Open main menu

The President of the Republic of the Marshall Islands is the head of state and government of the Marshall Islands. The Pesident is elected by the Nitijeļā (Legislature) from among its members. Presidents pick cabinet members from the Nitijeļā.

President of the
Republic of the Marshall Islands
Seal of the Marshall Islands.svg
Seal of Government of
the Republic of the Marshall Islands
Hilda Heine 20171030.jpg
Incumbent
Hilda Heine

since 28 January 2016
Term lengthFour years, renewable once
Inaugural holderAmata Kabua
Formation17 November 1979
DeputyMinister in Assistance to the President of Marshall Islands

Amata Kabua was elected as the first President of the Republic in 1979.[1] Subsequently, he was re-elected to four-year terms in 1983, 1987, 1991, and 1996. After Amata Kabua's death in office, his first cousin, Imata Kabua, won a special election in 1997.[2] Casten Nemra, who was elected and took office in January 2016, was replaced by Hilda Heine one week later.

PresidentsEdit


President Took office Left office Political Affiliation Notes
1   Amata Kabua
(1928–1996)
November 17, 1979 December 20, 1996 Independent Died in office
2   Kunio Lemari
(1942–2008)
December 20, 1996 January 14, 1997 Aelon̄ Kein Ad
United Democratic Party
3   Imata Kabua
(1943–2019)
January 14, 1997 January 10, 2000 Aelon̄ Kein Ad
United Democratic Party
4   Kessai Note
(1950-)
January 10, 2000 January 14, 2008 United Democratic Party
5   Litokwa Tomeing
(1939-)
January 14, 2008 October 21, 2009 United People's Party
6   Ruben Zackhras
(1947-)
October 21, 2009 November 2, 2009 United Democratic Party
7   Jurelang Zedkaia
(1950–2015)
November 2, 2009 January 10, 2012 Independent
8   Christopher Loeak
(1952-)
January 10, 2012 January 11, 2016 Independent
9   Casten Nemra
(1971-)
January 11, 2016 January 28, 2016 Independent
10   Hilda C. Heine
(1951-)
January 28, 2016 Incumbent Independent

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Saxon, Wolfgang (26 December 1996). "Amata Kabua, 68, President Of Marshall Islands, Is Dead". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 January 2016.
  2. ^ Hassall, Graham; Saunders, Cheryl. Asia-Pacific Constitutional Systems. Cambridge University Press. p. 264. ISBN 978-0521033411.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit