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Portal:Smartphone


Introduction

Two smartphones: a Samsung Galaxy J5 (left) and an iPhone 6S (right)

Smartphones are a class of multi-purpose mobile computing device. They are distinguished from feature phones by their stronger hardware capabilities and extensive mobile operating systems, which facilitate wider software, internet (including web browsing over mobile broadband), and multimedia functionality (including music, video, cameras, and gaming), alongside core phone functions such as voice calls and text messaging. Smartphones typically include various sensors that can be leveraged by their software, such as a magnetometer, proximity sensors, barometer, gyroscope and accelerometer, and support wireless communications protocols such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and satellite navigation.

Early smartphones were marketed primarily towards the enterprise market, attempting to bridge the functionality of standalone personal digital assistant (PDA) devices with support for cellular telephony, but were limited by their battery life, bulky form factors, and the immaturity of wireless data services. In the 2000's, BlackBerry, Nokia's Symbian platform, and Windows Phone began to gain market traction, with models often featuring QWERTY keyboards or resistive touchscreen input, and emphasizing access to push email and wireless internet. Since the 2007 unveiling of the iPhone, the majority of smartphones have featured thin, slate-like form factors, with large, capacitive screens with support for multi-touch gestures rather than physical keyboards, and offer the ability for users to download or purchase additional applications from a centralized store, and use cloud storage and synchronization, virtual assistants, as well as mobile payment services.

Improving hardware and faster wireless standards (such as LTE) have bolstered the growth of the smartphone industry. In the third quarter of 2012, one billion smartphones were in use worldwide. Global smartphone sales surpassed the sales figures for feature phones in early 2013.

Selected article

Smartphones running Android OS

The phablet (/ˈfæblɪt/) is a class of mobile computing devices designed to combine or straddle the size format of smartphones and tablets. The word phablet is a portmanteau of the words phone and tablet.

Phablets typically have a diagonal display measurement ranging from 5.1–6.99 inches (130–178 mm) — however, some currently consider only those with a size greater than 6 inches — a range that complements screen-intensive activity such as mobile web browsing and multimedia viewing. They may also include software optimized for an integral self-storing stylus to facilitate sketching, note-taking and annotation. Because of their size, phablet use may require two hands.

Selected biography

Steve Jobs with iPhone

Steven Paul "Steve" Jobs (/ˈɒbz/; February 24, 1955 – October 5, 2011) was an American businessman, inventor, and industrial designer. He was the co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer (CEO) of Apple Inc.; CEO and majority shareholder of Pixar; a member of The Walt Disney Company's board of directors following its acquisition of Pixar; and founder, chairman, and CEO of NeXT. Jobs is widely recognized as a pioneer of the microcomputer revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, along with Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak.

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