President of the Presidency of Yugoslavia

The office of the President of the Presidency of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia existed from the death of the President of the Republic for life Josip Broz Tito on 4 May 1980 until the dissolution of the country by 1992.

President of the Presidency of Yugoslavia
Standard of a Member of the Presidency of SFR Yugoslavia.svg
StatusAbolished
Member ofPresidency of Yugoslavia
Term length1 year
PrecursorPresident of Yugoslavia
Formation4 May 1980
First holderLazar Koliševski
Final holderStjepan Mesić
Abolished15 June 1992
SuccessionPresidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina
President of Croatia
President of Serbia and Montenegro
President of North Macedonia
President of Slovenia

A collective presidency existed in Yugoslavia since amendments to the 1963 Constitution in 1971.[1] In 1974 a new Constitution was adopted which reaffirmed the collective federal presidency consisting of representatives of the six republics, the two autonomous provinces within Serbia and (until 1988) the President of the League of Communists. The 1974 Constitution defined the office of President of the Presidency, but only coming into effect with the disestablishment of the office of President of the Republic.[2] A separate article affirmed Josip Broz Tito with an unlimited mandate which ensured the new President of the Presidency would not come into effect until after his death.[3] Simultaneously an office of Vice President of the Presidency had been in place since 1971 on a rotating annual basis between republican and provincial representatives. When Tito died on 4 May 1980, the then Vice President of the Presidency Lazar Koliševski acceded to the role of President of the Presidency. Subsequent to this the role of President of the Presidency would rotate on an annual basis with each President serving as Vice President the year prior.

ListEdit

  League of Communists of Yugoslavia   Liberal Democratic Party of Slovenia   Socialist Party of Serbia   Croatian Democratic Union   Democratic Party of Socialists of Montenegro   Denotes Acting Head of State

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Representing Term of office Political party Note
Took office Left office Time in office
1Lazar Koliševski
(1914–2000)
Macedonia4 May 198015 May 198011 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
2Cvijetin Mijatović
(1913–1993)
Bosnia and
Herzegovina
15 May 198015 May 19811 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
3Sergej Kraigher
(1914–2001)
Slovenia15 May 198115 May 19821 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
4Petar Stambolić
(1912–2007)
Serbia15 May 198215 May 19831 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
5Mika Špiljak
(1916–2007)
Croatia15 May 198315 May 19841 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
6Veselin Đuranović
(1925–1997)
Montenegro15 May 198415 May 19851 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
7Radovan Vlajković
(1924–2001)
SAP Vojvodina15 May 198515 May 19861 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
8Sinan Hasani
(1922–2010)
SAP Kosovo15 May 198615 May 19871 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
9Lazar Mojsov
(1920–2011)
Macedonia15 May 198715 May 19881 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
10Raif Dizdarević
(born 1926)
Bosnia and
Herzegovina
15 May 198815 May 19891 year, 0 daysSKJChairman of the collective head of state.
11Janez Drnovšek
(1950–2008)
Slovenia15 May 198915 May 19901 year, 0 daysLDS
SKJ
Joined Liberal Democratic Party of Slovenia in February 1990.
12Borisav Jović
(born 1928)
Serbia15 May 199015 May 19911 year, 0 daysSPS
SKJ
SKJ dissolved in 1990.
In Serbia the party was succeeded by the SPS.
Sejdo Bajramović
(1927–1993)
Acting
AP Kosovo16 May 199130 June 199145 daysSPSActing president.
13Stjepan Mesić
(born 1934)
Croatia30 June 19915 December 1991158 daysHDZChairman of the collective head of state.
Last President of Yugoslavia.
Branko Kostić
(1939–2020)
Acting
Montenegro5 December 199115 June 1992193 daysDPSActing president.
Installed by Serbia and Montenegro.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Službeni list Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije". XXVII (29). Belgrade. 8 July 1971.
  2. ^ "Službeni list Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije". XXX (9). Belgrade. 21 February 1974.
  3. ^ "Službeni list Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije". XXX (9). Belgrade. 21 February 1974.