince Albert Raiders jersey to be discontinued immediately". CBC Sports. 2021-10-02. Archived from the original on 2021-10-03. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  17. ^ Craddock, Derek (2022-03-19). "'I'm very happy': Designer of new Raiders jersey can't wait to see them on the ice". PA Now. Archived from the original on 2022-03-19. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  18. ^ McLernon, Will (2024-01-25). "Prince Albert's WHL Cobra Chickens the latest in a trend of lighthearted 1-day rebrands". CBC News. Archived from the original on 2024-01-25. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
  19. ^ WHL Network, Western Hockey League, retrieved 2024-01-11
  20. ^ Kowal, Nolan (2024-12-23). "Year in Review: Dan Hodgson's number 16 retired by Raiders". PA Now. Archived from the original on 2024-05-11. Retrieved 2024-02-07.
  21. ^ a b c "Team Record Book". Prince Albert Raiders. Archived from the original on 2023-09-30. Retrieved 2024-05-11.
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Preceded by Centennial Cup Champions
1977
Succeeded by
Preceded by Centennial Cup Champions
1979
Succeeded by
Preceded by Centennial Cup Champions
1981 and 1982
Succeeded by