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Portal:Library and information science

The Library and Information Science Portal

Introduction

Library and information science (LIS) (sometimes given as the plural library and information sciences) or as "library and information studies" is a merging of library science and information science. The joint term is associated with schools of library and information science (abbreviated to "SLIS"). In the last part of the 1960s, schools of librarianship, which generally developed from professional training programs (not academic disciplines) to university institutions during the second half of the 20th century, began to add the term "information science" to their names. The first school to do this was at the University of Pittsburgh in 1964. More schools followed during the 1970s and 1980s, and by the 1990s almost all library schools in the USA had added information science to their names. Weaver Press: Although there are exceptions, similar developments have taken place in other parts of the world. In Denmark, for example, the 'Royal School of Librarianship' changed its English name to The Royal School of Library and Information Science in 1997. Exceptions include Tromsø, Norway, where the term documentation science is the preferred name of the field, France, where information science and communication studies form one interdiscipline, and Sweden, where the fields of Archival science, Library science and Museology have been integrated as Archival, Library and Museum studies.

In spite of various trends to merge the two fields, some consider the two original disciplines, library science and information science, to be separate. However, the tendency today is to use the terms as synonyms or to drop the term "library" and to speak about information departments or I-schools. There have also been attempts to revive the concept of documentation and to speak of Library, information and documentation studies (or science).

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Carnegie library, opened in 1913 in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, designed in Spanish Colonial style
Carnegie libraries are libraries which were built with money donated by Scottish-American businessman Andrew Carnegie. Over 2,500 Carnegie libraries were built, including public and university libraries. Carnegie earned the nickname Patron Saint of Libraries.

Of the 2,509 libraries funded between 1883 and 1929, 1,689 were built in the United States, 660 in Britain and Ireland, 156 in Canada, and others in Australia, New Zealand, the Caribbean, and Fiji. Very few towns that requested a grant and agreed to his terms were refused. When the last grant was made in 1919, there were 3,500 libraries in the United States, nearly half of them paid for by Carnegie.

In the early 20th century, a Carnegie library was the most imposing structure in hundreds of small American communities from Maine to California. Contrary to the belief of many people, most of the library buildings were unique, displaying a number of different Beaux-Arts and other architectural styles, including Italian Renaissance, Baroque, Classical Revival and Spanish Colonial. Each style was chosen by the community and was typically simple and formal, welcoming patrons to enter through a prominent doorway, nearly always accessed via a staircase. The staircase was intended to show that the person was elevating himself. Similarly, outside virtually every branch a lamppost or lantern symbolized enlightenment.

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Information can tell us everything. It has all the answers. But they are answers to questions we have not asked, and which doubtless don't even arise.
Jean Baudrillard, unknown

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Nancy Pearl (born January 12, 1945) is a librarian, best-selling author, book reviewer and was, until August 2004, the Executive Director of the Washington Center for the Book at Seattle Public Library. Her prolific reading and her knowledge of books and literature first made her locally famous in Seattle, Washington, where she regularly appears on public radio recommending books.

Pearl achieved broader fame with Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment and Reason, (2003) her guide to good reading, and the sequel More Book Lust (summer 2005) with the same subtitle, which received much acclaim ("a sprightly follow-up"), and was chosen by the Today Show as one of their book-club selections. As of 2006, she is working on a book of recommendations for children and teens to be called Book Crush.

Pearl's approach to enjoying reading is the Rule of 50 which states "If you still don't like a book after slogging through the first 50 pages, set it aside. If you're more than 50 years old, subtract your age from 100 and only grant it that many pages."

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In the news

  • March,2012, Muhammad Shahid Soroya elected as President Punjab University Library & Information Science Alumni Association (PULISAA) in Pakistan
  • September 21, 2011 - Library vendor OverDrive, Inc. adds Amazon Kindle compatible E-books to public and school libraries, allowing library lending over Amazon's Whispernet technology.(OverDrive)


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Interior of the Trinity College Library in Dublin.
Image credit: User:Diliff
The 65-metre-long (213 ft) main chamber of the Trinity College Library in Dublin was built between 1712 and 1732 and houses 200,000 of the library's oldest books.

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Topics in library and information science


The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to library science:

Library science – study of issues related to libraries and the information fields. This includes academic studies regarding how library resources are used and how people interact with library systems. The organization of knowledge for efficient retrieval of relevant information is also a major research goal of library science. Being interdisciplinary, it overlaps with computer science, various social sciences, statistics, and systems analysis. It is also called "library and information science", abbreviated "LIS".


Essence of library science

Branches of library science

Types of library-science professionals

History of library science

History of library science

Types of libraries

Specific libraries

Library resources

Information media

Types of publications

Catalogs and indexes

Information science

Organization of information

Electronic information storage and retrieval

Infometrics

Scientometrics

Scientometrics – studies quantitative aspects of science

Informatics

Informatics

Information and society

Library operations and management

Library management

Research methods

Organizing and searching Wikipedia

Selection and acquisition of library materials

Preservation

Preservation

Other library services and processes

Politics of library science

Legal issues

Laws

Legal precedents

Social issues

Education and training

Education for librarianship

Academic courses in library science

Professional organizations

Notable people in library science

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External links

History

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