Open main menu

Selected biography

Pattonphoto.jpg
George Smith Patton Jr. (November 11, 1885 – December 21, 1945) was a leading U.S. Army general in World War II. In his 36-year Army career he finished in Fifth Place in the Military Pentathlon at the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm, Sweden and commanded major units of North Africa, Sicily, and the European Theater of Operations. Many have viewed Patton as a pure, ruthless and ferocious warrior, known by the nickname "Old Blood and Guts", a name given to him after a reporter misquoted his statement that it takes blood and brains to win a war.



General John Joseph Pershing head on shoulders.jpg
John Joseph "Black Jack" Pershing (September 13, 1860 – July 15, 1948) was an officer in the United States Army. Pershing eventually rose to the highest rank ever held in the United States ArmyGeneral of the Armies—equivalent only to the posthumous rank of George Washington. Pershing led the American Expeditionary Force in World War I and was regarded as a mentor by the generation of American generals who led the United States army forces in Europe during World War II, including George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Omar Bradley and George S. Patton.



EisenhowerChiefofStaffPortrait.jpg
Dwight David "Ike" Eisenhower (born David Dwight Eisenhower on October 14, 1890 – March 28, 1969) was an American soldier and politician, who served as the thirty-fourth President of the United States (1953-1961). During World War II, he served as Supreme Commander of the Allied forces in Europe, with responsibility for planning and supervising the successful invasion of France and Germany in 1944-45. In 1951 he became the first supreme commander of NATO. As a Republican, he was elected the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961), serving for two terms. As President he ended the Korean War, kept up the pressure on the Soviet Union during the Cold War, made nuclear weapons a higher defense priority, launched the space race, enlarged the Social Security program, and began building the Interstate Highway System.



William Tecumseh Sherman.jpg
William Tecumseh Sherman (February 8, 1820 – February 14, 1891) was an American soldier, businessman, educator, and author. He served as a general in the United States Army during the American Civil War (1861–65), receiving both recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy, and criticism for the harshness of the "scorched earth" policies he implemented in conducting total war against the enemy. Military historian Basil Liddell Hart famously declared that Sherman was "the first modern general."[1] Sherman served under General Ulysses S. Grant in 1862 and 1863 during the campaigns that led to the fall of the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg on the Mississippi River and culminated with the routing of the Confederate armies in the state of Tennessee. In 1864, Sherman succeeded Grant as the Union commander in the western theater of the war. He proceeded to lead his troops to the capture of the city of Atlanta, a military success that contributed decisively to the re-election of President Abraham Lincoln. Sherman's subsequent march through Georgia and the Carolinas further undermined the Confederacy's ability to continue fighting. He accepted the surrender of all the Confederate armies in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida in April 1865.



Omar Bradley, official military photo, 1949.JPEG
Omar Nelson Bradley (February 12, 1893 – April 8, 1981) was one of the main U.S. Army field commanders in North Africa and Europe during World War II and a General of the Army of the United States Army. He was the last surviving five star officer of the United States. On May 5, 2000, the United States Postal Service issued the Distinguished Soldiers stamps in which Bradley was honored.



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/6



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/7



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/8



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/9



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/10



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/11



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/12



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/13



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/14



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/15



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/16



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/17



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/18



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/19



Portal:United States Army/Selected biography/20



  1. ^ Liddell Hart, p. 430