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Portal:Women's sport

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The Women's Sport Portal
This is a sister portal of the Sport Portal and Feminism Portal

Introduction

Black and white picture of several women on roller skates coming around a curve in a roller derby track
Women's sports include amateur and professional competitions in virtually all sports. Female participation in sports rose dramatically in the twentieth century, especially in the last quarter, reflecting changes in modern societies that emphasized gender parity. Although the level of participation and performance still varies greatly by country and by sport, women's sports have broad acceptance throughout the world, and in a few instances, such as tennis and figure skating, rival or exceed their male counterparts in popularity.

Few women competed in sports until the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as social changes in Europe and North America favored increased female participation in society as equals with men. Although women were permitted to participate in many sports, relatively few showed interest, and there was often disapproval of those who did. The modern Olympics had female competitors from 1900 onward, though women at first participated in considerably fewer events than men. Concern over the physical strength and stamina of women led to the discouragement of female participation in more physically intensive sports, and in some cases led to less physically demanding female versions of male sports. Thus netball was developed out of basketball and softball out of baseball.

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  • ... Netball is the most popular women's sport in New Zealand, in terms of player participation and public interest?


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Canadian Hayley Wickenheiser is the all-time leading scorer in the women's tournament and was named tournament MVP twice.

At the 99th IOC Session in July 1992, the IOC voted to approve women's hockey as an Olympic event beginning with the 1998 Winter Olympics as part of their effort to increase the number of female athletes at the Olympics. Women's hockey had not been in the programme when Nagano, Japan had won the right to host the Olympics, and the decision required approval by the Nagano Winter Olympic Organizing Committee (NWOOC). The NWOOC was initially hesitant to include the event because of the additional costs of staging the tournament and because they felt their team, which had failed to qualify for that year's World Championships, could not be competitive. According to Glynis Peters, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association's (CAHA) head of female hockey, "the Japanese would have to finance an entirely new sports operation to bring their team up to Olympic standards in six years, which they were also really reluctant to do." Part of the agreement was that the tournament would be limited to six teams, and no additional facilities would be built. The CAHA also agreed to help build and train the Japanese team so that it could be more competitive. The IOC had agreed that if the NWOOC had not approved the event, it would be held at the 2002 Winter Olympics. The format of the first tournament was similar to the men's: preliminary round-robin games followed by a medal round playoff.

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EAGL became a reality on July 31, 1995, when eight universities banded together to form a union solely for the purpose of showcasing women’s gymnastics on the East Coast. The league presently consists of the University of Maryland, University of North Carolina, and North Carolina State University of the Atlantic Coast Conference; University of Pittsburgh, Rutgers University and West Virginia University of the Big East Conference; George Washington of the Atlantic 10 Conference and the University of New Hampshire of the America East Conference. Towson University, one of the original league members, left EAGL in 2005 to rejoin the Eastern College Athletic Conference. In August 1996, the NCAA Council accepted the EAGL as an official affiliated member of the NCAA.

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Biathlon - Mosses - 1.jpg
Biathlètes femmes aux Mosses pour la Coupe suisse de Biathlon.


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Ellen van Dijk, a woman cyclist the Netherlands
Ellen van Dijk at the 2012 Olympic Games.

Eleonora "Ellen" van Dijk (born 11 February 1987 in Harmelen) is a Dutch professional road and track racing cyclist riding for Velocio–SRAM Pro Cycling. Van Dijk is a time trial specialist and became 2008 World Track Champion in the scratch race and 2012 Road World Champion in team time trial.

Van Dijk started as a speed skater and as part of her skating training she undertook cycling as part of cross-training in summer. She excelled at both, competing nationally at junior level. After becoming a national cycling champion for the fifth time in 2007, she quit speed skating and became a full-time cyclist. Along with her world title successes, Van Dijk has also twice been European track champion, twice European time trial champion and has won five world cup races. In 2012 she competed in three disciplines at the 2012 Olympic Games in London, where she helped Marianne Vos win the gold medal in the road race, finished eighth in the time trial and sixth in the team pursuit.

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Jennifer Screen

February 19

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